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The 25 Greatest NBA Finals Performances of the Last 25 Years

Kelly ScalettaFeatured Columnist IVJanuary 9, 2017

The 25 Greatest NBA Finals Performances of the Last 25 Years

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    The NBA Finals is one of the biggest stages in all of the four major sports. It's where the truly great are separated from the truly good. 

    It's where we see players grow. It's the difference between '06 Dirk Nowitzki and '12 Dirk Nowitzki. It's the difference between "Tragic Johnson" and "Magic Johnson." 

    It's where LeBron James has yet to succeed and where Dwyane Wade has had some of the NBA's greatest performances. 

    When we look at the truly great players, we look to the Finals.

    I wanted to objectively see how players fared over the last 25 years, so l loaded up all the data into my trusty spreadsheet, put in the formula for John Hollinger's Game Score and ran the results. 

    Here are the 25 best game scores over an entire NBA Finals listed in order. I recognize that there are other factors to consider, but for the purpose of this article, it's a starting point for the conversation below. 

25. Kobe Bryant, 2002

2 of 27

    PTS/G: 26.8

    TRB/G: 5.8

    AST/G: 5.3

    Game Score: 20.28

    Kobe Bryant starts off our list with his 2002 performance in which he combined with Shaquille O’Neal (whose rank will be revealed later) for the best performance by a pair of teammates in an NBA Finals over the last 25 years.

    This would mark the last championship they won together, as the following year the town, so to speak, wasn’t big enough for the both of them anymore.

    This performance was one of 12 times in the last 25 years that a player averaged 25 points, five rebounds and five assists over the course of a Finals. This was also the most efficient Finals of Bryant’s career, as he amassed a true shooting percentage of .623.    

24. Anfernee "Penny" Hardaway

3 of 27

    PTS/G: 25.5

    TRB/G: 4.8

    AST/G: 8.0

    Game Score: 20.45

    Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal combined for the best performance by a duo in the NBA Finals in the last 25 years. O’Neal also combined with Anfernee Hardaway for the best performance by a pair of losing teammates in the last 25 years.

    The Magic were swept in the Finals by the Houston Rockets, but it wasn’t the fault of their stars. Hardaway averaged 25.5 points and 8.0 assists per game. Sadly, Hardaway had about one more good year after this season. After that, a series of injuries, including a devastating knee injury which precipitated the first of five surgeries, would end his status as an elite NBA player. 

23. Allen Iverson, 2001

4 of 27

    PTS/G: 35.6

    TRB/G: 5.6

    AST/G: 3.8

    Game Score: 20.48

    Iverson’s 2001 series was huge—just not huge enough. Mostly, he was an absolute scoring machine. His 35.6 points is the fifth-highest scoring average in the last 25 years.

    There are those who are going to point out that he was miserable from the field, and I’m not going to dispute that. He was just .407 for the series. The shots he missed don't take away from the shots he made, though. He sacrificed his body over and over again for the sake of his team. It’s really not his fault that he had no other offensive talents on his team. It’s also not his fault that Shaquille O’Neal was on the other team. 

22. Hakeem Olajuwon, 1994

5 of 27

    PTS/G: 26.9

    TRB/G: 9.1

    AST/G: 3.6

    Game Score: 21.00

    In 1994, Hakeem Olajuwon had arguably one of the greatest postseasons in history, and that was consummated in the Finals. Overall, he scored 664 points, grabbed 254 rebounds and passed for 98 assists in the postseason.

    This was one of the biggest same-position matchups in the game’s history, as Olajuwon was paired against the New York Knicks' Patirck Ewing. Olajuwon won the showdown, holding Ewing to 18.9 points. However, Ewing made it a competition, as he out-rebounded Olajuwon 12.4 to 9.1 and set the NBA Finals record for blocks. 

