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Every MLB Team's Biggest Draft Bust in the Past Decade

Rick WeinerFeatured ColumnistJune 5, 2013

Every MLB Team's Biggest Draft Bust in the Past Decade

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    Swinging and missing in the first round of the MLB draft can set a franchise back years.

    It's the kind of thing that keeps scouts and general managers up at night, for they know that no matter how far the evolution of player evaluation has come, projecting how an amateur will fare as a professional is, at the end of the day, nothing more than a crapshoot.

    Since 2002, thousands of ballplayers have been drafted by major league franchises. Some have gone on to become superstars, while others have turned into quality role players for their respective teams.

    The vast majority, however, have made little to no impact on the game at its highest level.

    When the words "first-round pick" are next to those players' names, that lack of production makes those swings and misses sting significantly more.

    With that in mind, and with the 2013 MLB draft set to get underway in just over 24 hours, let's take a look back at the biggest first-round pick each team has missed on over the past decade—and some of the evaluations that may have helped lead that team to that misguided decision.

     

     

    *Unless otherwise noted, all statistics and draft results courtesy of Baseball-Reference.com.

    *Unless otherwise noted, all scouting reports courtesy of BaseballAmerica.com.

Baltimore Orioles

2 of 31

    The Bust: LHP Adam Loewen

    Drafted: 2002 (No. 4 overall) from Fraser Valley Christian HS (Surrey, BC, Canada)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "The Arizona State signee has become bigger and stronger and now projects to be the highest-drafted Canadian ever--possibly even No. 1 overall. The 6-foot-6, 220-pound lefthander has silky smooth mechanics, a fluid, effortless arm action with good extension and a calm mound presence.

    "Loewen is also an accomplished hitter with a sweet lefthanded stroke and power potential. He was used in the outfield and at DH during the 2000 World Junior Championship, and he hit third in the lineup for Canada's junior national team during a spring trip to Florida."

     

    His Career

    Adam Loewen never reached his high ceiling on the mound. He went 8-8 with a 5.38 ERA and 1.64 WHIP over 35 games in an Orioles uniform from 2006 through 2008 and battled ineffectiveness and injury along the way.

    Loewen signed with the Toronto Blue Jays as a free agent after the 2008 season, leaving the hard dirt of the pitcher's mound for the lush grass of the outfield. He didn't return to big league action until 2011, going 6-for-32 with a home run in 14 games for the Blue Jays.

    Currently playing for Toronto's Double-A affiliate, 29-year-old Loewen is hitting a combined .226 with five home runs and 15 RBI in 41 games, all but one with Double-A New Hampshire.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Loewen

    • RHP Zack Greinke, Kansas City Royals (No. 6)
    • 1B Prince Fielder, Milwaukee Brewers (No. 7)
    • 1B Nick Swisher, Oakland Athletics (No. 16)
    • LHP Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies (No. 17)
    • RHP Matt Cain, San Francisco Giants (No. 25)

Boston Red Sox

3 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Craig Hansen

    Drafted: 2005 (No. 26 overall) from St. John's University

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Hansen stamped himself as a potential premium pick last summer as an all-star closer in the Cape Cod League, where he went 1-1, 0.00 with 10 saves, striking out 41 and walking two in 22 innings. He has continued his domination this spring at St. John's, where he was 2-2, 1.41 with a school-record 14 saves to go with 77 strikeouts and 17 walks in 57 innings.

    "He has electric stuff to match his numbers. He pounds the strike zone with a fastball that has been clocked consistently in the mid-90s and tops out at 97 mph. The velocity on his slider has been even more impressive, sitting at 85-86 mph with a high of 90. Though his fastball command wavers, he has an excellent approach to pitching and isn't afraid to go right at hitters. He should be even more effective against wood bats.

    "Some teams have also talked about trying him as a starter because they see a pitcher with No. 1 stuff. He was used in that role in high school--when he wasn't drafted despite going 8-0, 0.00 with 119 strikeouts in 69 innings--and as a freshman at St. John's. But the sentiment is clearly for him to be a closer, and he was on a short list of four candidates by the Diamondbacks to be the No. 1 pick overall."

     

    His Career

    Craig Hansen made his major league debut only a few months after being drafted, but he was neither ready for prime time or the next great reliever in Beantown.

    Hansen would spend parts of three seasons with the Red Sox, going 3-5 with a 6.15 ERA and 1.67 WHIP in just over 74 innings of relief. Part of the three-way trade that sent Manny Ramirez to Los Angeles, he struggled in parts of two seasons with Pittsburgh, pitching to a 6.95 ERA and 1.86 WHIP in 22 innings.

    A non-roster invitee to spring training with the New York Mets this season (after spending seven games in the lower levels of the team's minor league system last year), Hansen failed to impress and was released at the end of camp.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Hansen

    • OF Colby Rasmus, St. Louis Cardinals (No. 28)

New York Yankees

4 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Andrew Brackman

    Drafted: 2007 (No. 30 overall) from North Carolina State University

     

    What the Experts Said

    "As an awkward 6-foot-7 16-year-old at Cincinnati's Moeller High, Brackman wasn't considered a top 50 prospect in baseball or basketball. His basketball game blossomed as a senior, and when N.C. State offered him a chance to play both sports, he eagerly accepted.

    "Now a legitimate 6-foot-10, 240 pounds, his upside is considerable. His athleticism helps him repeat his delivery, but he struggles with his balance and release point, leading to erratic command, especially of his secondary stuff. He touched 99 mph in the Cape Cod League in 2006 and again during an early-season outing in Myrtle Beach, S.C., and he pitches at 94 with exceptional plane.

    "His mid-80s spike-curveball is filthy. Brackman's changeup was the pitch that had improved the most this spring, and grades as a third potential plus offering. He's still unrefined, but even without the polish, Brackman shouldn't slide out of the top 10 picks."

     

    His Career

    With the talent befitting the first overall pick in the 2007 draft, Andrew Brackman had two things working against him.

    First, he hired super-agent Scott Boras to represent him. And, per usual, Boras wasted no time in letting people know that Brackman was worthy of a large contract and signing bonus.

    Secondly, his injury history scared some teams off. It was a foregone conclusion that he was going to require Tommy John surgery to repair the recurring problems with his elbow, which he'd undergo roughly two months after the Yankees selected him.

    One-third of the short-lived "Killer B's," along with Manny Banuelos and Delin Betances—a trio of pitchers that were going to be the backbone of the team's rotation of the future—Brackman went 17-35 with a 5.36 ERA in four minor league seasons.

    He appeared in three games out of the Yankees bullpen in 2011, allowing four baserunners in 2.1 innings of work. And after a miserable 2012 in Cincinnati's minor league system, he was released.

