College Football Couture: The Best Player to Wear Every Number from No. 1-No. 99

Chris AndersonCorrespondent IIIAugust 8, 2012

College Football Couture: The Best Player to Wear Every Number from No. 1-No. 99

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    Over the course of college football history, there have been players that have risen above the rest. They pushed their athletic abilities as far as they could, took their teams to new heights, won multiple awards and did everything in their power to become a better athlete. 

    These beasts of men will live throughout the history of college football as some of the greatest ever and will not fade with the test of time. 

    It has been said that a number does not define a player, but rather, a player defines the jersey he wears. 

    For countless years, players have immortalized their own jerseys by surpassing all expectations and becoming college football greats.

    Here are the top players for ever jersey number starting with No. 99 and going all the way down to No. 1. 

99. Hugh Green (DE, Pittsburgh): 1977-1980

1 of 99

    Green was one of the best defensive players of his era and more than earned his selection to Sports Illustrated's All-Century team. He was a first-team All-American in 1978, 1979 and 1980, and a second-team selection in 1977. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Jay Berwanger (RB, Chicago)

    Steve McMichael (DT, Texas)

    Bill Willis (DL, Ohio State)

98. Tom Harmon (HB, Michigan): 1938-1940

2 of 99

    Harmon was an excellent running back for the Wolverines. He won the Heisman in 1940 and rushed for over 2,000 yards during his career at Michigan. He also threw for over 1,300 yards and will always go down in Wolverine lore. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Lawrence Taylor (LB, UNC)

97. Cornelius Bennett (LB, Alabama): 1983-1986

3 of 99

    Bennett was a dominating defensive player who made the All-America team three times. He won the Lombardi Award, SEC Player of the Year Award and finished seventh in the Heisman voting in 1986. 

    Bennett is the man behind "The Sack" and is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Tommie Harris (DT, Oklahoma)

96. Daniel Stubbs (DT, Miami): 1984-1987

4 of 99

    Stubbs was yet another intimidating defensive player on this list, and helped lead the Hurricanes to become the 1987 national champions. In that same year, he would also be selected to the All-America team. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    George Andrews (DE, Nebraska)

    Cortez Kennedy (DT, Miami)

95. Bubba Smith (DE, Michigan State): 1964-1966

5 of 99

    Smith is another player on this list who made the Sports Illustrated All-Century team. With the fans egging him on with the famous chant "Kill, Bubba, Kill," Smith made the most of his time at Michigan State and made the All-America team in 1965 and 1966. 

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and his jersey has been retired at Michigan State.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    John Witte (T, Oregon State)

94. Randy White (DT, Maryland): 1972-1974

6 of 99

    White was originally recruited as a fullback, but made the switch to defense during his sophomore campaign. 

    He won the Outland Trophy, the Lombardi Award and the ACC Player of the Year in 1974. He also was named to the Sports Illustrated All-Century team.

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Tony Franklin (K, Texas A&M)

    Dick Wildung (T, Minnesota)

    Booger McFarland (DT, LSU)

93. Lee Roy Selmon (DT, Oklahoma): 1972-1975

7 of 99

    Helping to lead the Sooners to a national championship in 1974 and 1975, Selmon was part of one of the best defensive units in Oklahoma history.

    He won the Lombardi Award and Outland Trophy in his senior year (1975) and was selected to Sports Illustrated's All-Century team. 

    Selmon was also an All-American in 1974 and 1975. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Ndamukong Suh (DT, Nebraska)

    Aundray Bruce (LB, Auburn)

    Jim Jeffcoat (DE, Arizona State)

    Jim Lalanne (HB, North Carolina)

92. Tony Casillas (DT, Oklahoma): 1983-1985

8 of 99

    Casillas was one of the best defensive players in the history of college football. He helped lead the Sooners to a national championship in 1985 and also was awarded the Lombardi Award in the same year. 

    He was an All-American on the field and in his academics. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2004. 

    Casillas was also named the National Football Foundation's College Defensive Player of the Decade for the 1980s. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Reggie White (DT, Tennessee)

    Vic Bottari (HB, Cal)

    Jeff Siemon (LB, Stanford)

91. Doug Atkins (T, Tennessee): 1950-1952

9 of 99

    One of the most dominant players in SEC history, Atkins helped lead the Volunteers to a national championship in 1952. 

    He is one of the few Tennessee players to have his number retired and will always go down in their history as one of their greatest athletes. 

     

    Honorable Mention

    Dewey Selmon (NG, Oklahoma)

90. George Webster (LB, Michigan State): 1964-1966

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    Webster is yet another player from this list that made Sports Illustrated's All-Century team. He is one of the best players in Michigan State history and became just the second player in school history to have his number retired. 

    Webster is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mention

    Steve Emtman (DT, Washington)

    John Dutton (DT, Nebraska)

    Donnie Shell (S, South Carolina State)

89. Mike Ditka (TE, Pittsburgh): 1958-1960

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    One of the best tight ends in college football history, Ditka had a prolific college career before he accomplished anything at the NFL level. He led Pitt in receiving all three years that he played and was selected to the All-American team in 1960.

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and made Sports Illustrated's All-Century team. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Ross Browner (DE, Notre Dame)

    Charles Young (E, USC)

    Ted Hendricks (DE, Miami)

88. Jerry Rice (WR, Mississippi Valley State): 1981-1984

12 of 99

    Rice could catch any ball you threw to him. He set numerous records throughout his collegiate career and became one of the more prolific offensive players in the history of college football.

    He is part of the College Football Hall of Fame and a member of Sports Illustrated's All-Century team. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Keith Jackson (TE, Oklahoma)

    Randy Moss (WR, Marshall)

    Terry Beasley (WR, Auburn)

87. Billy Ray Smith (DE, Arkansas): 1953-1956

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    Smith was an imposing force on the defensive side of the ball and one of the better defensive players in Arkansas history. 