T20. Clyde Drexler, 1990

6 of 27

    PTS/G: 26.4

    TRB/G: 7.8

    AST/G: 6.2

    Game Score: 21.26

    When people talk about the “Jordan Era,” they frequently say something along the lines of “all Michael Jordan had to go against was Reggie Miller and Clyde Drexler,” thereby denigrating what it meant to go against Clyde Drexler. In the history of the NBA there are three players who have 20,000 points, 6,000 assists and 6,000 rebounds. They are Drexler, Oscar Robertson and John Havlicek.

    Drexler was one of the great all-around players in the history of the game, and it is a disservice to what he accomplished to somehow wrongly use his name to suggest there was a weakness in his era. His Finals performance was just as impressive as he was one of only five players in the last 25 years to average 25 points, five boards and five assists for a Finals series.

    The others were Michael Jordan (who did it three times), Dwyane Wade, Magic Johnson and Charles Barkley. That’s pretty elite company and evidence that Drexler is an elite player. And oh yeah, Drexler did it while he was being guarded by Michael Jordan.

T20. Chauncey Billups, 2004

7 of 27

    PTS/G: 21.0

    TRB/G: 2.7

    AST/G: 4.3

    Game Score: 20.37

    This is where Chauncey “Big Shot” Billups became known as "Big Shot." His overall numbers aren’t quite as big as those of some of the players who are below him, but his game score is higher because of his incredibly efficient shooting. He shot .509 from the field, .471 from three and .929 from the stripe.

    His true shooting percentage for the series was an utterly insane .921. That’s the best true shooting percentage of any player in the Finals over the last 25 years. The next best percentage by a player who scored at least 20 points per game is Ray Allen, who shot .708 in 2008. 

19. Michael Jordan, 1998

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    19. Michael Jordan, 1998

    PTS/G: 33.5

    TRB/G: 4.0

    AST/G: 2.3

    Game Score: 21.37

    Jordan’s sixth championship was relatively pedestrian by Jordan’s Finals standards.

    He scored 33.5 points per game, but he only shot .427 for the series. However, one of the great moments in his career came when he stole the ball with the Bulls down by one point and time running out on the clock. He then drove the ball down the court, crossed-over Byron Russell and sank the championship-winning shot. NBA.com calls it one of the NBA’s greatest moments and describes it this way,

    With Chicago trailing by three points in the final minute, Jordan first scored on a drive. Then he stripped the ball from Karl Malone at the defensive end. Finally, he buried the game-winning shot, a 20-footer with 5.2 seconds left, that gave the Bulls an 87-86 victory and their sixth championship in eight years.

    Jordan had overcome fatigue and finished with 45 points as he won his sixth Finals Most Valuable Player award, while reaffirming his status as the NBA's best player.

18. Shaquille O'Neal, 1995

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    PTS/G: 28.0

    TRB/G: 12.5

    AST/G: 6.3

    Game Score: 21.83

    In his first Finals appearance Shaquille O’Neal’s team didn’t fare well, but he didn’t do half bad when you consider he was going against one of the greatest centers in the history of the game in the prime of his career while O’Neal was still learning the ropes.

    His 28.0 points, 12.5 rebounds and 6.3 assists per game mark the only time in the last 25 years that a player has averaged at least 24 points, 12 boards and six assists through a Finals series.

    Interestingly, many billed this as a “failure” on O’Neal’s part. I’m not sure how 28 points with a .595 field goal percentage against a two-time Defensive Player of the Year is a “failure,” but some people don’t allow for nuance in their lives and struggle getting past anything other than wins and losses. 

17. Joe Dumars, 1989

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    PTS/G: 27.3

    TRB/G: 1.8

    AST/G: 6.0

    Game Score: 22.35

    In 1989, the Detroit Pistons avenged their 1988 Finals loss to the Los Angeles Lakers—albeit without the Lakers having Magic Johnson or James Worthy. Dumars, with his 27.3 points per game, led the Pistons to the decisive sweep.

    Probably the closest thing to a “pivotal” point in the series came in Game 3, when the Pistons won a tight game, 114-110. A Lakers win in Game 3 would have changed the complexion of the series, but Dumars took over in the third quarter, at one point scoring 17 consecutive points for the Pistons.

