50 People Who Should Be Enshrined in the Hockey Hall of Fame

Brad Kurtzberg@@sealshockeyContributor INovember 12, 2012

50 People Who Should Be Enshrined in the Hockey Hall of Fame

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    Induction into the Hockey Hall of Fame is the highest individual honor a hockey player, coach or GM can achieve over the course of his career. It is an honor that is reserved for the best of the best, players that are among the best of all time and who set the standard for excellence during their era and for their team.

    You will notice most of the players on this list are retired. There are a few active players listed here, but my standard for active players is this: if their career ended today, would they belong in the Hockey Hall of Fame?  So players like Evgeni Malkin, Sidney Crosby and Alex Ovechkin didn't make this list, although they may qualify in a few years if they keep producing at an elite level.

    Feel free to comment on players you don't feel belong and anybody you feel I left out, but again, remember the standard: If their career ended today, have they already qualified as being among the best of all time?

Don Cherry

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    OK, let's be clear here. Don Cherry belongs in the Hockey Hall of Fame....as a broadcaster.

    Since the early 1980s, Cherry has been a ratings force on Hockey Night in Canada. For many years, his "Coach's Corner" segment actually got higher ratings than the game itself.

    Cherry is opinionated, bombastic and nearly as loud as some of his suits, but you can't ignore him, and he's always entertaining even if he isn't always right.

    As a coach, Cherry was very good, but his lack of a Stanley Cup title and his lack of longevity as a head coach would keep him out of the Hall of Fame. But as a broadcaster, he's as influential and popular as anybody in the sport over the last two decades.

Claude Lemieux

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    A quick look at Claude Lemieux's career statistics and you wonder why he's a part of this conversation. Lemieux's numbers are good, but not outstanding. The super pest scored 379 goals and 786 points in 1,215 career NHL games.

    But look at Lemieux's intangibles and you understand why many people feel he belongs. Lemieux won four Stanley Cups during his career and is one of only 10 players in NHL history to win a title with three different teams.

    He was at his best in the clutch. In 234 playoff games, he scored 80 goals (No. 9 all-time) and 158 points. In 1994-95, he was named the winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy as the MVP of the Stanley Cup Playoffs.

    Lemieux was often called on to keep opposing players off their game. He was a great agitator and a player who played his best when game counted most.

    He was the type of player that you loved to have on your team, but hated to play against.

Pat Burns

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    Pat Burns was a huge sentimental favorite while he was battling cancer and fighting for his life. Sentiment aside, the popular former coach belongs in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

    Burns was a three-time winner of the Jack Adams Award as Coach of the Year, winning it with three different teams: Montreal, Toronto and Boston.

    He reached the Stanley Cup final twice as a coach, coming up short in 1989 with Montreal before winning it all with the New Jersey Devils in 2003.

    Burns had only two sub-.500 seasons in his NHL career and finished with a career record of 501-353-165.

    He died of cancer in 2010 at the age of 58.

Mark Recchi

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    Mark Recchi isn't eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame just yet, as he retired after the 2010-11 season.

    Still, once he's eligible, there's little doubt Recchi will eventually be inducted. He scored 577 goals during his NHL career and accumulated 1,533 points in 1,652 games.

    He also won three Stanley Cups, one with the Penguins in 1991, then with the Hurricanes in 2006 and finally with the Bruins in his final NHL season.

    Recchi played in seven NHL All-Star Games and was named the MVP of the 1996-97 contest.

    In 1992-93, Recchi scored 123 points, the most scored in a single season by a member of the Philadelphia Flyers.

    In 2011, Recchi became the oldest player to score a goal in the Stanley Cup Final at the age of 43 years and 126 days.

Teppo Numminen

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    Defenseman Teppo Numminen was one of the steadiest players in recent NHL history.

    He served as captain of the Coyotes for part of his tenure with the franchise and played in two NHL All-Star Games.

    While he style wasn't flashy, Numminen was a productive defenseman who played in 1,372 NHL games and scored 117 goals and 637 points.

    In addition to Winnipeg/Phoenix, Numminen played for the Dallas Stars and Buffalo Sabres.

Peter Bondra

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    Former Capitals forward Peter Bondra finished his NHL career with 503 goals. Reaching 500 used to make a player a lock for induction, but Bondra has yet to get the call from the Hall since he became eligible in 2010.

    The Slovak great remains the Capitals' all-time leader in goals scored, points, power-play goals, shorthanded goals and game-winning goals.

