5 Exciting and Fair College Football Playoff Proposals

Neil ShulmanCorrespondent IJune 22, 2012

5 Exciting and Fair College Football Playoff Proposals

0 of 6

    There is a playoff in every sport, at every level, from college lacrosse to professional hockey, from high school swimming to Little League baseball.

    Except for one: college football.

    Instead of crowning a champion the way everybody else does, the lords of America's greatest sport—bowl directors and BCS "cartel" members—would rather stuff their own pockets with money than spread it out to universities and television stations and, in the process, gift fans with a real way to decide who is best.

    Maybe Death to the BCS was right. This really is borderline corruption.

    I'm not going to plagiarize the beautiful work of art put together by Jeff Passan, Dan Wetzel and Josh Peter. If you haven't read Death to the BCS, I highly recommend you put it on your Christmas list. What I am going to do is quickly paraphrase their points for the benefit of those who haven't read it yet, to explain why the BCS has to go; then I will go my own separate route and propose five seemingly wacky but actually realistic—not to mention highly entertaining—playoff plans.

    There is no legitimate reason not to institute a playoff. Oh, sure, BCS backers have plenty of illegitimate reasons, but none of them would actually stop a playoff from happening. Before I get to my proposals, let's run them off quickly:

    Academics: Under each proposal I drew up here, student athletes would all have at least 21 days to focus on their final exams. Besides, bowl practices interfere with their study schedules anyway. Nice try. This argument is probably the weakest.

    Money: For the bowl directors, sure, it would hurt them. For the dying little girls and boys who the bowls falsely claimed to be feeding through the money they give to charity...it would be the best thing they could hope for outside of a tree that grows money. Bowl directors are highly corrupt, as Death to the BCS explains expertly.

    Regular season: This has to be the funniest one of all. The "regular season IS the playoff" argument has more holes than a defense full of tackling dummies. What kind of playoff rewards an undefeated team with a No. 3 final ranking and a warm handshake from a BCS bowl director (Utah 2004, 2008, Auburn 2004, Boise State 2006, 2008, 2009 and many, many more) as opposed to a national championship? College football's regular season.

    All of this could be tolerated if only the BCS bigwigs could see the many examples of injustice their system have caused. Many people and businesses try things on a trial-and-error basis. They know when they try something that it could fail, and they are willing to pull the plug on something that is clearly not working out.

    The BCS is not perfect, as we all know. In fact, it's so far from perfect that even the BCS agrees. Yes, the Associated Press reported the BCS officials have officially announced that the official system used to officially crown a champion is officially garbage (from Fox Sports Houston).

    Great! So we're almost there!

    Now all the "cartel" (another Death to the BCS reference) needs to do is pull the plug. And that, my friends, is the point where we run into trouble. The BCS knows their system is flawed, and yet it's been in place for a decade-and-a-half. There has been time to generate enough proof that this trial-and-error experiment has been a failure, yet the BCS does nothing to change it.

    It's been 15 years since the BCS was installed, and now, finally, there appears to be a change on the horizon. So why am I here writing this article? Because the change that's coming simply isn't good enough. All that's being proposed is a four-team playoff. How the four teams are picked and where the games will be played are the only real points of discussion among the cartel members.

    There's only one problem. Four teams isn't good enough. It's better, but it isn't good enough. It's like dropping an ice cube into an empty pool. It's a step in the direction of refilling the pool, but will it come close to accomplishing that? No, it won't.

    With four teams competing for a championship, you're still going to have the same problems you tried to eliminate with two.

    Look at the 2009 season.

    You had Alabama, Texas, Cincinnati, TCU and Boise State all finish unbeaten. A four-team playoff still shuts one of them out. Forget the fact that 12-1 Florida dismantled Cincy in the Sugar Bowl, meaning the Gators would be more worthy of a playoff bid than the Bearcats. That just makes it more complicated. But it also serves as a reminder that certain conferences are stronger than others, meaning that's something to take into account when choosing the teams for a playoff that's still going to generate as much controversy as the BCS ever did.

    Even in 2008, with only one unbeaten, there would have been controversy when it came to picking the teams. Why? Because there were five powerful one-loss teams along with unbeaten Utah: Florida, Alabama, Texas, Oklahoma and Texas Tech. Never mind that Utah got shut out of the title game completely and probably would have been shunned from this four-team playoff, too. The point is, it's simply wrong to end a season with people who don't play or coach or even have a hand in the game deciding who is better, when the players could.