    Dumars shot .576 from the field for the series and .868 from the stripe. That remarkably efficient effort was enough to win him the Finals MVP. 

16. Tim Duncan, 1999

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    PTS/G: 27.4

    TRB/G: 14.0

    AST/G: 2.4

    Game Score: 22.64

    Tim Duncan is arguably the most underrated player in NBA history. Players with similar accolades are easily considered top 10 players, but Duncan is disputed as one. He, Charles Barkley and Shaquille O’Neal are the only three players to average 25 points and 12 rebounds in an NBA Finals.

    The only player to out-rebound and outscore Duncan for a series is O’Neal. His .537 shooting percentage is hardly a detriment either.

    Duncan has never won less than 50 games in his career (or the equivalent in strike-shortened seasons). He has never missed the playoffs. He has never lost a Finals. His legacy started in 1999, when the San Antonio Spurs won their first-ever title behind their Finals MVP, Duncan. 

15. Dwyane Wade, 2011

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    PTS/G: 26.5

    TRB/G: 7.0

    AST/G: 5.2

    Game Score: 22.67

    Dwyane Wade, through 10 games in the NBA Finals, has been nothing short of incredible. His 2011 Finals was pretty ordinary compared to what happened in 2006. Of course, in both NBA Finals he’s played, he was guarded by the legendary Jason Terry, too. Make of that what you will, but it just occurred to me that the same player defended him in both Finals, and he’s less of a defender than Shawn Marion.

    Regardless of who was guarding him, Dwyane Wade is one of a smattering of players on this list multiple times. The others are Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, Shaquille O’Neal and Tim Duncan. That’s some pretty elite company.

14. Kobe Bryant, 2009

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    PTS/G: 32.4

    TRB/G: 5.6

    AST/G: 7.4

    Game Score: 22.82

    2009 marks Kobe Bryant’s second appearance on this list and his best performance in an NBA Finals. He scored 32.4 points per game, in the 10th-best scoring series by any player in the last 25 seasons.

    This was a personal victory for Bryant, as well, as it was the first time he won a championship without Shaquille O’Neal on the team. It established his legacy as a player who could lead a team to a championship, ending the accusation that he was merely riding O’Neal’s coattails prior to that. 

13. Michael Jordan, 1997

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    PTS/G: 32.3

    TRB/G: 7.0

    AST/G: 6.0

    Game Score: 23.38

    This is the second appearance by Jordan on the list. His 1997 performance was not his best statistically speaking, but one of the greatest games of his career came during this series with the Utah Jazz.

    With the series tied two games apiece, Game 5 was going to be the pivotal point of the series. He was so ill the day before that his doctors told him it would be impossible for him to play. Jordan defied expectations and played one of the most heroic games in NBA history in what has come to be known as the “Flu Game.”

    He would go on to fight through the illness, and while visibly affected, he still managed to rack up 38 points, seven rebounds, five assists, three steals and a block.

    With the game finally ending, Jordan collapsed into the arms of Scottie Pippen, his long-time teammate. 

12. Charles Barkley, 1993

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    PTS/G: 27.3

    TRB/G: 13.0

    AST/G: 5.5

    Game Score: 23.43

    Those who have read my articles may be familiar with my club, VOJ, or “Victims of Jordan,” which consists of the great NBA players who are ringless due to the fact that they had the sad misfortune of playing at the same time as Michael Jordan. There is also a "Victims of Russell" club, in case you’re interested.

    Charles Barkley would be the President of the VOJ. His Finals is the greatest Finals in the last 25 years (and maybe ever) by a player on the losing side. One of his best stories comes in regards to his rivalry with Jordan. Via Kelly Dwyer of Yahoo! Sports:

    You know, I'd always thought that I was the best player, to be honest with you. I always thought, Michael Jordan when he started winning, he just had more help than me. So, when I finally came to Phoenix, I had told the late, great Cotton Fitzsimmons, 'Hey dude, I'm the best basketball player in the world. We're going to the Finals.' And he said, 'That's why I traded for you.'