    He helped the Razorbacks to a Southwest Conference Football Championship and was named to the All-Southwest Conference team in 1956. Smith has received numerous honors from Arkansas and will always be remembered as one of the Razorback greats. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Raymond Berry (E, SMU)

    Bill Carpenter (TE, Army)

    Joe Walton (TE, Pittsburgh)

86. Courtney Brown (DE, Penn State): 1996-1999

14 of 99

    Brown was a big and fast player who could play the defensive end position as good as anybody else in the nation. During his senior campaign, he was an All-Big Ten selection and made first-team All-America. 

    To go along with his other awards, Brown was the Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year and Defensive Lineman of the Year in 1999. He came out of college with the most quarterback sacks in NCAA history. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bob Westfall (FB, Michigan)

    Marlin McKeever (E, USC)

85. Jim Seymour (WR, Notre Dame): 1966-1968

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    Seymour was one of the best wide receivers of his time. He was selected to the first-team All-America team in 1967 and 1968 and will always be known as one of the better wide receivers to come out of Notre Dame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Jack Snow (WR, Notre Dame)

    Daryl Hunt (LB, Oklahoma)

    Andre Wadsworth (DE, FSU)

84. Jerry Robinson (LB, UCLA): 1975-1978

16 of 99

    Originally a tight end, Robinson was pushed to the defensive side of the ball, where he shined for UCLA. 

    He made first-team All-America in 1976, 1977 and 1978, and is part of the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Abe Mickal (RB, LSU)

    John Jefferson (WR, Arizona State)

    Tony Jeter (DE, Nebraska)

83. Richard Wood (LB, USC): 1972-1974

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    Wood was a huge defensive presence for a Trojan team that would win two national championships during his tenure.

    He was a three-time All-American and is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Kellen Winslow (TE, Missouri)

    Bobby Crockett (E, Arkansas)

    Terry Glenn (WR, Ohio State)

    Steve Largent (WR, Tulsa)

82. Leon Hart (TE/DE, Notre Dame): 1946-1949

18 of 99

    Hart was a two-way player that had all the tools to dominate the college football game. He won three national titles with Notre Dame and received the Heisman Trophy and Maxwell Award in 1949.

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and was the first overall pick in the NFL draft. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Ozzie Newsome (TE, Alabama)

    Paul Cleary (E, USC)

    Pete Mitchell (TE, Boston College)

81. Tim Brown (WR, Notre Dame): 1984-1987

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    Brown was one of the most dominant wide receivers in college football history and garnered many accolades during his time at Notre Dame. 

    He won the Heisman Trophy in 1987 and was the first wide receiver to do so. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    George Connor (T, Holy Cross/Notre Dame)

    Ken MacAfee (WR, Notre Dame)

80. Rick Bryan (DT, Oklahoma): 1980-1983

20 of 99

    Bryan was yet another dominating defensive presence for the Oklahoma Sooners. He was a consensus All-American in 1982 and 1983 and is one of the best defensive players in Sooner history.

    He racked 365 tackles during his career and was considered one of the greatest workhorses in college football. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Donn Moomaw (C/LB, UCLA)

    Antonio Bryant (WR, Pittsburgh)

    Stan Kostka (FB, Minnesota)

79. Buck Buchanan (T, Grambling): 1959-1962

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    A Sports Illustrated All-Century selection, Buchanan was an intimidating force on the football field.

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and would later go on to be selected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bill Fralic (T, Pittsburgh)

    Rich Glover (NG, Nebraska)

    Johnathan Ogden (T, UCLA)

78. Bruce Smith: DT, Virginia Tech: 1981-1984

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    "The Sack Man" came out of his Hokie career being one of their most dominant and respected players. During his time at Virginia Tech, Smith totaled 71 sacks and was awarded the Outland Trophy in 1984, as well as being a member of the All-America Team.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Grenny Lansdell (QB, USC)

    Bobby Bell (T, Minnesota)

    Jim Dunaway (T, Ole Miss)

    Robert Gallery (T, Iowa)

77. Red Grange (HB, Illinois): 1923-1925

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    A Sports Illustrated All-Century selection, Grange was one of the key running backs during his time at Illinois. He racked up 3,362 yards over the course of his career and was an All-America selection three years in a row.

    His number is retired at the University of Illinois and he will always go down as one of their best players in history. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Ron Yary (T, USC)

    Barry Krauss (LB, Alabama)

76. Warren Sapp (DT, Miami): 1992-1994

24 of 99

    Before Sapp dominated the big boys at the NFL level, he was tearing up the college football field. The list of awards Sapp earned while at the University of Miami include the Lombardi Award, Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Bill Willis Award, Outland Trophy, Big East Defensive Player of the Year and the Defensive Player of the Year.

    Yeah, he was quite the player. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Carl Eller (T, Minnesota)

    Danny Fortmann (G, Colgate)

    Steve Hutchinson (T, Michigan)

75. Orlando Pace (T, Ohio State): 1994-1996

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    Pace was an easy selection at this number. He was selected to Sports Illustrated's All-Century team, and won the Outland Trophy and Lombardi Award during his tenure at Ohio State. 

    Pace would also finish fourth in the Heisman voting in 1996. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Joe Greene (DE, North Texas State)

    Terry Crouch (T, Oklahoma)

    Howard Weiss (FB, Wisconsin)

74. John Hicks (T, Ohio State): 1970, 1972-1973

26 of 99

    Hicks was yet another great lineman from Ohio State. He helped the Buckeyes to a Big Ten Championship and appear in three Rose Bowls during his career.