    So forget four teams. Each of my playoff systems have one common goal: to put enough teams in the postseason that there are no legitimate arguments for the teams that just missed. For example, the "bubble teams" would be two- or three-loss teams from power conferences or lower-conference, one-loss teams, as opposed to unbeaten teams or one-loss, power-conference teams.

    In each proposal, I will pick the teams from the 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2009 seasons (five of the most controversial), and put them in the playoff to show what the matchups would have been. I will have all the high seeds win, just to show what the later-round matchups would have been.

    Before we begin, let me quickly explain what my playoff proposals will accomplish, aside from including every deserving team and fulfilling the cartel's silly arguments: excitement.

    That's it, in a nutshell, my playoff matchups will provide more excitement than one could ever get with a four-team playoff.

    So, let's count 'em down, from five to one, with one being the boldest.

    For each proposal, there will be three sections: the logistics, which explains the proposal; the playoff/academic schedule (to prove that student athletes can indeed juggle both responsibilities); and the examples, which cover the playoff teams/game sites/matchups from each round from each of the five aforementioned seasons.

    Each playoff field would be picked by a committee. In some cases, they would be taking the bowls into account and rewarding bowl wins since they're the freshest games in their minds. In other cases, the field would be picked before the bowls.

    The teams would be seeded in the order the committee believes is best. If that means that two teams that just played in a bowl game would play again in the first round, or if two teams that played in the regular season would play for the championship, so be it. This happens in pro football, college basketball and every other big tournament. 

    Let's go! 

5. "8-Team Wild Card"

1 of 6

    The Logistics

    The eight-team wild card is perhaps the simplest playoff I have to offer. All it means is the committee picks the best eight teams, regardless of if they won their conference or what their record is.

    They just pick the best eight teams, and 1 plays 8, 2 plays 7, 3 plays 6 and 4 plays 5 on the better seed's home field. Winners play the semis at the better seed's campus, and the final is on a rotating neutral field—the four present BCS bowls plus the Cotton Bowl, once the greatest game in the country before the BCS killed it. Time to restore it to greatness.

    That's the entire plan (remember, the teams are picked prior to the bowl games). Simple, right? 

     

    The Schedule

    The regular season starts and ends as usual; the last week of regular season games would be the first Saturday of December. The playoffs would start the weekend before Christmas, the semis are the weekend before New Year's and the championship would be the third Saturday in January (for injury reasons).

    Every playoff team has three weeks at least to take their finals, and usually more.

     

    The Examples

    2001 Season

    1. Miami (11-0)

    2. Colorado (10-2)

    3. Oregon (10-1)

    4. Florida (9-2)

    5. Nebraska (11-1)

    6. Texas (10-2)

    7. Maryland (10-1)

    8. Oklahoma (10-2)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Oklahoma at Miami, Maryland at Colorado, Texas at Oregon, Nebraska at Florida

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Florida at Miami, Oregon at Colorado

    Championship Game at Rose Bowl: Miami vs. Colorado

     

    2004 Season

    1. USC (12-0)

    2. Oklahoma (12-0)

    3. Auburn (12-0)

    4. California (10-1)

    5. Utah (11-0)

    6. Texas (10-1)

    7. Georgia (9-2)

    8. Boise State (11-0)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Boise State at USC, Georgia at Oklahoma, Texas at Auburn, Utah at California

    Semifinal Round Matchups: California at USC, Auburn at Oklahoma

    Championship Game at Orange Bowl: USC vs. Oklahoma

     

    2006 Season

    1. Ohio State (12-0)

    2. Florida (12-1)

    3. Michigan (11-1)

    4. LSU (10-2)

    5. Wisconsin (11-1)

    6. Oklahoma (11-2)

    7. Boise State (12-0)

    8. Louisville (11-1)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Louisville at Ohio State, Boise State at Florida, Oklahoma at Michigan, Wisconsin at LSU

    Semifinal Round Matchups: LSU at Ohio State, Michigan at Florida

    Championship Game at Fiesta Bowl: Florida vs. Ohio State

     

