Twitter Reacts to Andy Roddick's Retirement from Tennis

Ian Hanford@Ian_HanfordFeatured ColumnistAugust 30, 2012

NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 30:  Andy Roddick of the United States speaks to the media during a press conference announcing his retirement during Day Four of the 2012 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on August 30, 2012 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.  (Photo by Michael Heiman/Getty Images)
Michael Heiman/Getty Images

American tennis player Andy Roddick shocked the tennis world on Thursday by announcing that the 2012 U.S. Open will be the final tournament of his tennis career.

The U.S. Open's Twitter feed reported on Roddick's announcement:

BREAKING NEWS: @andyroddick announcing retirement after 2012 #usopen campaign. LISTEN LIVE NOW: bit.ly/QFpi3J

— US Open Tennis (@usopen) August 30, 2012

Roddick has won at least one tournament in each of the past 12 years, despite his inability to win a Grand Slam since the 2003 U.S. Open. That victory in 2003 made Roddick the youngest American to ever reach No. 1 in the ATP rankings.

Announcements like this are always greeted with Twitter trends and the reaction that goes with it.

NBC4 sports anchor Dan Hellie had this to say regarding how Roddick's career should be perceived:

#Roddick will be looked at as an underachiever but he was the best American tennis player for the better part of a Decade

— Dan Hellie (@DanHellie) August 30, 2012

This serves as a reminder to anyone who will only remember Roddick for his shortcomings. He never managed to reach the heights he hit in 2003, but he was a mainstay on the world-tennis scene from that point on.

BBC correspondent Jonathan Overend gives us an anecdote regarding his favorite Roddick match:

Favourite Roddick match: 03 Aus Open. 5 sets and 5 hours v El Aynaoui. Great play, great sportsmanship.

— Jonathan Overend (@5livetennis) August 30, 2012

This was an epic quarterfinal match that included the longest final set in Grand Slam history.

KSFY anchor Paige Pearson had this to say about Roddick's career:

Regarding #Roddick, timing was his enemy (Fed & Rafa). At moments he was awesome, others infuriating. His game and wit will be missed.

— Paige Pearson (@PAIGER33) August 30, 2012

Definitely true, here. Roddick happened to play with two of the greatest of all time. That did nothing for his Grand Slam hopes.

ESPN commentator Patrick McEnroe made sure to thank Roddick for his contributions to American tennis:

Thanks @andyroddick for all you have done for American tennis

— Patrick McEnroe (@PatrickMcEnroe) August 30, 2012

NBA.com reporter Adam Zagoria gives an outside perspective:

Andy Roddick's retirement announcement comes on his 30th birthday and one day after Kim Clijsters played her final singles match. #USO12

— Adam Zagoria (@AdamZagoria) August 30, 2012

Roddick will be missed. Most reactions seem to show that he was a great person, as well as a great player. He is the last American to win a Grand Slam, and that's memorable in itself.

Here's a great look at how Roddick is viewed as a person by BBC radio tennis commentator David Law:

#Roddick will successful whatever he chooses to do I reckon. Great charity fundraiser, would be a superb Davis Cup captain, commentator.

— DavidLaw (@DavidLawTennis) August 30, 2012

USOpen.org senior writer Erin Bruehl gave us some insight about Roddick's press conference:

Good friend #Mardy Fish stayed for #Roddick press conference, wife @brooklyndecker also present for his announcement.

— Erin Bruehl (@ErinBruehl) August 30, 2012

Decker's presence was easy to guess, but it's great to see unity between Roddick and fellow American competitor Fish.

Sports Illustrated writer Phil Taylor took a lighter approach to Roddick's announcement:

RIP Andy #Roddick. You're 30 yrs old, healthy, wealthy and married to Brooklyn Decker. You haven't retired. You've gone to heaven.

— Phil Taylor (@SI_PhilTaylor) August 30, 2012

Well, he does have a point.