    He won the Lombardi Award and Outland Trophy in 1973 and will be remembered as one of the best linemen in the history of college football. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Tracy Rocker (DT, Auburn)

    Sid Fournet (T, LSU)

    Jack Youngblood (DE, Florida)

73. John Hannah (G/T, Alabama): 1970-1972

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    A Sports Illustrated All-Century selection, Hannah was a great lineman at two positions for the Crimson Tide. He played under Bear Bryant and earned All-American honors twice during his tenure at Alabama. 

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and was recognized as the best lineman Bryant ever coached. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Mark May (T, Pittsburgh)

    Ed Beinor (T, Notre Dame)

    Jim Dombrowski (T, Virginia)

72. Bronko Nagurski (FB/DT, Minnesota): 1927-1929

28 of 99

    If you have an award named after you, you know you played well. Nagurski is such a person. He is part of Sports Illustrated's All-Century team and greatly aided Minnesota on both sides of the ball from 1927-1929.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bob Lilly (DT, TCU)

    Dan Dierdorf (OT, Michigan)

    Aurelius Thomas (G, Ohio State)

71. Merlin Olsen (T, Utah State): 1959-1961

29 of 99

    Olsen is one of the more memorable players to come out of Utah State and has been all but immortalized at his alma mater.

    He made the All-American team twice and won the Outland Trophy in 1961. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Tony Boselli (T, USC)

    Brad Budde (G, USC)

70. Bob Gain (T/G, Kentucky): 1947-1950

30 of 99

    Gain was one of the better two-way players in college football history and won the Outland Trophy in 1950.

    He is part of Sports Illustrated's All-Century team and helped the Wildcats to win their one and only SEC Championship. Gain was also a two-time All-American. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Steve Niehaus (DT, Notre Dame)

    Scott Appleton (T, Texas)

    Dave Joyner (T, Penn State)

    Merlin Olsen (T, Utah State) 

69. Tom Brown (G, Minnesota): 1958-1960

31 of 99

    Though he would go on to play in the CFL, Brown was one of the best players during his era on the line. He won the Outland Trophy in 1960 and is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Gil Duggan (T, Oklahoma)

    Gabe Rivera (DT, Texas Tech)

    Clyde Turner (C, Hardin-Simmons)

68. Mike Reid (DT, Penn State): 1966, 1968-1969

32 of 99

    A member of Sports Illustrated's All-Century team, Reid was a dominant force at Penn State. He finished fifth in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1969 and is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Tedy Bruschi (LB, Arizona)

    Mike McKeever (G, USC)

67. Aaron Taylor (T, Nebraska): 1994-1997

33 of 99

    Nebraska was a great lineman at Nebraska and intimidated opposing defenses as he helped to lead the Cornhusker charge down the field. 

    During his tenure at Nebraska, the team won three national titles and was an integral part in making Nebraska one of college football's premier programs. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Russell Maryland (DT, Miami)

    Buddy Burris (OG, Oklahoma)

    Joe Romig (G, Colorado)

66. George Gipp (HB, Notre Dame): 1917-1920

34 of 99

    Although Gipp's death has gained more publicity than his career, he was a great player at Notre Dame and helped the Fighting Irish establish themselves as a national program. He rushed for 2,341 yards during his career and will always be immortalized at Notre Dame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Granville Liggins (NG, Oklahoma)

    Deacon Jones (DE, South Carolina State)

    Rick Redman (G/LB, Washington)

65. Greg Roberts (G, Oklahoma): 1975-1978

35 of 99

    Roberts was an intimidating presence on the offensive side of the ball and helped to lead the Sooner charge down the field. He was an All-American in 1978 and also won the Outland Trophy in that same year. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Joe Schmidt (LB/G, Pittsburgh)

    Bill Krisher (G, Oklahoma)

64. Jim Lachey (G, Ohio State): 1981-1984

36 of 99

    Lachey is a famous guard from Ohio State that helped lead the team down the field from 1981-1984. His performance at the college football level led him to become the 12th overall pick in the 1985 NFL Draft.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bob Brown (G, Nebraska)

    Bud Brooks (G, Arkansas)

    Casey Hampton (DE, Texas)

63. Mike Singletary (LB, Baylor): 1977-1980

37 of 99

    Singletary began his intimidating football career at Baylor. As a Bear, Singeltary was an All-American in 1979 and 1980, and helped to lead the Baylor Bears to become better than they ever had been. He is a two-time recipient of the Dave O'Brien Memorial Trophy and a member of Sports Illustrated's All-Century team. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bill Shakespeare (HB, Notre Dame)

    Booker Brown (T, USC)

    'Dick Modzelewski (T, Maryland)

62. Jim Parker (G, Ohio State): 1954-1956

38 of 99

    Parker was an integral part of an Ohio State offensive line that dominated opponents for all the seasons that he was part of the team. 

    He was a two-time All-American selection, won the Outland Trophy in 1956 and even garnered Heisman recognition as he finished 8th in the balloting. 

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and Sports Illustrated's All-Century team. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Charley Trippi (HB, Georgia)

    Al Krueger (E, USC)

    Bud Wilkinson (QB/G, Minnesota)

61. Jim Lynch (LB, Notre Dame): 1964-1966

39 of 99

    Lynch was a versatile linebacker at Notre Dame and one of the better players of his generation. He captained the defense for the Irish during their 1966 national championship run, while also winning the Maxwell Award. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bud McFadin (G/T, Texas)

    Endicott Peabody III (G, Harvard)

    Zeke Smith (G, Auburn)

60. Chuck Bednarik (C/LB, Penn): 1946-1948

40 of 99

    Bednarik is yet another player who has an award named after him. Being such, there is probably no greater athlete to be immortalized at his position and he will always go down in history as one of the greats. 