    Twice, Bondra either led the league or was tied for the NHL lead in goals scored including the lockout-shortened 1994-95 season when he scored 34 goals in 47 games.

    Bondra played in five All-Star Games and helped lead the Capitals to their first trip to the Stanley Cup Final in 1997-98. The fact that he never won a Stanley Cup may be delaying his induction.

Alexander Mogilny

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    Alexander Mogilny was an offensive force during his NHL career, scoring 473 goals and 1,032 points in 990 games with the Sabres, Canucks, Devils and Maple Leafs.

    In 1992-93, Mogilny led the NHL by scoring 76 goals in 77 games. He finished the year with a career-high 127 points.

    The fast-skating Russian was selected to play in six NHL All-Star Games and won the Lady Byng Trophy in 2002-03.

    In 2000, he helped the New Jersey Devils win the Stanley Cup.

    Perhaps his reputation as being an offensive player but not a great all-around player early in his career has delayed his induction. Still, Mogilny was one of the great offensive talents of the 1990s and should eventually get a call from the hall.

Sergei Fedorov

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    Few players in NHL history have possessed the all-around skills of Russian winger Sergei Fedorov.

    Fedorov finished his NHL career with 483 goals and 1,179 points in 1,248 games. He became the first Russian-born NHL player to win the Hart Trophy as the league's MVP.

    The native of Pskov, Russia, had 10 seasons of 30 goals or more and twice was named winner of the Frank J. Selke Award as the NHL's best defensive forward.

    Fedorov was part of the Red Wings' "Russian Five," a group of five players who played as a unit and helped make the Wings one of the league's dominant teams in the 1990s.

    He won three Stanley Cups with Detroit before finishing his career with the Ducks, Blue Jackets and Capitals.

    At 42, Fedorov was still active in the KHL last year. He should be inducted to the Hockey Hall of Fame soon after he becomes eligible.

Phil Housley

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    Phil Housley's name is often overlooked when candidates for the Hockey Hall of Fame are listed.

    The American-born Housley was one of the best offensive defensemen of his era, scoring 338 goals and 1,232 points in 1,495 career NHL games with the Sabres, Jets, Blues, Flames, Devils, Capitals, Blackhawks and Maple Leafs.

    Housley played in seven NHL All-Star Games and topped the 20-goal mark seven different times during his career.

    Unfortunately for the St. Paul, Minnesota native, he never played for a Stanley Cup winner, coming closest with the Capitals, who reached the Stanley Cup Final in 1998 before falling in four straight games to the Red Wings.

    Housley is already a member of the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame, but it still waiting for a call from the HHOF in Toronto.

Dave Taylor

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    Los Angeles Kings' great Dave Taylor spent 17 seasons in the NHL after starring at Clarkson University.

    He is best known as a member of the Kings' "Triple Crown Line" along with Charlie Simmer and Marcel Dionne.

    Taylor finished his playing career with 431 goals and 1,069 points in 1,111 games. Five times, Taylor topped 90 points in a season and twice he scored more than 100 points.

    He was part of the 1993 Kings team that reached the Stanley Cup Final for the first time in franchise history and served as captain of the Kings for four seasons. He also won the King Clancy Trophy and the Masterton Trophy.

    After his playing career ended, Taylor spent a decade as GM of the Kings and currently works for the Blues organization.

Paul Kariya

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    Paul Kariya would have been a shoo-in for the Hockey Hall of Fame had his career not been cut short by injury. As a result, he fell just short of 1,000 career games and 1,000 career points.

    The native of Vancouver finished with 989 points in 989 career NHL games and was one of the best passing centers of his era. Teaming with Teemu Selanne while with the Ducks, Kariya was half of one of the league's most dangerous offensive duos.

    Twice, Kariya topped 100 points in a season, and on one other occasion, he finished a season with 99 points. He played in seven NHL All-Star Games and was named to five postseason All-Star Teams. Twice, Kariya was named the winner of the Lady Byng Trophy as the league's most gentlemanly player.

    Kariya served as captain of the Ducks for eight seasons and was an integral part of the Mighty Ducks team that reached the Stanley Cup Final for the first time in franchise history in 2003.

    Despite falling just short of the 1,000-point plateau, Kariya still deserves entry into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Neal Broten

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    Neal Broten is one of the few players in hockey history who won the NCAA title, an Olympic gold medal and the Stanley Cup.

    Broten won the Hobey Baker Award as the top player in NCAA hockey with the University of Minnesota before joining the 1980 "Miracle On Ice" squad that shocked the world and won the gold medal.