    2008 Season

    1. Florida (12-1)

    2. Oklahoma (12-1)

    3. Texas (11-1)

    4. Alabama (12-1)

    5. Utah (12-0)

    6. Boise State (12-0)

    7. Texas Tech (11-1)

    8. USC (11-1)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: USC at Florida, Texas Tech at Oklahoma, Boise State at Texas, Utah at Alabama

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Alabama at Florida, Texas at Oklahoma

    Championship Game at Orange Bowl: Florida vs. Oklahoma

     

    2009 Season

    1.Alabama (13-0)

    2. Texas (13-0)

    3. TCU (12-0)

    4. Florida (12-1)

    5. Boise State (13-0)

    6. Cincinnati (12-0)

    7. Georgia Tech (11-2)

    8. Oregon (10-2)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Oregon at Alabama, Georgia Tech at Texas, Cincinnati at TCU, Boise State at Florida

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Florida at Alabama, TCU at Texas

    Championship Game at Rose Bowl: Alabama vs. Texas

4. "Plus-Seven"

2 of 6

    The Logistics

    If you're reading this article, I assume you're a pretty big college football fan, and if you're a pretty big college football fan, I assume you know who Vince Dooley is.

    In short, he's a Georgia man, and one of the first to propose a playoff. I'm sure all of you have gotten familiar with the term plus-one—play the bowl games, then select the top two teams for a championship game, adding only one extra game. Well, Dooley proposed a plus-three—same idea, but with four teams.

    Needless to say, it didn't work. 

    It was a good try, though, and since I am the furthest thing from conservative, I say kick it up a notch—make it a plus-seven, which means to play the bowl games and then pick the best eight teams and have them play at home sites, until the championship. This is essentially the same as the eight-team, wild-card playoff, except for playing the bowl games first.

     

    The Schedule

    The regular season starts and ends as usual, with the last round of games on the first Saturday of December. The bowl games would start at the same time they usually do (two weeks afterwards), with the really good bowls (games that have actual playoff contenders) being played later than they are now. The playoffs would start the weekend before New Year's, the second round would be the first weekend of January and the championship would be two weeks later (for injury reasons).

    Absolute worst-case scenario: A team that originally was thought to have no shot at the playoff, plays in the Potato Bowl the third week of December after winning the MAC Championship and, out of nowhere, is voted into the playoff. We'll call this team the 2011 Ohio Bobcats.

    Say the Bobcats make it (virtually impossible)—they still have two weeks to study for finals, just like they did last year under the current BCS. Sure, they have to cram, but this is no worse than it originally was. Or the players could just wait until after the bowl game to take their finals. Their call.

     

    The Examples

    2001 Season

    1. Miami (12-0)

    2. Oregon (11-1)

    3. Tennessee (11-2)

    4. Florida (10-2)

    5. Colorado (10-3)

    6. Texas (11-2)

    7. Nebraska (11-2)

    8. LSU (10-3)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: LSU at Miami, Nebraska at Oregon, Texas at Tennessee, Colorado at Florida

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Tennessee at Oregon, Florida at Miami

    Championship Game at Rose Bowl: Oregon vs. Miami

     

    2004 Season

    1. USC (13-0)

    2. Auburn (13-0)

    3. Utah (13-0)

    4. Oklahoma (12-1)

    5. Texas (11-1)

    6. Georgia (10-2)

    7. Iowa (10-2)

    8. California (10-2)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: California at USC, Iowa at Auburn, Georgia at Utah, Texas at Oklahoma

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Oklahoma at USC, Utah at Auburn

    Championship Game at Orange Bowl: Auburn vs. USC

     

    2006 Season

    1. Florida (13-1)

    2. Ohio State (12-1)

    3. LSU (11-2)

    4. Boise State (13-0)

    5. USC (11-2)

    6. Wisconsin (12-1)

    7. Auburn (11-2)

    8. Michigan (11-2)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Michigan at Florida, Auburn at Ohio State, Wisconsin at LSU, USC at Boise State

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Boise State at Florida, LSU at Ohio State

    Championship Game at Fiesta Bowl: Florida vs. Ohio State

     

    2008 Season

    1. Florida (13-1)

    2. Texas (12-1)

    3. Utah (13-0)

    4. Oklahoma (12-2)

    5. USC (12-1)

    6. Alabama (12-2)

    7. Texas Tech (11-2)

    8. TCU (11-2)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: TCU at Florida, Texas Tech at Texas, Alabama at Utah, Oklahoma at USC