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and was named to Sports Illustrated's All-Century team. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Tommy Nobis (LB/G, Texas)

    Hardiman Cureton (G, UCLA)

    Weldon Humble (G, Rice, Louisiana-Lafayette)

59. Alex Agase (G, Purdue and Illinois): 1941-1943, 1946

41 of 99

    Agase was a lineman and scored two touchdowns in one game; that should tell you something about the kind of player he was. He was an All-American both on the college football field and in the army, and even received a Purple Heart after being injured in action after taking part in the Battle of Okinawa. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Vern Huffman (RB, Indiana)

    Andy Bershak (E, North Carolina)

    Joe DeLamielleure (G, Michigan State)

58. Peter Boulware (DE, Florida State): 1994-1996

42 of 99

    A Sports Illustrated All-Century selection, Boulware was a ferocious linebacker for FSU. He was named an All-American, All-ACC, ACC Defensive Player of the Year and the National Defensive Player of the Year (Football News) in 1996. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Hoyt Winslett (E, Alabama)

    Cornell Brown (LB, Virginia Tech)

    Nick Drahos (T, Cornell)

    Lofa Tatupu (LB, USC)

57. Dwight Stephenson (C, Alabama): 1977-1979

43 of 99

    Stephenson was an intimidating force on the offensive side of the ball and deserves to be recognized at this spot. He was an All-American selection and eventually became one of the better centers in the history of the game. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Steve Kiner (LB, Tennessee)

    Billy Patterson (QB, Baylor)

    George Roscoe (HB, Minnesota).

56. Michael Barrow (LB, Miami): 1988-1992

44 of 99

    Barrow helped to lead a Miami team that was one of the best in the nation defensively. While playing for the Hurricanes, Barrow collected two national championships and was a first-team All-American in 1992. 

    He was an intimidating force on the defense and will always be remembered as one of the greater linebackers produced by "The U."

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Rudy Mobley (HB, Hardin Simmons)

    Rick Casares (FB, Floirda)

    Hal Miller (T, Georgia Tech)

55. Derrick Thomas (DL, Alabama): 1985-1988

45 of 99

    Thomas was part of one of the best defensive lines in college football. He won the Butkus Award in 1988 and set an NCAA sack record with 27. 

    Thomas finished 10th in Heisman voting that year and will always be one of the better defensive players to have played in college football. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Marvin Jones (LB, Florida State)

    Bob Fenimore (HB, Oklahoma State)

    Jammal Brown (OT, Oklahoma)

    Junior Seau (LB, USC)

54. Lee Roy Jordan (LB, Alabama): 1960-1962

46 of 99

    Another Sports Illustrated All-century selection, Jordan was a linebacker at Alabama and was one of the best players of his time. He won a national championship while with the Crimson Tide and received an All-American selection for his senior campaign. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bruce Smith (HB, Minnesota)

    Dwight Freeney (DE, Syracuse)

    Dixie Howell (RB, Alabama)

53. Randy Gradishar (LB, Ohio State): 1971-1973

47 of 99

    Heralded as the best linebacker that Woody Hayes ever coached, Gradishar was an intimidating force on the defensive side of the ball and used his prowess to garner numerous awards and accolades throughout his college football career. 

    He was a two-time All-American and finished sixth in the 1973 Heisman Balloting. He is also the member of the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Ken Bernich (LB, Auburn)

    Corey Simon (DL, Florida State)

    Clay Shiver (C, FSU)

52. Ray Lewis (LB, Miami): 1993-1995

48 of 99

    Ray Lewis has been a beast of a football player ever since his days at Miami. He contributed right from the start and quickly became one of the more significant players on an intimidating Miami defense. 

    He was an All-American in all three years that he played college football and built the skills necessary to succeed in the NFL at Miami. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Harry Gilmer (QB/HB, Alabama)

    Jack Del Rio (LB, USC)

51. Kurt Burris (C, Oklahoma): 1951-1954

49 of 99

    Burris was a center for Oklahoma and finished second in the 1954 Heisman campaign. Now that is impressive. 

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and was nominated to the All-America team in 1954. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Ken Houston (LB, Prairie View A&M)

    Pat Fitzgerald (LB, Northwestern)

    Ken Kavanaugh (E, LSU)

50. Dick Butkus (C/LB, Illinois): 1962-1964

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    The Dick Butkus Award is given out to college football's best linebacker every season and is named for a player that is on Sports Illustrated's All-Century team. 

    Butkus was a great player during his time and a two-time All-American for Illinois. He finished sixth in the Heisman balloting and will always be remembered as one of the best linebackers in college football history. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Dave Rimington (C, Nebraska)

    Jack Cloud (FB, William and Mary)

    Bob Pellegrini (C, Maryland)

49. Bob Chappuis (HB, Michigan): 1942, 1946-1947

51 of 99

    Chappuis was one of the great early running backs in college football. He was an All-American in 1947 and the MVP of the 1948 Rose Bowl. Though Chappuis would never win the Heisman, he finished second in the balloting in 1947. 

    He played both quarterback and running back and is one of the more versatile players to have played the game. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bob Mathias (FB, Stanford)

    Chuck Ortmann (QB/HB, Michigan)

    Julius Peppers (DE, North Carolina)

48. Gale Sayers (RB, Kansas): 1962-1964

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    Is there anybody else who deserves to be in this spot other than Sayers? Sayers was the epitome of a running back and could do just about anything on the field. He rushed for over 2,600 yards during his tenure at Kansas and is one of the best runners in college football history. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Angelo Bertelli (QB, Notre Dame)

    Ki Aldrich (C, TCU),

    Otto Graham (QB, Northwestern)

    Terrell Suggs (LB, Arizona State)

47. Michael Irvin (WR, Miami): 1985-1987

53 of 99

    Irvin has been a playmaker for his entire life. While at Miami, Irvin set records for receptions, touchdown receptions and receiving yards. He won a national championship with the Hurricanes and is considered to be one of the greatest players to have ever set his foot on the field for "The U."