    I actually thought I was the best. I thought Bird and Magic just had better players. So, I said, 'Listen dude, I'm going to the Finals this year. Dan Majerlie, Kevin Johnson... That's what I need. We're going to the Finals.' He says, 'Well Michael's gonna be there.' I said, 'Cotton, I think I'm better than Michael Jordan.' He says, 'We will see when you get there.'

    So, we actually got nervous before Game 1. We struggled. The pressure got to the guys on the team. I played decent, but then I think the other guys were nervous. So Game 2, I'm talking to my daughter.

    She said, 'Dad? Are y'all gonna win tonight?'

    I said, 'Baby, your dad is the best basketball player in the world. I'm going to dominate the game tonight.' And I remember... I think I had like 46, 47. I played great. [Ed. note: his numbers are slightly off*, but it's been 18 years]. And Michael had 52.

    And I got home that night, and my daughter was crying, and she said, 'Dad, y'all lost again.'

    I said, 'Baby, I think Michael Jordan's better than me.'

    She said, 'Dad, you've never said that before.'

    I said, 'Baby, I've never felt like that before.'

    *Editor’s note of Ed. Note: Barkley actually had 42 points, 13 boards and four assists.

    Barkley played a great series. He just wasn’t Michael Jordan, but neither is anyone other than Michael Jordan. 

11. Tim Duncan, 2003

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    PTS/G: 24.2

    TRB/G: 17.0

    AST/G: 5.3

    Game Score: 24.12

    Tim Duncan makes his second appearance on the list. His remarkable rebounding numbers are the best average rebounds per game in an NBA Finals in the last quarter century. The 24.2 points don’t hurt either.

    What makes Duncan’s performance even more remarkable is that he wasn’t scoring a lot of points in transition. This was a half-court series, with both teams—the Spurs and the New Jersey Nets—slugging it out. Duncan was often triple- or even quadruple-teamed.

    Though whatever the Nets did to him, they just could not stop him. His Game 6 is one of the greatest performances in history, as he just barely missed what would have been the only quadruple-double in Finals history. Duncan had 21 points, 20 rebounds, 10 assists and eight blocks. 

10. Magic Johnson, 1988

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    PTS/G: 21.1

    TRB/G: 5.7

    AST/G: 13.0

    Game Score: 24.37

    In the last 25 years, only two players have averaged 20 points and 10 assists through a Finals series. Magic Johnson is the only one to have done so twice, and he did so in back-to-back years. His 91 assists in 1988 were the most by a player during a Finals series in the last 25 years.

    Johnson also holds the overall record, with 94 in 1984. He also has the records for most assists in a five-game series (52) and a six-game series (84).

    Interestingly, this is the best series by a player on a winning team that didn’t win the Finals MVP. That distinction went to James Worthy, who had a huge triple-double in the decisive seventh game, notching 36 points, 16 rebounds and 10 assists. In case you’re wondering, Worthy’s performance ranks 50th on this list. 

9. Hakeem Olajuwon, 1995

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    PTS/G: 32.8

    TRB/G: 11.5

    AST/G: 5.5

    Game Score: 24.50

    Hakeem Olajuwon made his third trip to the Finals in 1995 and his first as a defending champion. He once again played an elite center, in Shaquille O’Neal, as the new guard faced the old guard. It was a battle of stars, as four of the 27 top performances of the last quarter-century came in this series.

    Clyde Drexler’s was 27th, and as presented in this slide show, Hardaway’s was 24th and O’Neal’s was 18th. Olajuwon outshone them all, though, as he scored 32.8 points per game, and added 11.5 rebounds and 5.5 assists. He also added two steals and two blocks per game.

    He is the only player to average 30 points, 10 boards and five assists for a Finals series in the last 25 years. He is also one of only three players to average at least two blocks and two steals. That he did both in the same series—and did it against O’Neal—shows what an amazing series he had. 