    Semifinal Matchups: Utah at Florida, USC at Texas

    Championship Game at Orange Bowl: Texas at Florida

     

    2009 Season

    1. Alabama (14-0)

    2. Texas (13-1)

    3. Florida (13-1)

    4. Boise State (14-0)

    5. TCU (12-1)

    6. Ohio State (11-2)

    7. Iowa (11-2)

    8. Cincinnati (12-1)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Cincinnati at Alabama, Iowa at Texas, Ohio State at Florida, TCU at Boise State

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Boise State at Alabama, Florida at Texas

    Championship Game at Rose Bowl: Alabama vs. Texas

3. "X-Number Playoff"

3 of 6

    The Logistics

    The other four proposals I put out there are all highly realistic. This one is too, but it's by far the wildest one yet.

    The committee would get together and decide how many teams truly deserve to compete for the championship. They would look at all the teams and, just like for the Heisman Trophy, get to decide the cutoff point between the last true elite team and the first good, not great, team. However many teams that turns out to be (anywhere between five and eight) would play in a normal playoff, depending on what the cutoff point is.

    The purpose of this is to eliminate horrible games that nobody would watch, such as Louisville vs. Ohio State in 2006. Whether or not it would actually be a good game is up for discussion. The point is, few people aside from Louisville and OSU fans would watch it. It's bad for the excitement level I talked about, and games like this are a waste of money for the TV stations who pay to air the games.

    The higher seeds get byes—if there are five teams, the top three get byes; if there are six teams, the top two get byes; and with seven teams, the top team gets a bye.

     

    The Schedule

    Exactly the same as the eight-team, wild-card playoff.

     

    The Examples

    2001 Season (six teams)

    1. Miami (11-0)

    2. Colorado (10-2)

    3. Oregon (10-1)

    4. Florida (9-2)

    5. Nebraska (11-1)

    6. Texas (10-2)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Texas at Oregon, Nebraska at Florida

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Florida at Miami, Oregon at Colorado

    Championship Game at Rose Bowl: Miami vs. Colorado

     

    2004 Season (eight teams)

    1. USC (12-0)

    2. Oklahoma (12-0)

    3. Auburn (12-0)

    4. California (10-1)

    5. Utah (11-0)

    6. Texas (10-1)

    7. Georgia (9-2)

    8. Boise State (11-0)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Boise State at USC, Georgia at Oklahoma, Texas at Auburn, Utah at California

    Semifinal Round Matchups: California at USC, Auburn at Oklahoma

    Championship Game at Orange Bowl: USC vs. Oklahoma

     

    2006 Season (seven teams)

    1. Ohio State (12-0)

    2. Florida (12-1)

    3. Michigan (11-1)

    4. LSU (10-2)

    5. Wisconsin (11-1)

    6. Oklahoma (11-2)

    7. Boise State (12-0)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Boise State at Florida, Oklahoma at Michigan, Wisconsin at LSU

    Semifinal Round Matchups: LSU at Ohio State, Michigan at Florida

    Championship Game at Fiesta Bowl: Florida vs. Ohio State

     

    2008 Season (eight teams)

    1. Florida (12-1)

    2. Oklahoma (12-1)

    3. Texas (11-1)

    4. Alabama (12-1)

    5. Utah (12-0)

    6. Boise State (12-0)

    7. Texas Tech (11-1)

    8. USC (11-1)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: USC at Florida, Texas Tech at Oklahoma, Boise State at Texas, Utah at Alabama

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Alabama at Florida, Texas at Oklahoma

    Championship Game at Orange Bowl: Florida vs. Oklahoma

     

    2009 Season (six teams)

    1. Alabama (13-0)

    2. Texas (13-0)

    3. TCU (12-0)

    4. Florida (12-1)

    5. Boise State (13-0)

    6. Cincinnati (12-0)

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Cincinnati at TCU, Boise State at Florida

    Semifinal Round Matchups: Florida at Alabama, TCU at Texas

    Championship Game at Rose Bowl: Alabama vs. Texas

2. "16-Team Wild Card"

4 of 6

    The Logistics

    This one isn't so bold—in fact, if you care enough about a playoff to read this article, you probably have heard of this before...except for one thing.