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bennie Oosterbaan (E, Michigan) 

    Matt Blair (LB, Iowa)

    AJ Hawk (LB, Ohio State)

46. Bob Ferguson (FB, Ohio State): 1959-1961

54 of 99

    Ferguson was one of the most bruising and intimidating fullbacks in college football history.

    He was an All-American in 1960 and 1961 and even finished second in the Heisman Voting in 1961. Ferguson would also win the 1961 UPI College Football Player of the Year and the Maxwell Award. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Harry Newman (QB, Michigan)

    Ken Hatfield (HB, Arkansas)

    Roosevelt Leaks (RB, Texas)

45. Archie Griffin (RB, Ohio State): 1972-1975

55 of 99

    Sammy Baugh was good, but Archie Griffin was so much better. He is the only player to win two Heismans and rushed for over 5,500 yards during his prolific career at Ohio State. He crushed records as they presented themselves to him and will always be remembered as one of the college football greats.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Sammy Baugh (QB, Texas Christian)

    Jeff Davis (LB, Clemson)

    Glenn Dobbs (HB, Tulsa)

44. Jim Brown (RB, Syracuse): 1954-1956

56 of 99

    Jim Brown was another one of those players on this list that changed the way college football was played. He used his speed and physicality to blow past defenders and created the base for an illustrious football career that would span into the NFL. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Ernie Davis (RB, Syracuse)

    Donny Anderson (HB, Texas Tech)

    Brian Bosworth (LB, Oklahoma)

    Tony Gonzalez (TE, Cal)

43. Terry Kinard (S, Clemson): 1978-1982

57 of 99

    Kinard was a Sports Illustrated All-Century selection and a two-time first-team All-American. He was one of the better defensive players of his era and was the CBS National Defensive Player of the year in 1982. 

    Kinard is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bob Crable (LB, Notre Dame)

    Lindy Berry (QB, TCU)

    Troy Polamalu (S, USC)

42. Ronnie Lott (S, USC): 1977-1980

58 of 99

    Lott was more than an amazing college football player. He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and helped lead a USC team to greatness throughout his years at the program. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Marshall Goldberg (FB/HB, Pittsburgh)

    Ricky Bell (RB, USC)

    Paul Warfield (HB, Ohio State)

41. Glenn Davis (RB, Army): 1950s

59 of 99

    Davis was one of the best college football players in history. "Mr. Outside" is ranked 13th on ESPN's Top 25 Players in College Football and set numerous records while he was at Army. He was a three-time All-America selection and a multi-sport athlete. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Keith Byars (RB, Ohio State)

    Charlie Flowers (FB, Ole Miss)

    Paul Governali (HB, Columbia)

40. Howard Cassady (RB/DB, Ohio State): 1952-1955

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    Cassady deserves to be on this list of great players as he stood out on both the offensive and defensive sides of the ball.

    He scored 37 touchdowns over his career and was awarded the Maxwell Award and Associated Press Athlete of the Year in 1955. He wowed everybody who watched him play and is one of the all-time Buckeye greats. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Elroy Hirsch (RB, Wisconsin)

    Mike Haynes (DB, Arizona State)

    Dana Howard (LB, Illinois)

39. Sam Cunningham (FB, USC): 1970-1972

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    No question here, Cunningham is the definition of the No. 39 at the college football level. He was a 1972 All-American and gave USC the power to make their way to the top of the college football ranks. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    John Kimbrough (FB, Texas A&M)

    Larry Csonka (FB, Syracuse)

    Darrell Thompson (HB, Minnesota)

38. George Rogers (RB, South Carolina): 1977-1980

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    Rogers was the Heisman winner in 1980 and earned All-American honors that year as well. He was a bruising player who could break out into the open field and burn defenders on just about any play. Rogers used his large size to intimidate any defender who came his way. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Sam Francis (FB, Nebraska)

    Burr Baldwin (E, UCLA)

    Ed Bock (OG, Iowa State)

37. Doak Walker (RB, Southern Methodist): 1945, 1947-1949

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    There have been a lot of great players to wear No. 37, but Walker is by far the best. He helped SMU achieve greatness and has an award named after him that is given to the top running back in college football every year.

    Doak Walker is one of the top college players of all time. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Creighton Miller (HB, Notre Dame)

    Shaun Alexander (RB, Alabama)

    Tommy Casanova (DB, LSU)

36. Steve Owens (HB, Oklahoma): 1967-1969

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    Owens was a versatile back who flashed greatness at the college football level. He was an All-American in 1969 and went on to win the Heisman Trophy that year as well.

    Owens will always go down as one of the greater backs in Sooner history.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Chris Spielman (LB, Ohio State)

    Bennie Blades (S, Miami)

    Ray Buivid (QB, Marquette)

35. Doc Blanchard (RB, Army): 1944-1946

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    Blanchard was ahead of his time and the competition. He was the first junior to win the Maxwell Award and Heisman in 1945. Blanchard would slash defenses up the middle and created quite a name for himself both in the Army and on the college football field. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Tank Younger (RB, Grambling)

    Alan Ameche (RB, Wisconsin)

    Ken Simonton (Oregon State)

34. Herschel Walker (RB, Georgia): 1980-1982

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    Herschel Walker is the best player that has ever set foot on a college football field. There are no questions about it and he deserves every accolade he receives. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bo Jackson (RB, Auburn)

    Franco Harris (RB, Penn State)

    Walter Payton (RB, Jackson State)

    Ricky Williams (RB, Texas)

33. Tony Dorsett (TB, Pittsburgh): 1973-1976

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    Dorsett impressed from a very young age, as he received All-America honors in his freshman season. He obliterated opposing defenses with his speed and brutality, and could not be stopped on the football field.

    He won the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Walter Camp Award for his efforts during his senior season in 1976. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Herb Joesting (FB, Minnesota)

    Marcus Allen (RB, USC)

    Ron Dayne (TB, Wisconsin)

32. O.J. Simpson (RB, USC): 1967-1968

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    Say all you want about his off-field issues, Simpson could dazzle on the football field. One of the greatest running backs of his generation, Simpson changed the way the running game was perceived and there were hardly any equals to him during his time in college.

