Breaking Down Andrew Wiggins' Exclusive Interview with Bleacher Report

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Breaking Down Andrew Wiggins' Exclusive Interview with Bleacher Report

Andrew Wiggins is already one of the most discussed basketball players in the country. Bleacher Report's Jonathan Wasserman was fortunate enough to conduct an exclusive interview with the talented young prospect.

The Huntington Prep star is known by the industry as the best high school player in the country, according to 247Sports' composite rankings. He has great athleticism and a unique ability to score from almost anywhere on the court.

However, you can only get to know someone so much by watching them play. In this interview, you can see another side to the talented player. 

Here are the biggest takeaways from Wiggins' discussion with Wasserman. 

Note: All photos courtesy of 247 Sports.

 

He Is Not Ready to Make a Decision

It is known by now that Wiggins is down to four schools: Kansas, Kentucky, North Carolina and Florida State. Each one has its pros and cons, but it was clear that Wiggins did not have a favorite in mind during the interview.

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When asked specifically about playing styles, he simply responded by saying that he could "play in all of their offenses."

Obviously, any coach would find a way to get the best out of a player with this level of potential. However, each of his finalists has a very different style of play. Between pace of game to offensive sets, it is easy to differentiate the programs.

However, Wiggins chose to use a blanket statement for all of them, rather than choose one as a favorite based on a single factor. 

In addition, he did not mention Kansas—the only team still alive in the postseason among his favorites—when he discussed the current NCAA tournament.

It is safe to say that none of the fanbases feel more comfortable about getting the star's commitment after this interview.

 

Wiggins Will Enjoy His College Years

Many high school stars have one goal growing up: reach the NBA. While some players see college as a stepping stone to help them improve before they reach the professional level, others simply look at it as a one-year obstacle before getting paid.

This often ends up making a huge difference between players that become successful college stars and those that struggle.

However, seeing Wiggins discuss the NCAA tournament with a great deal of enjoyment is a good sign. He spoke to his brother (Nick Wiggins of Wichita State) about being in the Sweet 16 and he talked about the incredible run by Florida Gulf Coast.

It is clear that he wants to be a part of this atmosphere, which could affect where he decides to go to school. It also implies that he would do the things necessary to reach that stage, even it if means helping the team more than himself.

 

Although it is hard to imagine Wiggins staying anywhere longer than the required one year before entering the NBA draft, that single season should be special.

 

Modesty is Key

It is easy to get a big head as the Gatorade National Player of the Year. However, Wiggins seems to have done a good job of taking everything as a blessing.

When asked what makes him such a highly sought-after prospect, he did very little boasting. Instead, he talked about the fact that he has good genes.

This, of course, is based on the fact that his father spent six seasons in the NBA, while his mother won two silver medals for track and field in the Olympics. He has a lot to do before he can call himself the best athlete in the family.

Players that come into the college game believing they are already the best rarely do well. Conversely, his modesty will allow him to succeed as he learns from coaches and veterans over the next few years. 

His last line of the interview summed it all up as he said he wants to be known as "a good basketball player but a better person." This is the sign of someone who will be successful in every stage of life. 

 

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