    The Roseau, Minnesota native joined his hometown North Stars after the Olympics and became the first American to score 100 points in an NHL season.

    Twice, Broten was named to the NHL All-Star Game and he went on to score the game-winning goal in the Cup-clinching game for the New Jersey Devils in 1995.

    Broten finished his career with 923 points in 1,099 games. The Stars' organization retired Broten's No. 7 in 1998.

Chris Osgood

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    Chris Osgood was always considered a good, but not great, goalie during most of his NHL career, but when you look back at his career numbers, he definitely deserves consideration for the Hockey Hall of Fame.

    Osgood finished with 401 career wins (which places him in the all-time top 10) and a record of 401-216-66-29. His career GAA was 2.49 and his career save percentage .905.

    Most memorably, Osgood won three Stanley Cups as a player and was the starter for two of them. He also was the goalie for the 2009 Red Wings team that reached Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final before falling by one goal to the Pittsburgh Penguins.

    Osgood was named to three NHL All-Star Games and twice won the Jennings Trophy by playing for the NHL team that gave up the fewest goals.

Mike Vernon

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    Mike Vernon spent 19 seasons in the NHL with the Flames, Red Wings, Sharks and Panthers.

    He won a pair of Stanley Cups, one with Calgary and one with Detroit, and won the Jennings Trophy in 1995-96. In 1996-97, the Calgary native won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP while leading the Red Wings to a title.

    He finished his career with 385-273-92 record and a GAA of 2.98. He also played in five NHL All-Star Games and was named to one postseason All-Star Team.

    The Flames retired Vernon's No. 30 in 2007. He is still awaiting a call from the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Kevin Lowe

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    Kevin Lowe's offensive numbers are not outstanding, but he deserves consideration for the Hockey Hall of Fame for his outstanding defensive play. Lowe was a defensive defenseman and steady force on the Oilers dynasty teams of the 1980s, best known for their offensive explosiveness.

    Lowe scored the first-ever goal for the Oilers in their NHL history. He played in 1,254 career games and won six Stanley Cups, five with Edmonton and one with the New York Rangers. Lowe scored 84 goals and 432 points over the course of his career.

    The native of Lachute, Quebec appeared in seven NHL All-Star Games and won the King Clancy Award in 1989-90. He served as captain of the Oilers during the 1991-92 season and later served as coach and GM of the Oilers after his playing career was over.

Rod Brind'Amour

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    Ottawa native Rod Brind'Amour spent 20 seasons in the National Hockey League, scoring 452 goals and 1,184 points in 1,484 career games with the St. Louis Blues, Philadelphia Flyers and Carolina Hurricanes.

    In addition to his offensive ability, Brind'Amour was one of the better defensive centers in the game during his career. He won back-to-back Selke Trophies as the NHL's best defensive forward in 2006 and 2007.

    Brind'Amour served as captain of the Hurricanes and was instrumental in the team's 2006 Stanley Cup championship.

    The Hurricanes retired Brind'Amour's jersey in 2011, and he currently works as an assistant coach for the Carolina organization.

Steve Larmer

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    Steve Larmer is a member of the 1,000-game club and the 1,000-point club, and appeared in 884 straight games for the Chicago Blackhawks before a contract dispute put an end to the third-longest consecutive-games streak in NHL history.

    Larmer scored 40 or more goals in five seasons for Chicago and won the Calder Trophy as the NHL's top rookie in 1982-83.

    The native of Peterborough, Ontario, played in two NHL All-Star Games and won the Stanley Cup with the New York Rangers in 1994.

    In 1,006 career NHL games, Larmer scored 441 goals and 1,012 points.

Pierre Turgeon

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    The Buffalo Sabres made Pierre Turgeon the first overall pick in the 1987 NHL draft, and the native of Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec didn't disappoint. He played in 1,294 games for the Sabres, Islanders, Canadiens, Blues, Stars and Avalanche and scored 515 goals and 1,327 points.

    Turgeon had nine seasons of 30 or more goals including a career-high 58 goals and 132 points with the Islanders in 1992-93.

    Turgeon played in four NHL All-Star Games and won the Lady Byng Trophy for gentlemanly play in 1992-93. He also served as captain of the Canadiens in 1995-96.

Marian Hossa

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    Slovakian winger Marian Hossa remains an active player but is already on the cusp of having Hall of Fame-worthy career numbers.

    Hossa has scored 417 goals and 904 points in 978 career NHL games. At his present scoring pace, he will eclipse the 1,000-point mark in less than two full healthy seasons.