    As a college football player, he won the Heisman Trophy, the Maxwell Award, the Walter Camp Award and was awarded the UPI Player of the Year in both 1967 and 1968. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Johnny Lujack (QB, Notre Dame)

    Cedric Benson (RB, Texas)

    Al Blozis (T, Georgetown)

31. Vic Janowicz (HB, Ohio State): 1949-1951

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    Janowicz was a great back at Ohio State, who was one of the most versatile athletes for the Buckeyes. He ran, passed, kicked and punted the ball for the Buckeyes and contributed much more than people know. He won the Heisman Trophy in 1950 and is one of the better players in Ohio State history. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Shane Conlan (LB, Penn State)

    Dick Anderson (S, Colorado)

    Dre Bly (CB, North Carolina)

30. Mike Rozier (RB, Nebraska): 1981-1983

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    In 1983, Rozier rushed for over 2,100 yards while bringing home the Heisman Trophy to Nebraska. He scored 29 touchdowns that season and will always be remembered as one of the greatest to play the running back position, as he finished with a career total of 4,780 rushing yards. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Greg Pruitt (RB, Oklahoma)

    Steve Worster (FB, Texas)

    Alex Wojceechowicz (C, Fordham University)

29. Eric Turner (S, UCLA): 1987-1990

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    Tuner was one of the best defenders in Bruin history and will always go down as one of the UCLA greats. He was an All-American in 1990 and helped to lead the Bruins' defensive efforts. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bruce Smith (HB, Minnesota)

    Tay Brown (T, USC)

    Wear Schoonover (E, Arkansas)

28. Anthony Davis (RB, USC): 1972-1974

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    Despite all the great running backs to come from the West Coast, Anthony Davis was the first to rush for over 1,000 yards in three seasons. He helped lead the Trojans to national titles in 1972 and 1974. 

    Davis finished second in Heisman voting in 1974; a vote that changed the history of how the trophy voting would be determined. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Marshall Faulk (RB, San Diego State)

    George Cumby (LB, Oklahoma)

    Warrick Dunn (RB, FSU)

    Adrian Peterson (RB, Oklahoma)

27. Eddie George (RB, Ohio State): 1992-1995

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    1,927 yards, 24 touchdowns and the Heisman trophy. Those were just some of the accolades George earned during his senior season in 1995 at Ohio State. 

    George was one of the most versatile backs in college football during his days and was recently inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Joe Bellino (HB, Navy)

    Steve Atwater (DB, Arkansas)

    Terrell Buckey (CB, FSU)

26. Riley Smith (QB/FB, Alabama): 1933-1935

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    Smith was a do-it-all player. He played safety, punter, kicker and quarterback for an Alabama team that was quite potent during their time.

    He was a two-time All-American and will always go down in Oklahoma history as one of their greatest. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Jack Mitchell (QB, Oklahoma)

    Jon Arnett (HB, USC)

25. Tommy McDonald (RB, Oklahoma): 1954-1956

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    McDonald was one of those players who played bigger than his size. Standing just 5'9", McDonald blazed through defenders and was one of the tougher players in college football during his time.

    He won the Maxwell Award and finished second in voting in 1956, despite garnering most of the first-place votes. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Ronnie Bull (HB, Baylor)

    Raghib Ismall (HB, Notre Dame)

    Fred Biletnikoff (WR, FSU)

24. Joe Washington (RB, Oklahoma): 1974-1975

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    A member of the College Football Hall of Fame, Washington is one of the more memorable running backs to come out of Oklahoma.

    He finished his career with 4,071 rushing yards and finished third in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1974. He was also a two-time first-team All-American. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Nile Kinnick (HB, Iowa) 

    Willie Brown (DB, Grambling)

    Pete Dawkins (HB, Army)

23. Jim Swink (RB, TCU): 1954-1956

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    Swink is one of the better running backs in TCU history, and helped to lead the Frogs to conference championships in 1955 and 1956.

    He was named an All-American in two of his seasons and finished as a Heisman runner-up to Howard Cassady in 1955.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Leroy Keyes (RB, Purdue)

    Johnny Roland (RB/DB, Missouri)

    Lance Alworth (HB, Arkansas)

22. Doug Flutie (QB, Boston College): 1987-1989

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    If you are a college football fan, you know who Doug Flutie is. Though he is mostly recognized for his Hail Mary heroics against Miami, Flutie also threw for over 10,579 yards, which were the most in NCAA history at the time.

    Boston College was the only Division 1-A school to recruit Flutie and it sure paid off for them. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Emmitt Smith (RB, Florida)

    Joe Dudek (RB, Plymouth State)

    Lynn Swann (WR, USC)

21. Barry Sanders (HB, Oklahoma State): 1985-1988

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    If you didn't know this already, Barry Sanders was amazing. He set 34 NCAA records in his 1988 campaign while also taking home the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and the Walter Camp Award. 

    He blazed a path for Oklahoma State and was the figurehead of an amazing offense. Sanders will always be remembered crushing opposing defenses for OK State and garnishing the No. 21. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Desmond Howard (WR/KR, Michigan)

    Hunk Anderson (G, Notre Dame)

    Reggie Dupard (RB, SMU)

20. Earl Campbell (RB, Texas): 1974-1977

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    Campbell was one of the college greats during his era. He rushed for 4,443 yards and 41 touchdowns, while garnering many accolades from his coaches and peers.

    He won the Heisman Trophy in 1977.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Johnny Rogers (KR/WR, Nebraska)

    Johnny Bailey (HB, Texas A&I)

    Bernie Kosar, (QB, Miami)

19. Eric Dickerson (RB, SMU): 1979-1982

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    Dickerson was one of two backs part of the famous "Pony Express" at SMU. He gained just under 4,500 yards on the ground and there was no other running back in the nation during his time that displayed the finesse and brutality than he did at his position.