    Sixteen teams—1 plays 16, 2 plays 15, 3 plays 14 and so on.

    The part you probably haven't seen pitched yet is the proposed creation of a final four. The first two rounds word be at home sites, but the semis and finals would be in one of the rotating BCS bowls; just like the Final Four in basketball.

    With 16 teams, auto bids would be given out to the champions of the best six conferences. The aforementioned committee would rank the conferences in order of strength. The champions of those top six conferences must be included in the playoff, but not necessarily in any particular order.

     

    The Schedule

    The schedule would be the same as the eight-team wild card, except there would be two weeks between the second round and the semifinals, as well as two weeks between the semis and the championship.

     

    The Examples

    2001 Season

    1. Miami (11-0)

    2. Colorado (10-2)

    3. Oregon (10-1)

    4. Florida (9-2)

    5. Nebraska (11-1)

    6. Texas (10-2)

    7. Maryland (10-1)

    8. Oklahoma (10-2)

    9. Tennessee (10-2)

    10. Illinois (10-1)

    11. Stanford (9-2)

    12. Washington State (9-2)

    13. LSU (9-3)

    14. BYU (12-1)

    15. Syracuse (8-3)

    16. Fresno State (11-2)

    Round 16 Matchups: Fresno State at Miami, Syracuse at Colorado, BYU at Oregon, LSU at Florida, Washington State at Nebraska, Stanford at Texas, Illinois at Maryland, Tennessee at Oklahoma

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Oklahoma at Miami, Maryland at Colorado, Texas at Oregon, Nebraska at Florida

    Semifinal Round Matchups at Rose Bowl: Florida vs. Miami, Oregon vs. Colorado

    Championship Game at Rose Bowl: Miami vs. Colorado

     

    2004 Season

    1. USC (12-0)

    2. Oklahoma (12-0)

    3. Auburn (12-0)

    4. California (10-1)

    5. Utah (11-0)

    6. Texas (10-1)

    7. Georgia (9-2)

    8. Boise State (11-0)

    9. Louisville (10-1)

    10. Virginia Tech (10-2)

    11. Iowa (9-2)

    12. LSU (9-2)

    13. Michigan (9-2)

    14. Tennessee (9-3)

    15. Miami (8-3)

    16. Florida (7-4)

    Round 16 Matchups: Florida at USC, Miami at Oklahoma, Tennessee at Auburn, Michigan at California, LSU at Utah, Iowa at Texas, Virginia Tech at Georgia, Louisville at Boise State

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Boise State at USC, Georgia at Oklahoma, Texas at Auburn, Utah at California

    Semifinal Round Matchups at Orange Bowl: California vs. USC, Auburn vs. Oklahoma

    Championship Game at Orange Bowl: USC vs. Oklahoma

     

    2006 Season

    1. Ohio State (12-0)

    2. Florida (12-1)

    3. Michigan (11-1)

    4. LSU (10-2)

    5. Wisconsin (11-1)

    6. Oklahoma (11-2)

    7. Boise State (12-0)

    8. Louisville (11-1)

    9. Arkansas (10-3)

    10. Auburn (10-2)

    11. Notre Dame (10-2)

    12. Virginia Tech (10-2)

    13. Wake Forest (11-2)

    14. Tennessee (9-3)

    15. Rutgers (10-2)

    16. Texas (9-3)

    Round 16 Matchups: Tennessee at Ohio State, Rutgers at Florida, Texas at Michigan, Wake Forest at LSU, Virginia Tech at Wisconsin, Notre Dame at Oklahoma, Auburn at Boise State, Arkansas at Louisville

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Louisville at Ohio State, Boise State at Florida, Oklahoma at Michigan, Wisconsin at LSU

    Semifinal Round Matchups at Fiesta Bowl: LSU vs. Ohio State, Michigan vs. Florida

    Championship Game at Fiesta Bowl: Florida vs. Ohio State

     