    Brackman signed a minor league deal with the Chicago White Sox this past January but has yet to appear in a game with any of the team's affiliates.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Brackman

    • 3B Todd Frazier, Cincinnati Reds (No. 34)
    • C Travis d'Arnaud, Philadelphia Phillies (No. 37)
    • C Josh Donaldson, Chicago Cubs (No. 48)

Tampa Bay Rays

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    The Bust: RHP Wade Townsend

    Drafted: 2004 (No. 8 overall) from Rice University

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Rice's Philip Humber, Jeff Niemann and Townsend went in the first eight picks of the 2004 draft, making them the highest drafted trio of teammates ever. Unlike the other two, however, Townsend didn't sign a lucrative major league contract.

    "Townsend spent April and May working out for clubs, and for the most part showed the same stuff he had in 2004. He wasn't in game shape, so he didn't maintain his velocity past three simulated innings, but he pitched at 90-92 mph with his trademark spike curveball and an effective changeup.

    "Though he has the repertoire to start, most teams project Townsend as a big league reliever because they say his intensity fits best in that role."

     

    His Career

    Townsend appeared to make the right call by going back to school for his senior season. He went 12-0 with a 1.80 ERA, holding the opposition to a .181 batting average against him en route to being named the 2004 Western Athletic Conference Pitcher of the Year.

    But injuries took their toll—he'd miss the entire 2006 season due to surgery—and by the time Tampa Bay released him in 2009, he had undergone three arm surgeries, compiling a 7-21 record, 5.68 ERA and 1.59 WHIP over parts of five minor league seasons, never advancing past Double-A.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Townsend

    • OF Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Pirates (No. 11)
    • OF Jay Bruce, Cincinnati Reds (No. 12)
    • OF Jacoby Ellsbury, Boston Red Sox (No. 23)
    • RHP Matt Garza, Minnesota Twins (No. 25)
    • RHP Clay Buchholz, Boston Red Sox (No. 42)

Toronto Blue Jays

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    The Bust: SS Russ Adams

    Drafted: 2002 (No. 14 overall) from the University of North Carolina

     

    What the Experts Said

    "There's nothing flashy about Adams, the Cape Cod League's top prospect last summer, and his overall tools don't quite compare to those of South Carolina's Drew Meyer. Yet Adams should be no worse than the second-highest college position player drafted, possibly going to the Athletics at No. 16.

    "He's an instinctive player who fits perfectly into the leadoff role because he works counts, makes contact, steals bases and always plays hard. He has a line-drive swing and could have a little pop once he gets stronger.

    "He's similar to Chris Burke, the Tennessee shortstop whom the Astros drafted 10th overall in 2001. Burke was a step quicker and has more juice in his bat, but Adams bats left-handed and both have great makeup."

     

    His Career

    Maybe he was more of a disappointment than an outright bust, but Russ Adams never lived up to the expectations that came with not only being a high first-round pick, but from his first 161 games in the major leagues.

    Promoted to the big leagues in 2004, Adams was a regular for Toronto the following season. Over his first 161 games with the Blue Jays, he hit .262 with a .730 OPS, 12 home runs and 73 RBI. Solid numbers for a middle infielder.

    Then it all fell apart.

    Adams forgot how to make accurate throws to any base, becoming a major defensive liability, and he appeared in only 125 major league games from 2006 through 2009, hitting .221 with five home runs and 40 RBI.

    He last played for the Buffalo Bisons, the Triple-A affiliate of the New York Mets, in 2011, hitting .180 with one home run and five RBI in 23 games.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Adams

    • 1B Nick Swisher, Oakland Athletics (No. 16)
    • LHP Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies (No. 17)
    • OF Denard Span, Minnesota Twins (No. 20)
    • RHP Matt Cain, San Francisco Giants (No. 25)

Atlanta Braves

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    The Bust: RHP Luis Atilano

    Drafted: 2003 (No. 35 overall) from Gabriela Mistral HS (San Juan, PR)

     

    What the Experts Said

    "Atilano received the highest Major League Scouting Bureau grade of any Puerto Rican, a tribute to his projectability. He's very thin at 6-foot-3 and 170 pounds, and could boost his 88-91 mph fastball to 94 if he put on 20 pounds. He has a loose arm, averaging breaking ball and feel for a changeup."


    His Career

    Luis Atilano spent four rather underwhelming seasons in Atlanta's minor league system, never advancing past High-A before being traded to Washington in exchange for Daryle Ward at the end of August in 2006.

    Atilano wound up starting 16 games for the Nationals in 2010, going 6-7 with a 5.15 ERA and 1.49 WHIP before being released at the end of the 2011 season.

    He signed a minor league deal with Cincinnati before the 2012 season, appearing in only two games before becoming injured and eventually suspended for 50 games by MLB for violating baseball's minor league drug program.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Atilano

    • OF Adam Jones, Seattle Mariners (No. 37)

Miami Marlins

8 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Brett Sinkbeil

    Drafted: 2006 (No. 19 overall) from Missouri State University

     

     

    What The Experts Said

    "On his best nights, area scouts say Sinkbeil has outclassed any college pitcher in the Midwest, including No. 3 overall prospect Brad Lincoln of Houston. Some of them would take him over the region's other top college-age arms (Scherzer, Joba Chamberlain and Luke Hochevar).

    "While that won't happen, Sinkbeil still should go in the bottom of the first round if he can show he's healthy."

     

    His Career

    Named one of Baseball America's top 100 prospects list before both the 2007 and 2008 seasons, Sinkbeil continued to battle injuries and ineffectiveness, never living up to even the mildest expectations.

    He went 21-32 in parts of six minor league seasons, pitching to a 4.85 ERA and 1.51 WHIP in 514 innings—the last 84 in Pittsburgh's farm system. Sinkbeil came out of Florida's bullpen three times in 2010, allowing two hits and three earned runs in two innings of work, walking five and striking out one.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Sinkbeil

    • RHP Ian Kennedy, New York Yankees (No. 21)
    • RHP Daniel Bard, Boston Red Sox (No. 28)
    • RHP Joba Chamberlain, New York Yankees (No. 41)
    • RHP Chris Perez, St. Louis Cardinals (No. 42)

New York Mets

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    The Bust: RHP Philip Humber

    Drafted: 2004 (No. 3 overall) from Rice University

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Humber, who won the 2003 College World Series clincher against Stanford with a complete game five-hitter, might be the safest pick among the three Rice aces. He was the first to join the Owls' weekend rotation, doing so a month into his freshman season, and has been the most consistent.

