Packers President Mark Murphy's in a Tough Spot and More NFC North News

Andrew GardaFeatured ColumnistSeptember 28, 2012

GREEN BAY, WI - AUGUST 16: Mark Murphy, President and CEO of the Green Bay Packers, walks the sidelines before a preseason game against Cleveland Browns at Lambeau Field on August 16, 2012 in Green Bay, Wisconsin. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Packers president Mark Murphy was silent about the Monday Night Football debacle because he wanted to respect the process of negotiations, according to Tom Silverstein of the Journal-Sentinel.

That's not good enough for many Packer fans, nor should it be. 

The Packers are a unique organization, one without a single owner to step forward and defend the team when things like Monday night happen.

As they don't have that guy, it's up to Murphy to raise an objection when the franchise is embroiled in turmoil. That's his job.

Or is it?

This is the odd position many presidents and general managers might find themselves in, working in a billion dollar industry with bosses who, ultimately, are more worried about the bottom line than anything else.

Even more awkward is the position of a guy like Murphy, who doesn't even have a Jerry Jones, Woody Johnson or Bob Kraft to absorb a hit or give him direction in a situation like this.

Murphy stayed quiet, though how, I'll never know. But in some ways I get why he tried—there is no owner to balance out whatever he says. No owner to play the calm 'let's let this play out' to Murphy's irate anger (well the anger you all wanted to see).

It was an awkward position to be in and, frankly, the team took care of the rage themselves.

So, for what it's worth, don't be too hard on Murphy. The position he was in was—and always will be for anyone who has his particular job—a tricky one.

He has no boss to point to, and a ton of bosses to worry about.

There's pretty much no way to have this come out OK for him.

On to the rest of the NFC North.

 

Chicago Bears

Over at ESPN Chicago.com, Michael Wright relays Jay Cutler's most recent pleasantries with the press.

The Tribune's Dan Pompei says that competition at various positions on the team has increased the overall level of play.

Sean Jensen of the Sun-Times says that the Bears' offense is having big issues on first down.

 

Detroit Lions

Mlive.com's Anwar Richardson says even though his role is smaller, Kevin Smith isn't upset.

Carloz Monarrez of The Free Press says the Lions' offensive line has a huge worry this weekend as Jared Allen is in town.

Good news from The Detroit News' Chris McCosky—Matt Stafford looks like he will start against the Vikings.

 

Green Bay Packers

CheeseheadTV.com's Zach Kruse tries to cool your enthusiasm for the hot start of the Packers' defense.

Bleacher Report's Brian Carriveau gives you 10 keys to the game for the Packers this weekend.

ESPN Wisconsin's Jason Wilde says after a horrific performance against the Seahawks, the offensive line is determined to bounce back.

 

Minnesota Vikings

Bleacher Report's Arif Hasan gives you six keys to the game for the Minnesota Vikings.

The Vikings have chosen an architect who has designed the Cowboys and Colts stadiums, according to 1500 ESPN's Tom Pelissero.

Ben Goessling of the Pioneer-Press says Adrian Peterson's workload is likely to increase.

 

Check out the B/R NFC North Facebook page—like us and keep up with everything NFC North on Bleacher Report.com.

Follow me on Twitter at @andrew_garda.