8. Dwyane Wade, 2006

19 of 27

    PTS/G: 34.7

    TRB/G: 7.8

    AST/G: 3.8

    Game Score: 25.38

    Dwyane Wade is the third guard paired with Shaquille O’Neal to make this list. Certainly, being paired with O’Neal has its benefits. The 2006 version, though, was a shadow of his former self, as O’Neal had a mere 13.7 points per game but did add 10.2 rebounds per game.

    Wade carved out a reputation as one of the great clutch players with this series, averaging 34.7 points per game and repeatedly carrying the Heat in the clutch to win the title. Among his most impressive performances was his 43-point Game 3, when he led Miami back from a 13-point deficit with less than six minutes left in the game.

    With the Heat losing the first two games of the series, that game—and more specifically, those six minutes—changed the complexion of the series. Over the last four games, he averaged 39.3 points and a game score of 29.9. 

7. Michael Jordan, 1992

20 of 27

    PTS/G: 35.8

    TRB/G: 4.8

    AST/G: 6.5

    Game Score: 25.83

    Michael Jordan makes his third appearance on the list with his 1992 performance. Everything was going fine for Portland until the first game started. Then things started going south, as Jordan set the record for scoring the most points in the first half of a Finals game, lighting up the Trail Blazers for 35.

    As with all of Jordan's series, it had its signature moment when, after hitting on his sixth-consecutive three-point shot, Jordan, who wasn’t a great three-point shooter, shrugged as if to say, “Even I can’t explain it.”

    His 1992 series was his second-highest scoring Finals and his most efficient. His true shooting percentage for the series was a remarkable .617, the second best for any player in the span that scored at least 30 points per game. 

6. Shaquille O’Neal, 2001

21 of 27

    PTS/G: 33.0

    TRB/G: 15.8

    AST/G: 4.8

    Game Score: 27.44

    The 2001 Lakers have the best postseason record in the history of the NBA, going 15-1 on their way to a Finals win. Shaquille O’Neal was both literally and figuratively the biggest reason why.

    His Finals performance was purely phenomenal. Despite the Lakers losing Game 1, it might have been O’Neal's best performance. He scored 44 points, grabbed 20 rebounds and added five assists. On the other hand, his 10-of-22 from the stripe wasn’t quite so impressive.

    Still his “worst game” of the series came in Game 5, when he “only” scored 29 points and had 13 rebounds. Considering the Lakers closed on the Sixers in that game, we’ll give him a pass. 

5. Magic Johnson, 1987

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    PTS/G: 26.2

    TRB/G: 8.0

    AST/G: 13.0

    Game Score: 28.30

    Magic Johnson was once considered to be a choker in the Finals himself, and that was after his huge performance in Game 7 as the starting center. He was labeled “Tragic Johnson” after some late-game and Finals meltdowns that are similar to what LeBron James has gone through in recent years.

    1987 marked the best Finals performance of his career, though, as he nearly averaged a triple-double for the series—scoring 26.2 points, averaging 13.0 assists and adding 8.0 rebounds per game. The highlight of the series came with Magic’s self-proclaimed, “junior, junior sky hook,” which he made with the Lakers down 106-105 to the Celtics and with 12 seconds left in the game.  

    NBA.com’s “60 Greatest Playoff Moments" describes it,

    After a timeout, Johnson took the inbounds pass near the left sideline. He thought about launching a jumper, but lanky Kevin McHale was in his way. So he dribbled toward the key, with McHale in pursuit and Bird and Robert Parish moving over to join him. Before they could collapse on him at the foul line, however, Johnson tossed an old-fashioned running hook shot that nestled through the net, giving the Lakers the lead.

    Bird said of the shot after the game, "You expect to lose to the Lakers on a sky-hook," noted Bird. "You don't expect it to be from Magic."

4. Michael Jordan, 1991

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    PTS/G: 31.2

    TRB/G: 6.6

    AST/G: 11.4

    Game Score: 29.36

    This is Jordan’s fourth appearance on the list. It was his first championship, and it was one for the ages, as Jordan became the third player in NBA history to win a scoring title and an NBA Title in the same year.

