Ironman Brasil 2013: Route, Date, Start Time and TV Info

Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse more stories
Ironman Brasil 2013: Route, Date, Start Time and TV Info
image from trijuice.com Twitter

Droves of entrants will attempt to swim 3.8 km, cycle for 180.2 km and run 42.2 miles in an effort to win Ironman Brazil. Most of the participants are amateurs testing their fitness or competing for charity; more than likely, only the professionals will finish.

Ironman events are perhaps the most grueling competitions in the world. 

This ultimate test of physical endurance and mental toughness done South American style is in its 15th year. It will feature athletes from 34 countries vying for the right to stand—if they can—on the podium as the winner.

The competition begins Sunday morning in Florianopolis, Santa Catarina.

Here are the details on the event.

 

When: Sunday, May 26

Where: Florianopolis, Santa Catarina

Start Time: 7 a.m. ET (based on last year's event)

*Information Courtesy of http://www.ironmanbrasil.com

 

 

Favorites

Will Ezequiel Morales repeat as Ironman Brasil winner?

Submit Vote vote to see results

Argentina's Ezequiel Morales won with a total time of 08:22:40 in 2012. While he will be a favorite again this year, he will get a stiff challenge from American Tim O'Donnell.

On the women's side, Hillary Biscay is a veteran of 58 Ironman competitions. She is one of the favorites on the women's side because of her proficiency as a swimmer and cyclist.

Here is a look at the entire professional field per Ironman.com

Professional Men's Field
  • Ezequiel Morales ARG
  • Eduardo Sturla ARG
  • Timothy O’Donnell USA
  • Lucus Cocha ARG
  • Blake Becker USA
  • Raul Furtado BRA
  • Ricardo Ramirez BRA
  • Jose Almagro Valero ESP
  • Marcio roniak BRA
  • Andres Castillo Latorre COL
  • Mauricio Eduardo Beinat ARG
  • Christian Carletto ARG
  • Benjamin Munizaga CHL
  • Keegan Williams NZL
  • Frank Silvestrin BRA
  • Igor Amorelli BRA
  • Victor Del Corral Morales ESP
  • Stefan Schmid DEU
  • Ciro Violin BRA
  • Felipe Manentef BRA
  • Guilherme Manocchio BRA
  • Luiz Francisco BRA
  • Trevor Delsaut MEX
  • Mario de Elias ARG
  • Petr Vabrousek CZE
  • Santiago Alves Ascenço BRA
  • Thiago Dario Vinhal BRA
  • Andrey Lyatskiy RUS

 

Professional Women's Field

  • Haley Chura USA
  • Fernanda Garcia BRA
  • Jacqui Gordon USA
  • Sara Gross CAN
  • Amanda Balding AUT
  • Hillary Biscay USA
  • Mirjam Weerd NLD
  • Arrate Gonzalez ESP
  • Gisele Bertucci BRA
  • Federica Frontinif URY
  • Alessandra Carvalho BRA
  • Silvia Felt DEU
  • Marina de Andrade BRA
  • Jana Candrova CZE
  • Jessie Donavan USA
  • Amanda Stevens USA
  • Ana Lidia Borba BRA
  • Anne Basso MEX
  • Vanessa Gianinni BRA
  • Arianeli da Silveira BRA
  • Nina Pekerman ISR

 

The Three Stages of Ironman Brazil 

 

Stage 1

image from ironmanbrasil.com

The competition begins in the water. The 3.8 km swim near Santa Catarina Island goes in an M-shape beginning near Donna Restaurante. The water should be mild as the temperature in Florianopolis will be in the 60s, per Weather.com.

This year's participants are swimming 1.4 km further than the athletes did at Lake Placid in 2012. This obviously favors the stronger swimmers who can use this stage as a means to build an early lead.


Stage 2

image from ironmanbrasil.com

Once the athletes are out of the water, they will then ride their bikes for 180.2 km. The biking course spans 1,105.64 feet and has a maximum elevation of 334.65 feet.

With such altitude, this stage could prove to be the toughest aspect of the event.

Many Ironman athletes seek to be the first off the bike. That should prove to be a key for athletes in Florianopolis—even if it only means the toughest of the three stages is behind them.

 

Stage 3

image from ironmanbrasil.com

The final stage is the 42 mile run; that is approximately 337.6 city blocks. I got tired just typing that.

At this point, even world-class athletes who have trained all year for this event begin to break down.

The stress the entire event puts on the body most often shows in this stage. Large leads have been lost because front-runners couldn't muster up enough strength to ward off more fit competitors.

 

Follow me for Sports Did You Knows, News and Spirited Opinions

Load More Stories

Follow B/R on Facebook

Out of Bounds

Olympics

Subscribe Now

We will never share your email address

Thanks for signing up.