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MLB All-Star Game: The All-Time All-Star Starting Lineup

Anthony RizzutiSenior Analyst IIIOctober 11, 2016

MLB All-Star Game: The All-Time All-Star Starting Lineup

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    The 2012 MLB All-Star Game is now less than 24 hours away. In addition to being an X-factor of sorts for the upcoming World Series, the annual exhibition is an extravagant celebration.

    On this night, we celebrate our players, our cities and most of all, the game of baseball. 

    So why not celebrate the greatest performers in All-Star game history? 

    This is not a compilation of the greatest players to ever play in the All-Star game, but one that pays tribute to the stars that have shined brightest at the Midsummer Classic. 

    Here is the all-time starting lineup of the top performers in the event's history.

Starting Pitcher: Juan Marichal

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    Selections: 10 (1962, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971)

    Statistics: 2-0, 0.50 ERA, 18.0 IP, 12 SO

    Right hander Juan Marichal earned himself 10 All-Star selections and the starting nod in this lineup.

    The all-time San Francisco Giants great pitched to a minuscule 0.50 earned run average, allowing just one run and seven hits in 18 innings. Marichal also chalked up two victories, good for the second highest total in All-Star game history.

Catcher: Johnny Bench

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    Selections: 14 (1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1983) 

    Statistics: .357 AVG (10-for-28), 3 HR, 6 RBI, 5 R, 1.079 OPS

    If he isn't atop your list of the game's greatest catchers, Johnny Bench is certainly No. 1 here.

    A fundamental spoke in the daunting "Big Red Machine," Bench appeared in 14 midsummer classics during his illustrious career.

    He collected six hits in 20 at-bats, three of them coming by way of the long ball. Bench also collected the sixth highest amount of total bases with 19.

    The Hall of Famer is tied with Gary Carter for the most home runs in All-Star game history by a catcher.

First Baseman: Steve Garvey

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    Selections: 10 (1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1985)

    Statistics: .393 AVG (11-for-28), 2 HR, 7 RBI, 7 R, 1.254 OPS

    Steve Garvey certainly made the most out of his 10 All-Star selections.

    In those games, Garvey hit at an impressive .393 clip with two homers and seven runs batted in. His 11 hits are tied for sixth all-time, and his 1.254 OPS ranks fifth. 

Second Baseman: Alfonso Soriano

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    Selections: Seven (2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008)

    Statistics: .357 (5-for-14), 3 HR, 6 RBI, 4 R, 1.357 OPS

    Although he is currently stationed out in left field for the Cubbies, Alfonso Soriano made the majority of his All-Star appearances as a second baseman. He did it twice as a member of the New York Yankees and twice as a member of the Texas Rangers.

    Soriano's 1.357 OPS ranks second in the game's history. His three homer total is also tied for fourth all-time. No player in All-Star game history has ever hit for a higher slugging percentage than Soriano (1.000 SLG).

Third Baseman: Brooks Robinson

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    Selections: 18 (1960, 1960, 1961, 1961, 1962, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974)

    Statistics: .289 AVG (13-for-45), 1 HR, 5 RBI, 5 R, .808 OPS  

    Our hot corner will be occupied by none other than Brooks Robinson.

    Robinson, an 18-time All-Star, was obviously no stranger to the event. He batted in and scored five runs in his appearances and nearly hit at a .300 clip in 45 at-bats.

    His 13 hits are tied for fourth all-time, ranking behind a couple of names you will see very shortly.

Shortstop: Cal Ripken Jr.

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    Selections: 19 (1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001)

    Statistics: .265 (13-for-49), 2 HR, 8 RBI, 4 R, .757 OPS

    Even though New York's Derek Jeter has compiled an incredible .435 batting average in his 11 games, Cal Ripken's total work trumps the Yankees shortstop.

    In a ridiculous 19 All-Star appearances, Ripken has ripped (apologies for the bad pun) 13 hits and two homers. He also chalked up eight RBI and scored four of his own.

    Ripken's homer in the 2001 All-Star game was nothing short of iconic and is truly one of the greatest moments in the event's history. 

Outfielder: Willie Mays

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    Selections: 24 (1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1959, 1960, 1960, 1961, 1961, 1962, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973)

    Statistics: .307 AVG (23-for-75), 3 HR, 9 RBI, 20 R, .899 OPS

    After appearing in an astronomical 24 All-Star games, Willie Mays could have landed here by default. But the fact that his average sits at an strong .307 mark after 75 at-bats is very telling of exactly how great he was.

    The Say Hey Kid sits atop nearly every major offensive category in All-Star game history. Mays ranks first in selections, at-bats, plate appearances, runs scored, hits, total bases, singles, triples and stolen bases. 

Outfielder: Ted Williams

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    Selections: 19 (1940, 1941, 1942, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1959, 1960, 1960)

    Statistics: .304 AVG (14-for-46), 4 HR, 12 RBI, 10 R, 1.091 OPS

    Ted Williams is arguably the greatest hitter in the history of Major League Baseball. And although they were only exhibition games, his All-Star performances proved it.

    While batting against the very best hurlers the era had to offer, Williams compiled 14 hits in 46 at-bats. He is tops in All-Star game history in runs batted in as well as walks. Ted's four homers are also tied for second all-time. 

Outfielder: Stan Musial

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    Selections: 24 (1943, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1959, 1960, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1962, 1963)

    Statistics: .317 AVG (20-for-63), 6 HR, 10 RBI, 11 R, 1.029 OPS

    Rounding out our lineup is the incomparable Stan Musial.

    Otherwise known as "The Man," Stan made the most of his 24 appearances. Musial hit a clean .317 in 24 appearances, chalking up 20 hits over 63 at-bats.

    His six homers are tops all-time—two dingers above the aforementioned Ted Williams. In addition, Musial ranks first in total bases and games and second in hits, runs batted in and runs scored.

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