    Hossa has played in five NHL All-Star Games and ended a strange streak when he finally won the Stanley Cup with the Blackhawks in 2010. It was the third consecutive year the high-scoring winger had played in the Stanley Cup Final, playing for three different teams. He lost the first two times he reached the championship series.

    The well-traveled Hossa has already played for Ottawa, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, Detroit and Chicago.

    The lockout should give him additional time to recover from the devastating hit by Raffi Torres and the resulting concussion that ended his playoffs prematurely last year.

Joe Thornton

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    While he has his share of critics, "Jumbo" Joe Thornton has already accumulated statistics that make him worthy of the Hockey Hall of Fame. Since Thornton is only 33, he has the chance to add to those already impressive numbers.

    In 1,077 career NHL games, Thornton has scored 324 goals and 1,078 points. He has been selected to play in six NHL All-Star Games and was named captain of one of the squads in 2009. Thornton won the Hart Trophy as league MVP and the Art Ross Trophy for leading the league in points in 2005-06, the season he was traded from Boston to San Jose.

    Thornton has topped the 100-point mark three times and has also been named to three postseason All-Star Teams.

    In 2005-06 and 2006-07, he became only the third player in NHL history to have back-to-back 90-assist seasons. The other two to accomplish this feat were Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux.

Scott Niedermayer

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    Scott Niedermayer will be eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2013 and shouldn't have to wait too long for the call from the hall.

    The former Devils and Ducks defenseman won four Stanley Cups over the course of his NHL career and won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP in 2006-07 with the Anaheim Ducks. He also won the Norris Trophy in 2003-04 as the NHL's top defenseman.

    Niedermayer was selected to appear in six NHL All-Star Games and was named to four postseason All-Star Teams. He was one of the most gifted skaters of his era and scored 172 goals and 740 points in 1,263 NHL games despite playing most of his prime years in a defense-oriented system that restricted his puck-carrying instincts in open ice.

    The Devils retired Niedermayer's No. 27 last December.

Pavel Datsyuk

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    Pavel Datsyuk is one of the best all-around forwards in the game today and has already won enough hardware over the course of his NHL career to garner serious Hall of Fame consideration.

    In addition to winning a pair of Stanley Cups with Detroit, the native of Sverdlovsk, Russia has won four Lady Byng Trophies for gentlemanly play and three Selke Awards as the NHL's best defensive forward.

    Datsyuk has also been selected to play in four NHL All-Star Games, been named to one postseason All-Star Team and had the NHL's best plus/minus rating in 2007-08.

    Overall, Datsyuk already has 240 goals and 718 points in 732 career games. Assuming the lockout ends soon, he will have a chance to add to these numbers for several more years.

Rick Middleton

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    Rick "Nifty" Middleton was a high-scoring winger for the Rangers and Bruins in the 1970s and 80s.

    The smooth native of Toronto scored 40 or more goals in five straight seasons including a career-high 51 in 1981-82. He also scored 90 or more points for five consecutive years, including a pair of 100-plus point seasons.

    Middleton also set a unique playoff record in 1982-83 that he yet to be broken, scoring 11 goals and 33 points in just 17 games, the most ever for a player who did not reach the Stanley Cup Final.

    Middleton played in three NHL All-Star Games and won the Lady Byng Trophy for gentlemanly play in 1981-82.

    He finished his NHL career with 448 goals and 988 points in 1,005 games.

Doug Weight

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    Doug Weight finished his NHL career with 1,033 points, No. 5 among American-born players and a mark that guarantees serious consideration for the Hockey Hall of Fame.

    The Detroit native played for the Rangers, Oilers, Blues, Hurricanes, Ducks and Islanders during his NHL career, serving as captain of both the Oilers and Islanders over the course of his career.

    He played in four NHL All-Star Games and won a Stanley Cup with the Hurricanes in 2006. He scored a career-best 104 points with Edmonton in 1995-96.

    Today, Weight is an assistant coach with the New York Islanders.

Rob Blake

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    Defenseman Rob Blake accomplished a lot during his NHL career with the Kings, Avalanche and Sharks.

    The Simcoe, Ontario native scored 240 goals and 777 points in 1,270 career NHL games. He played in six NHL All-Star Games and was named to postseason All-Star teams on four occasions.

    Blake served as captain of both the Kings and Sharks and won the Norris Trophy as the league's top defenseman in 1997-98.

    In 2001, Blake helped lead the Avalanche to their second Stanley Cup championship.