    "An 11-game winner for the third straight year, Humber ranked among NCAA Division I leaders in victories, ERA (1.80), strikeout-walk ratio (141-33 in 105 innings) and strikeouts per nine innings (12.1) in mid-May. He does it with three plus pitches: a 90-94 mph fastball that scrapes 97, a true 12-6 curveball, and a splitter that he uses as a changeup.

    "Strong and durable at 6-foot-4 and 210 pounds, he has been injury-free and has the most resilient arm of the Rice first-rounders. There's a little recoil in his delivery but it's not a huge issue. It will be an upset if Humber doesn't go in the first six picks of the draft."

     

    His Career

    To be fair, Humber has had far more success than his teammate at Rice, Wade Townsend, who we looked at earlier with Tampa Bay. As for Jeff Niemann, the third member of Rice's rotation, that's another story.

    Humber was part of the package that the Mets sent to Minnesota in exchange for Johan Santana back in 2008. He was released in 2009 and bounced around baseball, moving from Kansas City to Oakland to Chicago (AL), where he threw a perfect game in 2012.

    Yet he was so bad in 2013—0-8 with a 9.59 ERA and 2.02 WHIP in nine games—that the pitching-starved Houston Astros had to designate him for assignment. In four games for Triple-A Oklahoma City, he has a 6.14 ERA and 1.91 WHIP.

    Over parts of eight seasons in the majors, Humber has gone 16-23 with a 5.34 ERA and 1.42 WHIP.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Humber

    • RHP Homer Bailey, Cincinnati Reds (No. 7)
    • RHP Jered Weaver, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (No. 12)
    • 3B Billy Butler, Kansas City Royals (No. 14)
    • LHP Glen Perkins, Minnesota Twins (No. 22)
    • RHP Phil Hughes, New York Yankees (No. 23)
    • LHP Gio Gonzalez, Chicago White Sox (No. 38)
    • RHP Huston Street, Oakland Athletics (No. 40)

Philadelphia Phillies

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    The Bust: OF Greg Golson

    Drafted: 2004 (No. 21 overall) from Connally HS (Connally, TX)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Golson's package of five tools is as attractive as any in the draft, and there's really nothing he can't do. His most obvious tool is his top-of-the-line speed, which takes him from the right side of the plate to first base in as quick as 3.8 seconds. He has the bat speed and hand-eye coordination to hit for power and average. Defensively, both his range and arm are plus tools."

     

    His Career

    Golson definitely had speed, averaging 24 stolen bases a year over parts of five seasons in Philadelphia's farm system. But the rest of his offensive game never really developed. Averaging 125 strikeouts a season while hitting only .265 with nine home runs and 45 RBI per year, he was dealt to Texas for John Mayberry Jr. after the 2008 season.

    Currently playing for Colorado's Triple-A team, Golson owns a career .195/.214/.244 slash line in 40 major league games, 33 of them with the New York Yankees.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Golson

    • LHP Glen Perkins, Minnesota Twins (No. 22)
    • RHP Phil Hughes, New York Yankees (No. 23)
    • LHP Gio Gonzalez, Chicago White Sox (No. 38)
    • RHP Huston Street, Oakland Athletics (No. 40)

Washington Nationals/Montreal Expos

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    The Bust: RHP Clint Everts

    Drafted: 2002 (No. 5 overall) from Cypress Falls HS in Houston, TX

     

    What The Experts Said 

    "With his switch-hitting ability, plus speed and stellar defensive play, Everts might be the second-best shortstop in the nation after Virginia high schooler B.J. Upton.

    "Yet he'll almost certainly be taken as a pitcher, and one scouting director with an early pick says Everts could be the best arm to come out of the draft.

    "He can't match the quality of (teammate Scott) Kazmir's stuff, but Kazmir can't equal Everts' projectability or the ease with which he throws. Everts is just 17 and could get much stronger as he adds to his 6-foot-2, 170-pound frame. His curveball is the best among high school pitchers, and he has a 91-94 mph fastball and above-average changeup.

    "Scouts dream about pitchers with his kind of quick arm action. 'He's the sleeper of the whole draft,' one scouting director said. 'He's going to make someone very happy.'"

     

    His Career

    Teams may have been better off keeping Clint Everts as a shortstop, as he's had far more success at the plate (1-for-3 with a RBI) than he has on the mound.  

    Over 11 minor league seasons in three different farm systems (Montreal/Washington, New York [NL] and Toronto), Everts has gone 41-46 with a 4.10 ERA and 1.46 WHIP, pitching primarily as a reliever.

    In 11 minor league games split between Double-A and Triple-A this season, the 28-year-old has gone 0-2 with an 8.04 ERA and 1.98 WHIP, walking 16 batters in 15.2 innings of work while striking out only eight.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Everts

    • RHP Zack Greinke, Kansas City Royals (No. 6)
    • 1B Prince Fielder, Milwaukee Brewers (No. 7)
    • 1B Nick Swisher, Oakland Athletics (No. 16)
    • LHP Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies (No. 17)
    • OF Denard Span, Minnesota Twins (No. 20)
    • RHP Matt Cain, San Francisco Giants (No. 25)

Chicago White Sox

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    The Bust: OF Brian Anderson

    Drafted: 2003 (No. 15 overall) from the University of Arizona

     

     

    What the Experts Said

    "Anderson improved his draft worth as much as any player in the country. He was hardly on the radar at the start of the year after an injury-plagued 2002 season and is now knocking on the door of the first round.

    "His numbers tell the story. A .275 hitter with five homers and six stolen bases in 2002, the 6-foot-3, 200-pounder raised his average more than 100 points while tripling his home run and stolen base totals.

    "He was the best everyday player in the Pacific-10 Conference. Anderson worked closely with Wildcats coach Andy Lopez to revamp his swing and entire approach to hitting. The result has been better rhythm and bat speed. All other parts of his game have come together as well.

    "He's a solid center fielder with above-average arm strength. He did not pitch this year after leading the Wildcats with four saves a year ago, though his fastball has been clocked as high as 94 mph. With his improved showing offensively, his performance has finally matched his considerable tools."

     

     

    His Career

    Anderson moved quickly through Chicago's minor league system, making his major league debut in 2005 and spending the better part of four years in Chicago, hitting .225 with 20 home runs and 75 RBI over 355 games.

    An above-average fielder, he simply couldn't consistently hit major league pitching, and when the White Sox demoted him to Triple-A Charlotte in 2009, manager Ozzie Guillen was branded a racist by some for keeping Dewayne Wise over the team's former first-round pick.

    Shortly thereafter, he was traded to the Boston Red Sox for Mark Kotsay. With a career slash line of .227/.290/.370 in parts of five big league seasons, Anderson abandoned his bat for a rosin bag, attempting to remake himself as a reliever.