    He finished third in the Heisman voting in 1982 and will always be regarded as one of the college greats to come out of SMU. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Rashaan Salaam (TB, Colorado)

    Jack Cannon (G, Notre Dame)

    Clint Castleberry (HB, Georgia Tech)

18. Archie Manning (QB, Ole Miss): 1968-1970

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    Manning was one of the best quarterbacks in Ole Miss history, and finished third in the Heisman voting in 1970.

    A member of the College Football Hall of Fame, Manning was heralded by Bear Bryant as the greatest college quarterback he would ever see play. 

    He was named the SEC's Quarterback of the Quarter Century from 1950-1975. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Roman Gabriel (QB, N.C. State)

    Jim Crowley (RB, Notre Dame)

    Billy Lothridge (QB, Georgia Tech)

17. Charlie Ward (QB, Florida State): 1989-1993

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    Charlie Ward could do just about anything. He played basketball and football at Florida State and was even drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers in the 59th round in the 1993 free-agent draft and the 18th round by the New York Yankees in 1994. 

    Despite his numerous accolades in other sports (he would go on to play in the NBA), Ward always had a knack for football and helped to lead the Seminoles to national prominence.

    He led the Seminoles to their first national championship and won the Heisman Trophy in stunning fashion. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Bobby Dodd (QB, Tennessee)

    Johnny Mack Brown (RB, Alabama)

    Steve Van Buren (FB, LSU)

16. Peyton Manning (QB, Tennessee): 1994-1997

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    Manning quickly ascended the ranks at Tennessee and soon became a household name.

    Over his career as a Volunteer, he won the Maxwell Award, Davey O'Brien Award, the Johnny Unitas Award and the Best College Player ESPY.

    He finished second in Heisman voting the year Charles Woodson won the prestigious award.  

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Johnny Unitas (QB, Louisville)

    Gary Beban (QB, UCLA)

    Chuck Ealey (QB, Toledo)

    Jim Plunkett (QB, Stanford)

15. Tommy Frazier (QB, Nebraska): 1992-1995

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    Tommy Frazier is considered to be one of the greatest players in the history of college football. He led the University of Nebraska to two straight national championships and was selected to Sport Illustrated's All-Century team.

    Hampered by injuries throughout his career (mostly due to a blood clot in his leg), Frazier was great, but never received the proper recognition for his play. He finished second in Heisman voting in 1995 and was awarded the Sporting News' Offensive Player of the Year in 1995. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Jimmy Harris (QB, Oklahoma)

    Tim Tebow (QB, Florida)

    Drew Brees (QB, Purdue)

14. Vinny Testaverde (QB, Miami): 1983-1986

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    In his two years as a quarterback at Miami, Testaverde was quite good. He played a crucial role in making Miami "The U" and won a Heisman Trophy in 1986. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Eric Berry (S, Tennessee)

    Todd Blackledge (QB, Penn State)

    Don Hutson (E, Alabama)

    Johnny Lattner (HB, Notre Dame)

13. Dan Marino (QB, Pittsburgh): 1979-1982

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    Before all of his NFL accolades, Dan Marino was one of the better quarterbacks in college football. While he does not have a Heisman award to his name, Marino played admirably in all his seasons and finished fourth in the Heisman voting in 1981. 

    Marino was an efficient quarterback for the Panthers and one of the best they have ever seen. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Frankie Albert (QB, Stanford)

    Gino Torretta (QB, Miami)

    Charlie O'Rourke (HB, Boston College)

12. Roger Staubach (QB, Navy): 1962-1964

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    Roger Staubach is one of the more notable players to come out of the Navy football program. Not only serving in the Navy during the height of the Red Scare, Staubach won both the Maxwell and Heisman Trophy in his junior season.

    He helped to lead the Midshipmen to a national championship appearance (one they lost), as well as a big win over Notre Dame. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Chris Cagle (RB, Louisiana-Lafayette and Army)

    Turner Gill (QB, Nebraska)

    Colt McCoy (QB, Texas)

    Bob Griese (QB, Purdue)

    Joe Roth (QB, Cal)

    Charles White (RB, USC)

    Joe Namath (QB, Alabama)

11. Matt Leinart (QB, USC): 2002-2006

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    Matt Leinart helped to make USC one of the most potent teams in college football history during his tenure as quarterback. Along with Reggie Bush, Leinart lit up opposing defenses and is heralded as one of the greatest college football quarterbacks of all time.

    He won the Heisman trophy and led the Trojans to a BCS National Championship in 2004. Leinart finished his career with 807 completions for 10,693 yards and 99 touchdowns. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Steve Spurrier (QB, Florida)

    LaVar Arrington (LB, Penn State)

    Terry Baker (QB, Oregon State)

    Derek Johnson (LB, Texas) 

10. Vince Young (QB, Texas): 2003-2005

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    Along with Matt Leinart, Vince Young truly set unprecedented levels for production at the quarterback position in college football.

    He was the epitome of a dual-threat quarterback and was the first player in NCAA I-A history to pass for 3,000 yards and rush for 1,000 yards in the same season. Young's greatest accomplishment came when he led the Longhorns to a huge victory over the USC Trojans in what is considered one of the greatest games in college football history.

    He finished his tenure at Texas with a 30-2 record and will always be considered one of the greatest players in college history.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Babe Parilli (QB, Kentucky)

    Marquel Blackwell (QB, South Florida)

    Troy Smith (QB, Ohio State)

9. Steve McNair (QB, Alcorn State): 1991-1994

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    To play in Division I-AA and earn the accolades that Steve McNair with is more than impressive. 