    He will be eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame for the first time in 2013.

Fred Shero

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    Fred Shero was one of the most innovative and successful head coaches in the NHL during the 1970s. He had a far-reaching influence on the game of hockey, and his exclusion from the Hockey Hall of Fame remains a bit of a mystery.

    Shero won back-to-back Stanley Cups with the Flyers in 1974 and 1975, making Philadelphia the first NHL expansion team to win a title. His teams played a very rough—most would say even dirty—style, and their constant brawling tactics earned them the nickname "The Broad Street Bullies."

    "Freddy the Fog" was also one of the first NHL coaches to study Russian and European training methods, and adapted some of them to the NHL game. He also was the first NHL head coach to hire a full-time assistant.

    Shero led the Flyers back to the Stanley Cup Final in 1976, but they fell to the Montreal Canadiens. He led Philadelphia to back-to-back appearances in the semifinals in 1977 and 1978 before leading the New York Rangers to a surprise run to the Stanley Cup Final in 1979.

    Shero finished his NHL coaching career with a 390-225-119 record. His son Ray is now GM of the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Ron MacLean

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    CBC host Ron MacLean deserves to be in the Hockey Hall of Fame for his work as a broadcaster.

    MacLean has served as the host of CBC's Hockey Night in Canada since 1986-87, a span of 25 years, and has been the face of that broadcast ever since. He clearly exudes a love for the game of hockey that shows in his work.

    He has won eight Gemini Awards for his work on HNIC, including being named Canada's Best Sports Broadcaster five times.

    MacLean has the difficult job of co-hosting the "Coach's Corner" segment each Saturday with Don Cherry, and nobody could do a better job of  keeping Cherry on point and on time than MacLean.

    He has also hosted several NHL awards shows and remains a well-known, loved and respected voice of the sport.

Rick Tocchet

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    Rick Tocchet's career numbers earn him consideration for the Hockey Hall of Fame, but some off-ice controversy that took place after his playing career may keep him out of hockey's hallowed hall.

    The Scarborough, Ontario native was a true power forward who scored 440 goals and 952 points in 1,144 games. Tocchet also accumulated 2,972 penalty minutes in his career with the Flyers, Penguins, Kings, Bruins, Capitals and Coyotes. He won a Stanley Cup with Pittsburgh in 1991-92, scoring 19 points in 14 playoff games.

    He pled guilty to being involved in an effort to promote gambling in hockey in New Jersey and was sentenced to two years probation. He was later reinstated by the NHL and served as head coach of the Tampa Bay Lightning for two seasons.

Rogie Vachon

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    Rogie Vachon has been overlooked by the Hall of Fame so far despite the fact that he was one of the best goalies in the NHL in the 1960s and 70s.

    Vachon broke in with the Montreal Canadiens and played on two Stanley Cup championship teams. Vachon did backstop the Habs to the 1967 Stanley Cup Final but fell to the Maple Leafs in that series in six games.

    In 1971, Vachon was traded to the Kings, where he became the team's first true star. He was voted the Kings' MVP four times in the mid-70s and played in three NHL All-Star Games while being named to a pair of postseason NHL All-Star Teams.

    In 1976, Vachon was the best player for Team Canada in the first-ever Canada Cup. He finished the tournament with a 6-1 record and an impressive 1.39 GAA. He was named the MVP of Team Canada and was also named to the tournament All-Star Team.

    Vachon finished his career with the Bruins and Red Wings before joining the Kings organization as a coach, GM and executive.

    He finished his career with 355 wins and a 2.99 GAA.

Gary Roberts

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    Gary Roberts overcame injuries that nearly ended his NHL career at 30 and went on to have a productive second act as a hockey player. He played for the Flames, Hurricanes, Maple Leafs, Panthers, Penguins and Lightning.

    The North York, Ontario native won a Stanley Cup with the 1989 Calgary Flames and scored a career-best 53 goals for the Flames three seasons later.

    Roberts played in three NHL All-Star Games and won the Masterton Trophy for dedication to hockey in 1996.

    He finished his NHL career with 438 goals and 909 points in 1,224 games.

Andre Lacroix

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    Andre Lacroix is the all-time leading scorer in WHA history. Because his accomplishments came in the "other" league, he has been overlooked for induction into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

    Lacroix was one of the early stars for the Philadelphia Flyers, but he really became a star in 1972-73 when he signed with the Philadelphia Blazers of the WHA. Lacroix scored more than 100 points for six straight WHA seasons. His best season came in 1974-75, when he had 106 assists and 147 points playing for the San Diego Mariners.