    In 27 minor league games (four starts), he went 1-1 with a 1.74 ERA and 0.87 WHIP over 31 innings of work in the minor league systems of Kansas City and New York (AL). Colorado signed him to a minor league contract in 2012, but he never appeared in a game before being released.

     

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Anderson

    • OF David Murphy, Boston Red Sox (No. 17)
    • RHP Chad Billingsley, Los Angeles Dodgers (No. 24)
    • OF Carlos Quentin, Arizona Diamondbacks (No. 29)
    • C Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Atlanta Braves (No. 36)
    • OF Adam Jones, Seattle Mariners (No. 37)

Cleveland Indians

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    The Bust: RHP Jeremy Sowers

    Drafted: 2004 (No. 5 overall) from Vanderbilt University

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Sowers pounds the zone with four pitches: an accurate, active fastball he throws anywhere from 85-91 mph, a solid-average slider and curveball, and a changeup with good movement that he uses sparingly. His consistency and makeup impress scouts nearly as much as his stuff and command."

     

    His Career

    Jeremy Sowers moved quickly through Cleveland's minor league system, going a combined 14-4 with a 2.37 ERA and 1.07 WHIP and reaching Triple-A in his first pro season.

    He had a successful rookie campaign for the Indians in 2006, going 7-4 with a 3.57 ERA and 1.19 WHIP in 14 starts and tossing consecutive shutouts against Minnesota and Seattle in the process.

    That would be the highlight of his career. In 58 games for Cleveland from 2007 through 2009—all but one of them as a starter—he went 11-26 with a 5.63 ERA and 1.51 WHIP.

    You can currently watch Sowers take the ball every fifth day for the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs of the independent Atlantic League, where he's gone 1-3 with a 4.30 ERA in eight starts.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Sowers

    • RHP Homer Bailey, Cincinnati Reds (No. 7)
    • RHP Jered Weaver, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (No. 12)
    • 3B Billy Butler, Kansas City Royals (No. 14)
    • LHP Glen Perkins, Minnesota Twins (No. 22)
    • RHP Phil Hughes, New York Yankees (No. 23)
    • LHP Gio Gonzalez, Chicago White Sox (No. 38)
    • RHP Huston Street, Oakland Athletics (No. 40)

Detroit Tigers

14 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Kyle Sleeth

    Drafted: 2003 (No. 3 overall) from Wake Forest University

     

    What The Experts Said

    "The consensus is that Sleeth is better than Bryan Bullington, the No. 1 overall pick a year ago, though he won't go that high in this draft. He should be no worse than the second college pitcher drafted. 

    "Consistency is all that stands between him becoming a front-line starter in the major leagues."

     

    His Career

    The first pitcher selected in the 2003 draft, Sleeth advanced to Double-A in his first pro season, going a combined 9-8 with a 4.93 ERA and 1.39 WHIP in 24 starts. Then injury struck, and he missed the entire 2005 season as he recovered from Tommy John surgery.

    Unlike many of the success stories that we hear about as pitchers return to action from the procedure, Sleeth struggled badly. In 38 games between the 2006 and 2007 seasons, he went 3-13 with an 8.08 ERA and 1.88 WHIP, walking nearly as many batters (64) as he struck out (70).

    Only 25 years old, he retired from the game towards the end of spring training in 2008.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Sleeth

    • OF Nick Markakis, Baltimore Orioles (No. 7)
    • LHP Paul Maholm, Pittsburgh Pirates (No. 8)
    • LHP John Danks, Texas Rangers (No. 9)
    • 2B Aaron Hill, Toronto Blue Jays (No. 13)
    • RHP Chad Billingsley, Los Angeles Dodgers (No. 24)
    • OF Carlos Quentin, Arizona Diamondbacks (No. 29)
    • C Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Atlanta Braves (No. 36)
    • OF Adam Jones, Seattle Mariners (No. 37)

Kansas City Royals

15 of 31

    The Bust: OF Chris Lubanski

    Drafted: 2003 (No. 5 overall) from Kennedy-Kenrick Catholic HS (Norristown, PA)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "He has four tools that grade out average or better, and even his arm, his weakest tool, may become average. His hitting ability is obvious, but his best tool is his speed.

    "He's been timed in less than 6.5 seconds in the 60-yard dash. He has long strides and glides to balls in center; it's a sight to behold watching him leg out triples, a frequent occurrence.

    "His power will evolve as he fills out his 6-foot-3, 185-pound frame."

     

    His Career

    Chris Lubanski spent nine years in the minor leagues, achieving his greatest success in 2005 with Kansas City's High-A affiliate, the High Desert Mavericks. Over 126 games, he hit .301 with 28 home runs and 116 RBI while swiping 14 bases.

    He'd never reach that same level of success again, retiring after the 2011 season with a career .277/.344/.810 slash line and no regrets, as he told Rick O'Brien of the Philadelphia Inquirer:

    There's always the what-if factor. What if I had done this, what if I had done that. But I worked hard the entire time and performed well.

    I was an all-star at every level of the minor leagues. I don't think there's much more I could have done to make it to the major-league level.

    He's currently the head varsity baseball coach at Springside Chestnut Hill Academy in Philadelphia.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Lubanski

    • OF Nick Markakis, Baltimore Orioles (No. 7)
    • LHP Paul Maholm, Pittsburgh Pirates (No. 8)
    • LHP John Danks, Texas Rangers (No. 9)
    • 2B Aaron Hill, Toronto Blue Jays (No. 13)
    • RHP Chad Billingsley, Los Angeles Dodgers (No. 24)
    • OF Carlos Quentin, Arizona Diamondbacks (No. 29)
    • C Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Atlanta Braves (No. 36)
    • OF Adam Jones, Seattle Mariners (No. 37)

Minnesota Twins

16 of 31

    The Bust: 3B Matt Moses

    Drafted: 2003 (No. 5 overall) from Mills E. Godwin HS (Richmond, VA)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Some scouts say the left-handed-hitting Moses has the best high school bat in the draft. He has an excellent swing path and smooth line-drive stroke, and should hit for average and power down the road. The biggest question is his position. Regardless of where he lines up on defense, Moses' bat will play."

     

    His Career

    Shortly after getting drafted, Matt Moses underwent minor heart surgery to repair a small defect. Just over a week later, he was playing for the GCL Twins in Rookie Ball, hitting .385 with a .909 OPS and 11 RBI in 18 games.

    That was as good as it got, as he struggled at every other level in Minnesota's farm system, with the bulk of his playing time coming with the team's Double-A affiliate, the New Britain Rock Cats.