    During his time at the college level, McNair was one of the more prolific passers and runners in the game. He finished with numerous accolades and gained nearly 6,000 yards in the air and on the ground during his senior season. He was awarded the Walter Payton Award and finished third in the Heisman voting for his senior campaign. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Don McPherson (QB, Syracuse)

    Dennis Franklin (QB, Michigan)

    Jim McMahon (QB, BYU)

    Peter Warrick (KR/WR, Florida State)

8. Davey O'Brien (QB, TCU): 1935-1938

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    Davey O'Brien was one of those players who could win any game that he played in. He still holds the NCAA record for the most rushing and passing plays in a single season and led one of the more potent offenses in college football at the time of his play. 

    He was the first player to win the Heisman, Maxwell and Walter Camp awards in the same year and is still lauded as one of the more historic quarterbacks at TCU. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Harold Muller (E, Cal)

    Troy Aikman (QB, UCLA),

    David Carr, (QB, Fresno State)

    Steve Young (QB, BYU)

7. John Elway (QB, Stanford): 1979-1982

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    Though Elway never led the Cardinal to a bowl game during his tenure at Stanford, he is still regarded as one of the best players in college football history (he is ranked 15th on ESPN's Top 25 Players in College Football History). 

    Elway threw for over 9,300 yards in his career and is in the College Football Hall of Fame because of his efforts. He finished second in the Heisman voting in 1982 and is regarded as one of the top players in Pac-10 history. 

    While his NFL career will always be remembered over his college football days, Elway started his path to greatness at Stanford. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Danny Wueffrel (QB, Florida)

    Eric Couch (QB, Nebraska)

    Ben Roethlisberger (QB, Miami (OH)

    Pat Sullivan (QB, Auburn)

    Joe Theismann (QB, Notre Dame)

    Michael Vick (QB, Virginia Tech)

6. Robbie Bosco (QB, ByU): 1983-1985

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    To say Bosco had big shoes to fill at BYU is an understatement. Taking over for the great Steve Young, Bosco led the Cougars to a perfect record and their one and only national championship, when he led them to a 24-17 victory over the Michigan Wolverines. 

    Though Bosco never garnered any accolades at the NFL level, he was an absolute passing machine at the college level. He finished third in the Heisman voting in 1984 and 1985 and will go down as one of the best quarterbacks in BYU history. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Johnny Cain (HB, Alabama)

    Tim McDonald (S, USC)

    Harry Kipke (HB, Michigan)

    Sonny Sixkiller (QB, Washington)

    Marc Wilson (QB, BYU)

5. Reggie Bush (RB, USC): 2003-2005

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    Reggie Bush helped to define an entirely new era in college football. Say all you want about his "scandal" at USC, the kid could play football.

    On the football field, Bush was a man among boys. He used his power and speed to get past any defender that was in the way and was virtually unstoppable on the field. Though he has been stripped of many of his titles, Bush will go down as one of the greatest players in college football history. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Paul Hornung (QB, Notre Dame) 

    Kevin Butler (K, Georgia)

    Kenny Easley (S, UCLA)

    Edgerrin James (RB, Miami)

    Donovan McNabb (QB, Syracuse)

    LaDainian Tomlinson (RB, TCU).

4. Brett Favre (QB, Southern Mississippi): 1987-1990

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    Brett Favre made the most of the only scholarship offer he received. Once a seventh-string quarterback, Favre quickly elevated his play and proved to his coaches that he could compete at an elite level.

    He finished his career at Southern Mississippi with school records for most plays, most total yards gained, most passing yards, most completions, most passing attempts and most touchdowns. 

    While there may have been more marquee names in the nation at the time, Favre will always be associated with the No. 4. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Terrence Newman (DB, Kansas State)

    Jason Hansen (K, Washington State)

    Jim Harbaugh (QB, Michigan)

    Jamelle Holieway (QB, Oklahoma)

3. Joe Montana (QB, Notre Dame): 1975-1978

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    Before all the greatness that was to come for him at the NFL level, Montana was lighting up defenses at the University of Notre Dame. 

    Once being the third-string quarterback, Montana quickly proved to his coaches that he was a gem. He helped to lead the Fighting Irish to victory over top-ranked Texas in the 1977 Cotton Bowl and a NCAA national championship. 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Carson Palmer (QB, USC)

    Russell Erxleben (K, Texas)

    Ralph Gugliemi (QB, Notre Dame)

    Keyshawn Johnson (WR, USC)

2. Charles Woodson (DB, Michigan): 1995-1998

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    Woodson is known as one of the best defensive players in the history of college football. He was just the third Wolverine to win the Heisman in their prolific school history and did so as a defensive back. 

    The definition of a ball hawk, Woodson was known for his big plays and ability to elevate his already great team. He was voted No. 11 on ESPN's Top 25 Players in College Football History.

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Deion Sanders (CB, Florida State)

    Ralph Baker (RB, Northwestern)

    Tim Couch (QB, Kentucky)

    Tom Clements (QB, Notre Dame)

    Mike Doss (CB, Ohio State)

1. Anthony Carter (WR, Michigan): 1979-1982

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    Anthony "Snake" Carter made a name for himself at receiver, despite the run-oriented attack of the Michigan Wolverines during his time at the University. He became one of the most productive wide receivers in Wolverine history and used his speed to blow past defenders.

    He was an All-American in 1980, 1981 and 1982, and finished his Michigan career with team records for touchdowns, receptions, receiving yards, touchdown receptions, punt returns, punt return yardage, kickoff returns and kickoff return yardage (though he is now mostly second in all those categories). 

     

    Honorable Mentions

    Ernie Nevers (FB, Stanford)

    Derrick Alexander (WR, Michigan)

    Braylon Edwards (WR, Michigan)

    Lawrence Phillips (RB, Nebraska)

    Larry Fitzgerald (WR, Pittsburgh)