    Twice Lacroix led the WHA in scoring, and he was named to the league's postseason All Star Team three times. When the WHA put together an All-Star Team to take on the Russians in 1974, Lacroix was named to the club and finished No. 2 on Team Canada in scoring.

    He finished his career with 198 points in 325 NHL games and 798 points in 551 WHA contests.

Tom Barrasso

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    Tom Barrasso had a fine NHL career, but his often stormy relationship with the media and fans have so far kept him out of the Hockey Hall of Fame.

    Barrasso was the starting goalie for the Pittsburgh Penguins when they won back-to-back Stanley Cups in 1991 and 1992.

    The Boston native broke in with the Buffalo Sabres and won the Calder Trophy as the league's top rookie in 1984-85. He was later named to three postseason All Star Teams.

    Barrasso finished his career with 369 wins and 39 shutouts. He was the first American goalie to surpass 300 career wins.

Flash Hollett

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    Flash Hollett is an overlooked star of the early NHL who belongs in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

    Hollett played for the Bruins, Senators, Leafs and Red Wings in the 1930s and early 40s. He was the finest offensive defenseman of his day and became the first blueliner to score 20 goals in a season back in 1944-45 during a 50 game season.

    Hollett won two Stanley Cups with the Bruins in 1939 and 1941.

    At the time of his retirement, Hollett was the all-time scoring leader among defensemen. He finished his career with 132 goals and 313 points in 565 NHL games.

Eric Lindros

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    We'll never truly know how good Eric Lindros could have been.

    When he entered the league with the Flyers in 1992, he instantly became a dominant player, and for a brief time he may have been the best player in the game.

    But Lindros' career was quickly derailed by a series of injuries, and he was never the same. Concussions forced him to sit out the 2000-01 season, and he was just a shadow of himself after that, toiling in virtual obscurity for the Rangers, Stars and Leafs before hanging up his skates for good after the 2006-07 season.

    Another reason Lindros may not be in the Hall of Fame yet is because he made more than a few enemies in Quebec when he refused to play for the Nordiques after they drafted him.

    His career numbers are good: 372 goals and 865 points in 760 career games. He was the league MVP in the lockout-shortened 1994-95 season and was a first-team postseason All-Star once and a second-team All-Star once.

    If Lindros had stayed healthy, there is little doubt he was bound for the Hockey Hall of Fame. But after his injuries, the London, Ontario native sees himself on the outside looking in—at least for now.

Martin St. Louis

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    Martin St. Louis only stands 5'8", but his lack of size hasn't stopped him from becoming one of the best players of the modern era.

    St. Louis has scored 323 goals and 852 points in 931 career games with the Flames and Lightning.

    St. Louis helped lead the Lightning to a Stanley Cup title in 2004. That same year, he won the Art Ross Trophy as the NHL's top scorer, the Hart Trophy as league MVP and had the league's top plus/minus rating.

    He later won back-to-back Lady Byng Trophies for gentlemanly play in 2010 and 2011.

    St. Louis played in six NHL All-Star Games and was named to five postseason All-Star Teams.

    He has shown few signs of slowing down at the age of 37 and would most likely have already topped the 1,000-point mark and 1,000-games-played plateau if his career had not been interrupted three times by labor stoppages.

Jeremy Roenick

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    Jeremy Roenick was always a popular player, but his numbers put him on the edge of qualifying for the Hockey Hall of Fame as a player.

    He is the third-ever American-born NHL player to reach the 500-goal mark and finished with 513 goals and 1,206 points in 1,363 games.

    While he reached 500 career goals, Roenick never did win a Stanley Cup and never won a major NHL award. While he played in nine NHL All-Star Games, he never was named to a postseason All-Star Team.

    Roenick is already a member of the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame, but he has to wait awhile to see if he will be selected for the HHOF in Toronto.

Jarome Iginla

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    Jarome Iginla was a highly touted prospect when the Dallas Stars drafted him No. 11 overall in 1995, and he more than lived up to the hype.

    Iginla has served as the Flames' captain since 2004 and is the franchise's all-time leader in goals, points and games played.

    The Edmonton native has been named to four postseason All-Star teams and played in six All-Star Games.

    Iginla has won a pair of Rocket Richard Trophies as the league's top goal scorer and the Art Ross Trophy as the league's leading scorer.

    In 1,188 career games, Iginla has scored 516 goals and 1,073 points.