    Over 427 games with New Britain, Moses posted a .238/.293/.364 slash line with 35 home runs and 224 RBI. He wqs out of baseball by the time he celebrated his 25th birthday.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Moses

    • OF Nick Markakis, Baltimore Orioles (No. 7)
    • LHP Paul Maholm, Pittsburgh Pirates (No. 8)
    • LHP John Danks, Texas Rangers (No. 9)
    • 2B Aaron Hill, Toronto Blue Jays (No. 13)
    • RHP Chad Billingsley, Los Angeles Dodgers (No. 24)
    • OF Carlos Quentin, Arizona Diamondbacks (No. 29)
    • C Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Atlanta Braves (No. 36)
    • OF Adam Jones, Seattle Mariners (No. 37)

Chicago Cubs

17 of 31

    The Bust: OF Ryan Harvey

    Drafted: 2003 (No. 6 overall) from Dunedin HS (Dunedin, FL)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "After missing Dunedin High's first 17 games, he has become one of three candidates to go No. 1 overall to the Devil Rays. Harvey draws comparisons to two-time National League MVP Dale Murphy because of his huge athletic frame (6-foot-5, 215 pounds) and top-of-the-line power potential.

    "More than just a slugger, Harvey runs well and is a potential Gold Glove right fielder. Some scouts believe he has the best overall package of tools in the nation, and he shouldn't get past the Royals and Cubs, who choose fifth and sixth.'

     

    His Career

    Built more like a linebacker than an outfielder, Harvey flashed raw power often, hitting 155 home runs over an eight-year career in Chicago's minor league system, twice hitting 20 bombs in a season.

    But when you got past the power, you were left with a player who hit .244, struggled to get on base consistently (a career .297 on-base percentage in the Cubs' system) and struck out nearly five times for every walk that he drew.

    He never advanced past Double-A and was released by the team after the 2009 season.

    Harvey has spent the last two seasons with the Lancaster Barnstormers in the independent Atlantic League, continuing to flash his power and strike out at a ridiculous rate.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Harvey

    • OF Nick Markakis, Baltimore Orioles (No. 7)
    • LHP Paul Maholm, Pittsburgh Pirates (No. 8)
    • LHP John Danks, Texas Rangers (No. 9)
    • 2B Aaron Hill, Toronto Blue Jays (No. 13)
    • RHP Chad Billingsley, Los Angeles Dodgers (No. 24)
    • OF Carlos Quentin, Arizona Diamondbacks (No. 29)
    • C Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Atlanta Braves (No. 36)
    • OF Adam Jones, Seattle Mariners (No. 37)

Cincinnati Reds

18 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Chris Gruler

    Drafted: 2002 (No. 3 overall) from Liberty Union HS (Oakley, CA)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "He thrived in his final start in front of nine members of the Reds' front office and scouts from several teams in the top 10, pumping 95 mph heat in the seventh inning. He sits in the 91-94 mph range, touching 94-95. He's been as high as 96-97 mph and his two-seamer has good riding life.

    "His best pitch is a 12-to-6 hammer curveball that he spins for strikes, and he's shown a feel for a changeup and an occasional splitter.

    "Rated as a fringe first-rounder last summer when he threw in the high 80s, Gruler won't make it out of the top 10 now, and maybe not the top five."

     

    His Career

    Compared to Tom Seaver by Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench, who added that Gruler had "a better changeup and breaking ball" than the Hall of Fame starter at the same point in their development, Chris Gruler was doomed to fall short of expectations from the start.

    When you have to undergo three shoulder reconstructions in four years, your baseball career is just doomed.

    That's exactly what happened to Gruler, who threw a total of 92.2 innings over the four years that he played in Cincinnati's minor league system, going 3-5 with a 5.05 ERA and 1.53 WHIP. After his final comeback attempt in 2006, Gruler's career came to an end.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Gruler

    • RHP Zack Greinke, Kansas City Royals (No. 6)
    • 1B Prince Fielder, Milwaukee Brewers (No. 7)
    • 1B Nick Swisher, Oakland Athletics (No. 16)
    • LHP Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies (No. 17)
    • OF Denard Span, Minnesota Twins (No. 20)
    • RHP Matt Cain, San Francisco Giants (No. 25)

Milwaukee Brewers

19 of 31

    The Bust: LHP Evan Frederickson

    Drafted: 2008 (No. 35 overall) from the University of San Francisco

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Some scouts say Frederickson, at an imposing 6-foot-6, 238 pounds, has better stuff than Dons lefty Aaron Poreda, the White Sox's 2007 first-round pick.

    "They both have lower arm slots, and while Frederickson doesn't reach the high 90s as Poreda can, he does have a plus fastball, touching 95 and at times sitting in the 91-93 range. His slider gives him a weapon Poreda never had; it's a power pitch, a hybrid slurve that has some depth and is thrown in the low 80s. When it's on, he makes lefthanded hitters look bat.

    "Scouts view him as a reliever, but perhaps more than just a lefty setup man. He could go as high as the second round."

     

    His Career

    Milwaukee knew it was taking a chance when the team handed Evan Frederickson a $1.01 million contract despite the left-hander's inability to control his pitches. He walked 139 batters in 132 innings split between two college teams.

    But his ability to throw heat consistently was too much for the Brewers to pass up, and the team paid the price, both literally and figuratively.

    Released after only three professional seasons, Frederickson went 6-15 with a 5.47 ERA and 1.91 WHIP over 197 innings of work, striking out 198 but walking an insanely high 186 batters. He never advanced past High-A.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Frederickson

    • RHP Lance Lynn, St. Louis Cardinals (No. 39)
    • LHP Wade Miley, Arizona Diamondbacks (No. 43)

Pittsburgh Pirates

20 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Bryan Bullington

    Drafted: 2002 (No. 1 overall) from Ball State University

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Bullington has been labeled first-round material since he earned all-conference honors and led the Mid-American Conference in strikeouts as a freshman. His stock went higher this spring when his velocity improved; he changed his arm slot and tightened up his breaking ball.

    "He pitches at 92-94 mph with good life and displays pinpoint control on the black. He can reach back for 95-96 mph heat. After walking just 19 in 108 innings as a sophomore, he registered 126 strikeouts in 94 innings while issuing 17 walks this year. His 2.11 ERA led the MAC, and he had not allowed a home run.

    "Bullington's release point has varied from a low three-quarter to a high three-quarter. After settling with a straight three-quarters slot he developed a nasty, hard slider. He's a polished pitcher with a big league body, leading most scouts to believe he'll move rapidly up the ladder in pro ball."

     

    His Career

    Bryan Bullington looked the part of future ace in his first professional season, going 13-3 with a 2.52 ERA and 1.15 WHIP while advancing to High-A.

    While he wasn't a power pitcher who racked up gaudy strikeout totals, Bullington progressed smoothly through Pittsburgh's farm system, reaching Triple-A in 2005. By the time the Pirates called him up later that season, he owned a 34-17 record, 3.26 ERA and 1.26 WHIP in 392 minor league innings.