    He won the title by both scoring and passing the ball. He was the only player in at least the last 25 years to average double-digit assists and 30 points in the same Finals.

    The Lakers took the first game of the series, but it was the only game they would take.

    The most legendary moment of this series came on a move which held even Magic Johnson in awe. Johnson later described the layup, “He changed hands, floated about five more yards and said, 'Well, I don't know, I might need to float a little further.' Then he puts it in off glass.”

3. Michael Jordan, 1993

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    PTS/G: 41.0

    TRB/G: 8.5

    AST/G: 6.3

    Game Score: 29.63

    Many would argue that this is the best Finals performance in NBA history, and they would have a strong case. He set the scoring record, and he did so against a team that was led by Charles Barkley. His 41.0 points per game is just insane.

    In the series, he had the highest-scoring Finals ever. This included a 55-point Game 4—which was tied for the third-highest scoring game in Finals history—a 44-point Game 3, a 42-point, 12-rebound and nine-assist Game 2 and a 41-point Game 5. That makes four 40-point games in a single series.

    Only one player—Shaquille O’Neal, who has five—has that many in his career. 

2. Shaquille O'Neal, 2002

25 of 27

    PTS/G: 36.3

    TRB/G: 12.3

    AST/G: 3.8

    Game Score: 30.08

    Shaquille O’Neal’s 2002 series was remarkable, as he scored 36.3 points, grabbed 12.3 boards and added 3.8 assists per game. He had a true shooting percentage of .636 for the series.

    As mentioned in the Kobe Bryant slide (25), O'Neal and Bryant were the best tandem in NBA Finals history. The two combined for 63 points, 18 rebounds and nine assists per game, to go with 2.0 steals and 3.6 blocks. The pair combined to shoot a whopping .558 from the field and a true shooting percentage of .631.

    It’s just sad that the two couldn’t get along. 

1. Shaquille O’Neal, 2000

26 of 27

    PTS/G: 38.0

    TRB/G: 16.7

    AST/G: 2.3

    Game Score: 30.55

    Shaquille O’Neal’s run from 2000-2002 was truly extraordinary. In that span, he had three of the six best Finals over the last 25 years. Over the three-year span, he averaged 35.9 points, 15.2 rebounds and 3.5 assists per game, shooting .595 from the field on the game’s highest stage.

    Of those three years, his 2000 Finals was the best of all and arguably the greatest Finals appearance in the history of the league. It marked the only time in the last 25 years that a player had at least 100 rebounds and 200 points in a series, and he did it in only six games.

    O’Neal scored over 30 points in every game and over 40 in three of them. He also reached double digits in rebounds in every game.

    In Game 1, he had a monster 43-point, 19-rebound game.

    In Game 2, he had a monster 40-point, 24-rebound game.

    In the decisive Game 6, he had a 41-point, 12-rebound game.

    By comparison, Kobe Bryant has had only one 40-point Finals Game in his career, which came in 2009.

    Over the same three year span, he averaged 22.0 points, 6.1 rebounds and 5.1 assists per game, which rank 25th, 46th and 138th, respectively, in the last 25 years.

    Those numbers are very respectable, even brilliant as far as “Robin” numbers go, but they are decisively “Robin” numbers. It is not a slight to Kobe Bryant to say that the first three rings were more a result of Shaq than Kobe. They weren’t equally responsible, and Bryant was not more responsible.

    O’Neal had one of the greatest three-year runs in NBA history. It’s not taking anything away from Bryant to acknowledge that. To say that Bryant was just as responsible, though, would be to take something away from O’Neal. 