Daniel Alfredsson

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    Senators captain Daniel Alfredsson holds every meaningful career-scoring mark in the modern history of the franchise.

    The 39-year-old Swede has spent his entire NHL career in Ottawa and has scored 416 goals and 1,082 points in 1,131 games. He is also an outstanding defensive player and has been a finalist for the Selke Trophy as the league's best defensive forward.

    He has been selected to six All-Star Games and won the Calder Trophy as the NHL's rookie of the Year and the King Clancy Award.

    In 2007, he became the first European-born player to captain a team to the Stanley Cup Final.

    Assuming the lockout does not cancel the season, Alfredsson should be back in Ottawa once hockey resumes to add to his totals.

Keith Tkachuk

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    Keith Tkachuk has reached a lot of milestones that usually ensure a player's induction to the Hockey Hall of Fame. He has played more than 1,000 games (1,201), scored more than 500 goals (538) and accumulated more than 1,000 points (1,065).

    The man they nicknamed "Big Walt" played 19 seasons in the NHL with the Jets, Coyotes, Blues and Thrashers.

    The Melrose, Massachusetts native played in five NHL All-Star Games and was named to a pair of postseason All-Star teams.

    He was one of the great generation of American-born NHLers that were inspired by the 1980 Miracle on Ice.

    Tkachuk will be eligible for the HHOF for the first time in 2013.

Curtis Joseph

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    Curtis Joseph didn't get voted into the Hockey Hall of Fame last year in his first year of eligibility, but the Keswick, Ontario native should find his way in someday soon.

    "Cujo" stands No. 4 all time in career wins with 454 and is No. 5 all time in games played. His career GAA is a solid 2.79.

    Joseph was a fan favorite and a winner wherever he went. Although he never won a Stanley Cup, "Cujo" specialized in helping underdog teams make longer-than-expected playoff runs.

    Critics may view "Cujo" as an accumulator, and while he was never the best goalie of his time, he was in the top five for many years and his consistency should eventually land him in the HHOF with the game's best.

Dave Andreychuk

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    Dave Andreychuk has been overlooked by the Hall of Fame voters since he became eligible in 2009, but should be entering hockey's hallowed hall soon.

    Andreychuk scored 640 goals (No. 14 all time) and 1,338 points (tied for No. 27th all time) in his 1,639 game NHL career. He is also the league's all-time leader in power-play goals with 274.

    The Hamilton, Ontario, native played in a pair of NHL All-Star Games and finally won the Stanley Cup in 2004 with the Tampa Bay Lightning.

Mike Modano

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    No American-born hockey player has scored as many points as former (North) Stars center Mike Modano.

    The Livonia, Michigan native scored 561 career goals and 1,374 points over 21 NHL seasons, all but one of them spent with the Stars franchise.

    He served as captain of the Stars for three seasons and was one of the club's leaders when they won their only Stanley Cup title in 1999.

    Modano was selected to eight NHL All-Star Games and was named to one postseason All-Star Team.

    He is presently the greatest player in the history of the Stars franchise and will be eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame starting in 2014.

Chris Pronger

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    Chris Pronger has been one of the most dominant defensemen of his era.

    The former top pick of the Hartford Whalers has won a Stanley Cup and a Norris Trophy, and was the first defenseman since Bobby Orr to win the Hart Trophy as league MVP.

    Pronger was selected to play in six NHL All-Star Games and was named to four postseason All-Star teams.

    He also helped lead three teams to the Stanley Cup Final. He was a leader and a real physical presence on the ice. By playing so many minutes and such a physical style, he made all the players around him better.

    Pronger has 157 goals  and 698 points in 1,167 career games. His career may be over as a result of repeated concussions. He should be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame shortly after he becomes eligible.

Chris Chelios

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    Chris Chelios lasted an incredible 26 seasons in the National Hockey League and presently stands No. 5 all-time with 1,651 games played.

    Chelios didn't just last a long time—he was one of the best in the game for a long time, too. He was selected to play in 11 NHL All-Star Games and was named to seven postseason All-Star teams.

    The Chicago native won the Stanley Cup three times, twice with Detroit and once with Montreal, and also won three Norris Trophies as the NHL's best defenseman.

    He finished with 185 goals and 948 points for his NHL career with Montreal, Chicago, Detroit and Atlanta.

    Chelios will be eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2013.

Teemu Selanne

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    "The Finnish Flash" burst onto the NHL scene back in 1992-93 with a record-setting 76 goal and a 132-point campaign, and he hasn't stopped putting up points since then.