    Then the wheels fell off, with Bullington becoming lessand less effective against Triple-A pitching. He was designated for assignment and claimed on waivers by Cleveland in July of 2008; Toronto claimed him off of waivers from Cleveland in October of the same year. 

    One more shot at big league success came with Kansas City in 2010—a shot that he failed to capitalize on, though he recorded the only win of his major league career with the Royals, throwing eight innings of two-hit, shutout ball against the Yankees.

    When Kansas City released him after the season, Bullington had gone 1-9 with a 5.62 ERA and 1.58 WHIP in 81.2 major league innings.

    But his story has a happy ending, as Bullington has found a home—and the success that eluded him as a professional in the United States—over in Japan. He's made 70 starts for the Hiroshima Carp since the beginning of the 2011 season, going 22-30 with a 2.76 ERA and 1.12 WHIP.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Bullington

    • SS B.J. Upton, Tampa Bay Rays (No. 2)
    • RHP Zack Greinke, Kansas City Royals (No. 6)
    • 1B Prince Fielder, Milwaukee Brewers (No. 7)
    • 1B Nick Swisher, Oakland Athletics (No. 16)
    • LHP Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies (No. 17)
    • OF Denard Span, Minnesota Twins (No. 20)
    • RHP Matt Cain, San Francisco Giants (No. 25)

St. Louis Cardinals

21 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Chris Lambert

    Drafted: 2004 (No. 19 overall) from Boston College

     

    What The Experts Said

    "After posting a 2.12 ERA in the Cape Cod League last summer, he was considered a potential early first-round pick coming into the spring. But inconsistent performance and some bad luck may drop him into the second.

    "He was 5-4, 3.53 this season, though his peripheral numbers are just as strong as past years, including a .203 opponent average. Lambert has a strong frame and quick arm action that enables him to produce fastballs in the 90-96 mph range.

    "Command of all his pitches has been an issue, and he had 44 walks in 71 innings this spring. His changeup is a fair pitch, but he slows his delivery when he throws it and drops his arm angle. Lambert has a full-effort delivery and needs to develop a consistent arm angle and smooth out his mechanics."

     

    His Career

    Three years after being drafted, Lambert became the player-to-be-named-later in a trade St. Louis made with Detroit to acquire veteran starter Mike Maroth.

    Two years later, he was claimed off of waivers from Detroit by Baltimore, with whom he'd throw his last professional pitch.

    Over 33 major league innings, the majority of which came with the Tigers, Lambert went 1-3 with a 7.36 ERA and 1.97 WHIP. His minor league numbers were better, but mediocre: 41-43 with a 4.44 ERA and 1.42 WHIP in just over 680 innings of work.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Lambert

    • LHP Glen Perkins, Minnesota Twins (No. 22)
    • RHP Phil Hughes, New York Yankees (No. 23)
    • LHP Gio Gonzalez, Chicago White Sox (No. 38)
    • RHP Huston Street, Oakland Athletics (No. 40)

Houston Astros

22 of 31

    The Bust: C Maxwell Sapp

    Drafted: 2006 (No. 23 overall) from Bishop Moore HS (Orlando, FL)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Scouts in Florida are split on whether Sapp's catch and throw skills play behind the plate, but his bat should play anywhere. He's big and strong, but his body doesn't exude athleticism and agility. He's barrel-chested and thick, and he elevated his stock considerably this spring when he came out in good shape.

    "But even those scouts who predict he'll have to move to first base like his bat. He has plus raw power, good plate coverage and a fair approach at the plate. He reduced a high leg kick he uses as a trigger, but still has too much of an uppercut swing.

    "He could become a prolific college power hitter if he winds up at Florida State, but he's expected to sign if he's chosen in the top three rounds. His power potential makes it likely a club will take him in that range."

     

    His Career

    Maxwell Sapp struggled through each of his three seasons as a professional, hitting .224 with seven home runs and 81 RBI in 210 career games, never advancing past Single-A.

    A nasty battle with meningitis found him hospitalized and effectively ended his career before it ever really had a chance to begin.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Sapp

    • RHP Daniel Bard, Boston Red Sox (No. 28)
    • RHP Joba Chamberlain, New York Yankees (No. 41)
    • RHP Chris Perez, St. Louis Cardinals (No. 42)

Los Angeles Angels

23 of 31

    The Bust: SS Brandon Wood

    Drafted: 2003 (No. 23 overall) from Horizon HS (Scottsdale, AZ)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "As a high school freshman, Wood was so weak physically that a DH was used for his spot in the batting order. Wood answered all questions about his physique with an outstanding senior year.

    "He went on a major conditioning program in the offseason and hit .504 with 20 home runs to lead his school, Horizon High, to a top 25 national ranking. His surge dramatically raised his profile as a draft pick, to a point that he now is a first-round candidate.

    "He drives balls consistently now, the one missing ingredient in his game before this season. The Texas recruit always has been a slick-fielding shortstop. He has the hands and feet for the position and his arm works well."

     

    His Career

    Brandon Wood has hit at every level of the minor leagues that he's played at, sitting with a career slash line of .282/.347/.518 with 175 home runs and 629 RBI in 921 minor league games. That includes a .310/.337/.452 line in 21 games with Baltimore's Triple-A team this season.

    It's when he gets to the big leagues that the problems start—and it's the reason that the 28-year-old is now playing with his fourth organization in the past three years. In 272 big league games, Wood has hit .186 with a .513 OPS, 18 home runs and 64 RBI.

    He's the mythical "Quadruple-A player"—too talented for the minor leagues but not talented enough to succeed against the best of the best.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Wood

    • RHP Chad Billingsley, Los Angeles Dodgers (No. 24)
    • OF Carlos Quentin, Arizona Diamondbacks (No. 29)
    • C Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Atlanta Braves (No. 36)
    • OF Adam Jones, Seattle Mariners (No. 37)

Oakland Athletics

24 of 31

    The Bust: C Landon Powell

    Drafted: 2004 (No. 24 overall) from the University of South Carolina

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Powell has been a national story since he took the GED test and sneaked through the 2000 draft unnoticed as a high school junior. He ended up at South Carolina after no pro club signed him as a free agent.

    "He got too big and soft last season, and clubs still fear his body could go south. Powell has firmed up this season with the help of a personal trainer and shown several above-average tools.

    "He's had his best season at the plate, ranking among SEC leaders in batting, home runs, RBI and slugging percentage. Stats-savvy organizations are particularly high on him."

