Is Alabama's ArDarius Stewart or Oregon's Tyree Robinson Better ATH Recruit?

Edwin WeathersbyAnalyst IJanuary 31, 2013

Is Alabama's ArDarius Stewart or Oregon's Tyree Robinson Better ATH Recruit?

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    In this 2013 recruiting class, there are two prospects who present interesting upside in the "ATH" category, specifically ArDarius Stewart from Alabama and Tyree Robinson from California. These two guys are great football players, and they can do many different things for a team.

    When I watch them play on tape, I come away impressed with their natural physical tools. Each guy can play various positions, so their versatility moves them to the ATH list on most boards. As we approach national signing day on February 6th, let's continue our breakdown matchup series and conclude who's the better prospect.

    Today, we'll look at Stewart vs. Robinson.

Size

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    Stewart:

    The Alabama commit is a 6'1", 185-pound athlete who looks to be on the verge of exploding physically. Something about Stewart's frame tells me he may get up 210 pounds one day. He has great length to his frame, and this is a guy who is just destined to thicken up like good gravy.

     

    Robinson:

    The San Diego-area prospect stands 6'3" and weighs about 190 pounds. Robinson is very long, and his arms can hang like branches. He's going to fill out, too, and I expect him to get up 215-220 pounds in college. His height and length are both very impressive.

     

    Advantage: Robinson

Speed

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    Stewart:

    Stewart doesn't strike me as an elite speed guy, but he has some sharp explosiveness. I wouldn't totally put him in the build-up speed category, but he appears to be more toward that end of the spectrum. When he has the football, I see good quickness, athleticism and elusiveness. Stewart can get his engine started and reach a point to where he can out-race defenders.

     

    Robinson:

    Robinson, likely because he's taller, has smoother movements to his athleticism. He doesn't appear to be moving as fast as a defender thinks until he runs by them. His overall speed is solid and he'll flash some suddenness here and there. He can run on the BCS-caliber level, speed-wise.

     

    Advantage: Stewart

Strength

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    Stewart:

    One of the things that is impressive about Stewart is that he can play with some pop. He's pretty strong on the field for a skill ATH and if he's to become a WR, I can see him one day being able to beat press coverage with strength and "big boy" releases. I think Stewart also has a little "bully" in him in the open field.

     

    Robinson:

    The Oregon commit is not a tall but weak guy on the field. He has some jolt to his strength at certain times on the field. His strength is more explosive than Stewart's, but it doesn't appear to have the sustainability that Stewart's has. Yet, Robinson has good strength.

     

    Advantage: Stewart

Offensive Versatility

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    Stewart:

    I've seen Stewart line up as a QB a ton. He shows some tools needed to be a dual-threat QB in college, but his strong and deceptive running style is of a natural RB. He also seems to be pretty elusive and instinctive in the open field, which would help him at WR. His offensive versatility is off the charts. 

     

    Robinson:

    Robinson looks to be on track to play WR at Oregon should he remain on offense. His imposing size, length, smooth athleticism and solid ball skills scream WR.  

     

    Advantage: Stewart

Defensive Versatility

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    Stewart:

    Someone of Stewart's size at 6'1", 185-pounds naturally would be thought of as a DB, however not me when I look at Stewart as a defensive prospect. I like him as a hybrid Rover/OLB. He has good speed and strength, but I'm not a fan of him in space. At that position, his limitations can be masked and strengths accentuated. 

     

    Robinson:

    Robinson has the speed, hands and athletic ability to be a great FS. Maybe he can be developed as an OLB, but I would think of him as a free safety. Even though they lost out on Max Redfield, if they want to really develop him, Robinson could become a similar safety to Redfield.

     

    Advantage: Robinson

Conclusion

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    I really like Robinson's size and defensive versatility. He's also got pretty good speed, and his strength is solid too. To me, it appears he'll likely spend his initial college career at Oregon working his game as a WR.

    Stewart will probably start out as a WR, too, except he'll be at Alabama. However, I think when you factor in his solid size, good strength, speed and offensive versatility, he is the better ATH prospect.

    Both guys have things they need to work on when they become full-time positional players, but for me, I like Stewart just a tad more right now. 

     

    Edwin Weathersby is a College Football Recruiting Analyst for Bleacher Report. He has worked in scouting/player personnel departments for three professional football teams, including the New York Giants, Cleveland Browns and the Las Vegas Gladiators of the Arena League. He spent a year evaluating prep prospects and writing specific recruiting and scouting content articles for Student Sports Football (formerly ESPN Rise-HS). A syndicated scout and writer, he's also contributed to WeAreSC.com, GatorBait.net and Diamonds in the Rough Inc., a College Football and NFL Draft magazine.