    The 42-year-old Finn remains a productive player and even led the Ducks in scoring last season with 66 points.

    Selanne won the Calder Trophy as the NHL's best rookie and led or tied for the league lead in goals scored on three separate occasions.  He has been selected to 11 NHL All-Star Games and four postseason All-Star teams.

    Selanne holds nearly every major scoring record in Ducks franchise history and helped lead the club to a Stanley Cup title in 2007.

    So far, Selanne has scored 663 goals and 1,406 points in 1,341 career NHL games.

Dominik Hasek

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    Dominik Hasek earned his nickname "The Dominator" for his strong play on the ice.

    Hasek played in 16 NHL seasons and won 389 career games, good for No. 11 all time. His .922 career save percentage is the best of all time. He also ranks No. 6 all time with 81 shutouts, No. 8 with a 2.13 career GAA.

    Hasek won six Vezina Trophies as the league's top goalie, as well as two Hart Trophies and Lester B. Pearson Trophies as league MVP.

    Hasek won a pair of Stanley Cups and helped the Senators and Sabres reach the Stanley Cup Final.

    His distinct style of flopping and stopping the puck in any way possible made him stand out in a league made up of mostly butterfly-style goalies.

    The Czech goalie left the NHL after 2008 and spent the past few seasons in Europe.

    Hasek announced his official retirement this fall after no team signed him to a new deal. He should be a first-ballot Hall of Famer.

Jaromir Jagr

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    Few players in recent NHL history have been as dominant offensively as Jaromir Jagr.

    Jagr won a pair of Stanley Cups with Pittsburgh early in his career when teamed with Mario Lemieux. He has also led the NHL in points five times and won one Hart Trophy and three Lester B. Pearson Trophies as NHL MVP. Eight times, Jagr was named to a postseason All-Star team including seven first-team selections.

    Jagr has topped 90 points in a season 10 times and gone over 100 points five times.

    No European-born player has more points than Jagr. In 1,346 NHL games, the talented Czech has scored 665 goals and 1,653 points while playing for Pittsburgh, Washington, the Rangers and Flyers. Once the lockout is over, Jagr is expected to join the Dallas Stars.

    He should be an undisputed first-ballot Hall of Famer.

Brendan Shanahan

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    Brendan Shanahan is now best known as the man who hands out suspensions for the NHL, but during his NHL career, he was a top power forward who influenced the game both on and off the ice.

    Shanahan finished No. 11 all time in goals scored with 656 and No. 25 all time in points. He also had six seasons with 40 or more goals and a pair of 50-goal seasons. The Mimico, Ontario native won three Stanley Cups during his NHL career. He was also the consummate power forward and had 17 seasons with 100 or more penalty minutes during his career.

    After the lockout, Shanahan helped make changes to the game to help get the game out of the "dead puck era." His ideas helped eliminate obstruction and helped open up the game after the 2004-05 lockout.

Nicklas Lidstrom

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    Red Wings' defenseman Nicklas Lidstrom won't be eligible for the Hockey Hall of Fame until 2015, but rest assured he will be elected to the Hall in his first year of eligibility.

    Lidstrom is considered one of the best defensemen ever to play the game. He finished his NHL career with 264 goals and 1,142 points in 1,564 career NHL games.

    His list of accomplishments is tough to match. Lidstrom won four Stanley Cups and seven Norris Trophies as the NHL's top defenseman (second only to Bobby Orr), and was selected to play in 12 NHL All-Star Games.

    He also won the Conn Smythe Trophy as the league's playoff MVP in 2002 and spent six years as captain of the Red Wings.

    Lidstrom's style wasn't flashy, but he was so smart and anticipated plays so well that he was always in the right position to make plays. He made it look easy, but Lidstrom played the game better than nearly anybody else in the league during the course of his career.

    In his 20-year NHL career, Lidstrom's teams never failed to qualify for the Stanley Cup playoffs.

Martin Brodeur

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    Martin Brodeur is arguably the best goalie in NHL history. No netminder has won more games or registered more shutouts in the regular season and in the playoffs.

    Brodeur led the Devils to three Stanley Cup titles. He has won the Calder Trophy as the league's best rookie and four Vezina Trophies as the top goalie in the NHL.

    Brodeur has been named to seven postseason All-Star teams and played in 10 All-Star Games.

    Few goalies have been as good as Brodeur has for as long as Brodeur has. He is a lock for the Hall of Fame as soon as he is eligible, although at age 40, he played well enough to lead the Devils back to the Stanley Cup Final last spring.