    2008 Season

    1. Florida (12-1)

    2. Oklahoma (12-1)

    3. Texas (11-1)

    4. Alabama (12-1)

    5. Utah (12-0)

    6. Boise State (12-0)

    7. Texas Tech (11-1)

    8. USC (11-1)

    9. TCU (10-2)

    10. Ohio State (10-2)

    11. Oklahoma State (9-3)

    12. Cincinnati (11-2)

    13. Georgia (9-3)

    14. Oregon (9-3)

    15. Mississippi (8-4)

    16. Pittsburgh (9-3)

    Round 16 Matchups: Pittsburgh at Florida, Mississippi at Oklahoma, Oregon at Texas, Georgia at Alabama, Cincinnati at Utah, Oklahoma State at Boise State, Ohio State at Texas Tech, TCU at USC

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: USC at Florida, Texas Tech at Oklahoma, Boise State at Texas, Utah at Alabama

    Semifinal Round Matchups at Orange Bowl: Alabama vs. Florida, Texas vs. Oklahoma

    Championship Game at Orange Bowl: Florida vs. Oklahoma

     

    2009 Season

    1. Alabama (13-0)

    2. Texas (13-0)

    3. TCU (12-0)

    4. Florida (12-1)

    5. Boise State (13-0)

    6. Cincinnati (12-0)

    7. Georgia Tech (11-2)

    8. Oregon (10-2)

    9. Iowa (10-2)

    10. Penn State (10-2)

    11. Virginia Tech (9-3)

    12. LSU (9-3)

    13. Miami (9-3)

    14. Oregon State (8-4)

    15. West Virginia (9-3)

    16. Nebraska (9-4)

    Round 16 Matchups: Nebraska at Alabama, West Virginia at Texas, Oregon State at TCU, Miami at Florida, LSU at Boise State, Virginia Tech at Cincinnati, Penn State at Georgia Tech, Iowa at Oregon 

    Quarterfinal Round Matchups: Oregon at Alabama, Georgia Tech at Texas, Cincinnati at TCU, Boise State at Florida

    Semifinal Round Matchups at Rose Bowl: Florida vs. Alabama, TCU vs.Texas

    Championship Game at Rose Bowl: Alabama vs. Texas

1. "25-Team Ultimate Playoff"

5 of 6

    And so we come to the final playoff proposal I have to offer; by far the wildest and boldest one of all. Instead of following the procedure I laid out for the previous four proposals, I simply attached the link to an earlier article that completely covers everything about the plan, from the dates to the TV schedules to selection procedure.

    I even did something pretty cool with the bowl games.

    It's a long, thought-out procedure that takes down the BCS another peg while it's at it.

    You can read all about it here.

    You can view the bracket here.

    The example is from the 2011 season, a topic that I'm sure Oklahoma State fans are interested in reading about.

    This would be a dream come true for college football fans. Enjoy it...

Overview

6 of 6

    Look, I'm the first to admit. No plan is perfect.

    But alongside all the prerequisites for a playoff to work—academics, money and keeping the regular season relevant—the main purpose of these plans, particularly the last one, is to generate excitement. Of course, not every higher seed is going to win every game, it's just meant to show you guys what later-round matchups could look like.

    Rematches from the regular season, or even conference championship matchups in the playoffs, would happen frequently, yet both NFL New York teams have proven that a team could take a slaughtering and then go right back into their enemy's home and reverse the outcome, like they each did a few short years ago.

    Who's to say Texas Tech wouldn't have done that in 2008 to Oklahoma? Or LSU to Florida in 2001? That the Florida-Alabama wars in the 2008 and 2009 playoffs wouldn't have come out differently than the SEC Championships a few weeks earlier? How do we know for sure that Ohio State would have beaten Texas a second time in 2006, or that Auburn would have beaten Tennessee again in 2004? 

    You see?

    Nothing is impossible. No one outcome proves anything, as the Jets showed us against the Patriots in 2010 (they lost 45-3 in the regular season, then won 28-21 in the playoffs in Gillette Stadium), and the Giants showed us against the Packers in 2007 (they lost 35-13 in the regular season and won 23-20 in the playoffs in Lambeau).

    That's the beauty of a playoff. Anything can happen.

    So, the time has come for the teams and players to decide who is best. They must relieve the ill-informed voters of that duty. (How ill-informed? According to Death To The BCS, three voters were called after the end of the 2008 season to voice their opinions of unbeaten Utah. None watched a single live minute of Utah football all season.)

    The time has come to implement a playoff. Not this four-team nonsense, but a real playoff.