     

    His Career

    Originally paired with Kurt Suzuki at Single-A Vancouver, it was anybody's guess which one would take hold of the reins and become Oakland's catcher of the future. A torn ACL cost Powell his first full professional season, allowing Suzuki to gain an edge that he never relinquished.

    Despite spending the bulk of his career in the extremely hitter-friendly Pacific Coast League, Powell has managed to hit only .234 with 30 home runs and 104 RBI over 224 games with the Triple-A affiliates of Oakland, Houston and, in 2013, the New York Mets.

    He didn't fare much better in his three stints in Oakland, hitting only .207 with 10 home runs and 45 RBI in 123 games at the sport's highest level.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Powell

    • LHP Gio Gonzalez, Chicago White Sox (No. 38)

Seattle Mariners

25 of 31

    The Bust: C Jeff Clement

    Drafted: 2005 (No. 3 overall) from the University of Southern California

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Clement enjoyed a storied high school career in small-town Iowa, setting the national career high school home run record with 75. He generates light-tower power with a short, compact left-handed swing. He stays inside the ball well and gets excellent backspin.

    "As a major league hitter, he projects to hit .270-.280 with 30-35 home runs. Unlike former USC catcher Eric Munson, a powerful left-handed-hitting catcher who was the third overall pick in 1999, Clement won't require a position switch."


    His Career

    Jeff Clement moved quickly through Seattle's minor league system, making his major league debut two years after he was drafted, where he hit .375 with two home runs and three RBI in 16 at-bats.

    That taste of success was fleeting, however, as he hit only .227 with five home runs and 23 RBI in an extended stint as Seattle's starting catcher in 2008. Clement found himself shipped to Pittsburgh at the trade deadline in 2009 as part of the package that bought Ian Snell and Jack Wilson to Seattle.

    The Pirates tried Clement out at first base in 2010 but were met with equally disappointing results: a .207 batting average, seven home runs and 12 RBI over 54 games. After another failed stint in 2012 that saw him pick up only three hits in 22 at-bats, the Pirates let him walk as a free agent.

    He's currently splitting time between first base and the designated hitter spot for Minnesota's Triple-A club, struggling to produce, with a .201 batting average, seven home runs and 18 RBI in 52 games.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Clement

    • 3B Ryan Zimmerman, Washington Nationals (No. 4)
    • 3B Ryan Braun, Milwaukee Brewers (No. 5)
    • SS Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado Rockies (No. 7)
    • OF Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Pirates (No. 11)
    • OF Jay Bruce, Cincinnati Reds (No. 12)
    • OF Jacoby Ellsbury, Boston Red Sox (No. 23)
    • RHP Matt Garza, Minnesota Twins (No. 25)
    • RHP Clay Buchholz, Boston Red Sox (No. 42)

Texas Rangers

26 of 31

    The Bust: LHP Kasey Kiker

    Drafted: 2006 (No. 12 overall) from Russell County HS (Seale, AL)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Kiker is one of the nation's most electric lefthanders and has a remarkable track record for a high school pitcher. As a 15-year-old in 2003, he was the winning pitcher for Team USA when it won a gold medal in the World Youth Championship in Taiwan.

    "He was the ace of national champion Russell County High's staff in 2005 as a junior, going 12-1, 0.52 with 173 strikeouts and 24 walks in 94 innings. Kiker appeared in the Aflac All-American Classic in August and numerous other high-profile showcases and tournaments, showing guile and aggressiveness each time out.

    "His velocity fluctuated throughout the spring, and his most impressive outing might have come in early May when he pitched at 93 with late life and command of his hard breaking ball and changeup. Kiker carves up hitters with power stuff. His 76-78 mph breaking ball has 1-to-7 tilt with tight spin, and his changeup is more consistent and rates as a present above-average offering."

     

    His Career

    Kiker got a $1.6 million signing bonus from the Rangers in 2006 and promptly lost seven of his first 16 games, pitching to a 4.13 ERA and 1.51 WHIP with Low-A Spokane.

    While he improved the following season with Single-A Clinton, going 7-4 with a 2.90 ERA and 1.30 WHIP, Kiker struggled with his command and location throughout his six-year stint in the team's minor league system.

    Released following the 2011 season, Kiker finished his Rangers career with a 23-31 record, 4.53 ERA and 1.51 WHIP over 481 innings of work, walking more than five batters per nine innings of work.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Kiker

    • RHP Ian Kennedy, New York Yankees (No. 21)
    • RHP Daniel Bard, Boston Red Sox (No. 28)
    • RHP Joba Chamberlain, New York Yankees (No. 41)
    • RHP Chris Perez, St. Louis Cardinals (No. 42)

Arizona Diamondbacks

27 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Matt Torra

    Drafted: 2005 (No. 31 overall) from the University of Massachusetts

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Torra is the top talent in New England and could be a prime target for the Red Sox, who have six picks before the start of the second round. But their first doesn't come until 23rd overall, and Torra was rising so fast this spring that he may not be around.

    "He should move quickly through the pro ranks as well, and possibly even to Double-A by the end of the summer, because he's one of the most complete pitchers in the draft.

    "Torra has learned how to control the pace of a game much better this year and didn't give up a home run in 95 innings, while posting a Division I-best 1.14 ERA--a sharp drop from a 4.90 ERA in 2004. He gave up only 56 hits altogether and walked 16 while holding opponents to a .172 average.

    "Despite those numbers, he was just 6-3 as he was the lone bright spot on a team that went 16-33 overall. He pitched several games with pitch counts of more than 140 or 150 pitches--a workload that raised a few eyebrows among scouts."

     

    His Career

    Those who had concerns about Matt Torra's heavy workload in college were proven right when he was shut down only 10 innings into his professional career with what was eventually diagnosed as a torn labrum in his throwing shoulder.

    Limited to only 25 innings the following season, Torra fell behind in his development and has been trying to catch up since. After six-plus seasons in the organization, Arizona sold Torra to Tampa Bay near the trade deadline in 2011.

    While he went 12-7 with a 4.10 ERA and 1.18 WHIP over 147 innings with Triple-A Durham in 2012, the Rays elected not to re-sign him after the season. He's currently pitching for Washington's Triple-A club in Syracuse, where he's gone 0-2 with a 6.19 ERA and 1.50 WHIP in three starts.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Torra

    • RHP Clay Buchholz, Boston Red Sox (No. 42)
    • SS Jed Lowie, Boston Red Sox (No. 45)

Colorado Rockies

28 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Greg Reynolds

    Drafted: 2006 (No. 2 overall) from Stanford University

     

    What The Experts Said

    "Reynolds entered Stanford hyped as the next great Cardinal starter and after struggling for most of two seasons he began to justify that billing this spring.

    "He put together a four-start stretch that included consecutive complete games against Arizona State, California (beating Brandon Morrow) and Washington (beating Tim Lincecum).

    "The Arizona State start opened eyes, as Reynolds pumped his fastball up to 94 mph as late as the ninth inning. One veteran scout brought up Mark Prior when discussing Reynolds because of his rare above-average fastball command for a college pitcher and for his size."

     

    His Career

    Despite being limited to under 100 innings of work in his first two professional seasons due to shoulder surgery in 2007, Greg Reynolds made his major league debut in 2008. He wasn't ready and got shelled, pitching to an 8.13 ERA and 1.76 ERA in 62 innings of work, walking more batters (26) than he struck out (22).

    A second shoulder surgery in 2009 stunted his development even further, and after another failed stint in the majors with Colorado in 2011, Reynolds was traded to Texas before the 2012 season for Chad Tracy.

    He put up terrible numbers for the Rangers' Triple-A affiliate—a 5.30 ERA and 1.56 WHIP in 27 starts—and wound up signing a minor league contract with Cincinnati before the 2013 season.

    Finally healthy with Triple-A Louisville, Reynolds has gone 6-0 with a 2.65 ERA and 1.14 WHIP in 78 innings of work, primarily as a starter. 

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Reynolds

    • 3B Evan Longoria, Tampa Bay Rays (No. 3)
    • LHP Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers (No. 7)
    • RHP Tim Lincecum, San Francisco Giants (No. 10)
    • RHP Max Scherzer, Arizona Diamondbacks (No. 11)
    • RHP Ian Kennedy, New York Yankees (No. 21)
    • RHP Joba Chamberlain, New York Yankees (No. 41)
    • RHP Chris Perez, St. Louis Cardinals (No. 42)

Los Angeles Dodgers

29 of 31

    The Bust: SS Preston Mattingly

    Drafted: 2006 (No. 31 overall) from Central HS (Evansville, IN)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "For the son of a former batting champion and MVP like Don Mattingly, not to mention a multisport athlete in his own right, shortstop Preston Mattingly didn't get much exposure for most of the spring.

    "He was a well-kept secret among a few scouts, so a lot of clubs didn't get a chance to crosscheck him. An all-state wide receiver in football and a 20-point-a-game scorer in basketball, he has plus speed and is much quicker than his father ever was.

    "He's a 6-foot-3, 200-pound right-handed hitter with bat speed, pop and an advanced approach. The Yankees, for whom Don starred and currently serves as batting coach, are known to have interest in Preston and signed his brother Taylor as a 42nd-round pick in 2003.

    "Other teams in the hunt include the Dodgers, Marlins, Orioles, Red Sox and Twins, and there may be enough competition for Mattingly to drive him into the first five rounds. He'll attend Tennessee if he doesn't turn pro."

     

    His Career

    Though Preston Mattngly had the major league bloodline, he wasn't anywhere near the player that his father, Don Mattingly, was with the New York Yankees in the 1980s and first half of the 1990s.

    After a successful professional debut with the GCL Dodgers in Rookie Ball in 2006, where he hit .290 with an OPS of .725 in 47 games, Mattingly couldn't handle better competition.

    Over the next five seasons, he hit only .225 with 24 home runs and 136 RBI in 416 games, never advancing past High-A. He signed a minor league contract with the Yankees before the 2012 season but was released towards the end of spring training, effectively ending his professional career.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Mattingly

    • RHP Joba Chamberlain, New York Yankees (No. 41)
    • RHP Chris Perez, St. Louis Cardinals (No. 42)

San Diego Padres

30 of 31

    The Bust: SS Matt Bush

    Drafted: 2004 (No. 1 overall) from Mission Bay HS (San Diego, CA)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "The Padres still had Bush in their mix for the No. 1 overall selection this year as late as early May. It may have been for local PR value, but Bush is a legitimate talent and easily the best player in San Diego.

    "At 5-foot-10, his size would be an issue if not for his exceptionally strong arms and legs. His arm is also a special tool. On the mound, his fastball has been clocked consistently at 94 mph and up to 96. His best asset may be his glove. He has outstanding lateral movement, lays out for balls in the hole and is quick at turning the double play.

    "His presence, instincts and makeup also are unquestioned.

    "Not everyone is as sold on his bat or his speed, however. He's more of a contact hitter than a power hitter, but scouts say he should hit better with wood than aluminum. He projects as a .270-.290 hitter."

     

    His Career

    Matt Bush never advanced past High-A with San Diego, with a .219/.294/.276 slash line over 213 games. A failure as a position player, the Padres converted him to a pitcher in 2007, but he injured his elbow and required Tommy John surgery, which cost him all of the 2008 season.

    The Padres designated him for assignment in February of 2009 due to ineffectiveness on the field and issues off of it, and Bush was traded to the Toronto Blue Jays shortly thereafter. Bush once again found himself involved in an off-field issue and was immediately released by Toronto, sitting out all of the 2009 season.

    He resurfaced with the Tampa Bay Rays in 2010 on a minor league deal, but after pitching to a 4.83 ERA and 1.43 WHIP for Double-A Montgomery in 2011, Bush once again found himself in trouble off of the field and was released by the Rays. Nobody would touch him after that.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Bush

    • RHP Justin Verlander, Detroit Tigers (No. 2)
    • RHP Jered Weaver, Los Angles Angels (No. 12)
    • 3B Billy Butler, Kansas City Royals (No. 14)

San Francisco Giants

31 of 31

    The Bust: RHP Craig Whitaker

    Drafted: 2003 (No. 34 overall) from Lufkin HS (Lufkin, TX)

     

    What The Experts Said

    "It's not a good year to be a high school righthander, because it's a risky demographic early in the draft to begin with and this year there are several college-oriented teams that won't give the prep ranks more than a passing glance. But Whitaker should do just fine and find a taker in the mid- to late first round.

    "He finished a 14-strikeout no-hitter in early April with a 94-96 mph fastball, and reached 98 mph in early May. More than just a hard thrower, he has a curveball with plus potential and gets life on his heat from a three-quarters arm angle.

    "He's still growing at 6-foot-4 and 180 pounds and should blossom into a four-pitch pitcher in time."

     

    His Career

    A power arm that the Giants couldn't successfully develop into a major league pitcher, Craig Whitaker spent parts of nine seasons in the team's minor league system, pitching to a 4.42 ERA and 1.51 WHIP over 224 games, primarily out of the bullpen.

    He last pitched with the team's Triple-A affiliate in 2012, posting a 9.28 ERA and 2.06 WHIP while walking 25 and striking out 20 in 21.1 innings of work.

     

    Notable First-Round Picks Taken After Whitaker

    • C Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Atlanta Braves (No. 36)
    • OF Adam Jones, Seattle Mariners (No. 37)

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