Players 26-100

27 of 27

    Because I always get "Where's _________?" questions on slide shows like this, here are 26-100:

    Rank

    Player

    Year

    Games

    TRB

    AST

    PTS

    Game Score

    26

    Isiah Thomas

    1989-90

    5

    5.2

    7.0

    27.6

    20.14

    27

    Clyde Drexler

    1994-95

    4

    9.5

    6.8

    21.5

    20.05

    28

    Magic Johnson

    1990-91

    5

    8.0

    12.4

    18.6

    20.04

    29

    Larry Bird

    1986-87

    6

    10.0

    5.5

    24.2

    19.58

    30

    Dennis Johnson

    1986-87

    6

    4.3

    9.3

    21.0

    19.05

    31

    Robert Horry

    1994-95

    4

    10.0

    3.8

    17.8

    19.03

    32

    Jason Kidd

    2001-02

    4

    7.3

    9.8

    20.8

    19.03

    33

    Shawn Kemp

    1995-96

    6

    10.0

    2.2

    23.3

    18.87

    34

    Kobe Bryant

    2009-10

    7

    8.0

    3.9

    28.6

    18.67

    35

    Shaquille O'Neal

    2003-04

    5

    10.8

    1.6

    26.6

    18.66

    36

    Pau Gasol

    2009-10

    7

    11.6

    3.7

    18.6

    18.59

    37

    Karl Malone

    1997-98

    6

    10.5

    3.8

    25.0

    18.53

    38

    Michael Jordan

    1995-96

    6

    5.3

    4.2

    27.3

    18.48

    39

    Clyde Drexler

    1991-92

    6

    7.8

    5.3

    24.8

    18.38

    40

    Scottie Pippen

    1991-92

    6

    8.3

    7.7

    20.8

    18.12

    41

    Reggie Miller

    1999-00

    6

    2.7

    3.7

    24.3

    17.57

    42

    Pau Gasol

    2008-09

    5

    9.2

    2.2

    18.6

    17.56

    43

    James Worthy

    1988-89

    4

    4.3

    3.5

    25.5

    17.55

    44

    Scottie Pippen

    1990-91

    5

    9.4

    6.6

    20.8

    17.54

    45

    Chauncey Billups

    2004-05

    7

    5.0

    6.3

    20.4

    17.31

    46

    Kobe Bryant

    2000-01

    5

    7.8

    5.8

    24.6

    17.18

    47

    Dan Majerle

    1992-93

    6

    8.2

    3.7

    17.2

    16.98

    48

    Karl Malone

    1996-97

    6

    10.3

    3.5

    23.8

    16.78

    49

    Ray Allen

    2007-08

    6

    5.0

    2.5

    20.3

    16.70

    50

    James Worthy

    1987-88

    7

    7.4

    4.4

    22.0

    16.56

    51

    Isiah Thomas

    1987-88

    7

    4.4

    9.0

    19.7

    16.56

    52

    Dirk Nowitzki

    2010-11

    6

    9.7

    2.0

    26.0

    16.55

    53

    Kobe Bryant

    2007-08

    6

    4.7

    5.0

    25.7

    16.37

    54

    Adrian Dantley

    1987-88

    7

    5.0

    2.3

    21.3

    16.23

    55

    Isiah Thomas

    1988-89

    4

    2.5

    7.3

    21.3

    16.20

    56

    Tony Parker

    2006-07

    4

    5.0

    3.3

    24.5

    16.18

    57

    Dirk Nowitzki

    2005-06

    6

    10.8

    2.5

    22.8

    16.15

    58

    Vlade Divac

    1990-91

    5

    8.8

    2.0

    18.2

    16.10

    59

    Kevin McHale

    1986-87

    6

    9.0

    2.0

    20.5

    16.00

    60

    Tim Duncan

    2004-05

    7

    14.1

    2.1

    20.6

    15.94

    61

    Dikembe Mutombo

    2000-01

    5

    12.2

    0.4

    16.8

    15.74

    62

    David Robinson

    1998-99

    5

    11.8

    2.4

    16.6

    15.70

    63

    Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

    1986-87

    6

    7.3

    0.8

    21.7

    15.67

    64

    Scottie Pippen

    1992-93

    6

    9.2

    7.7

    21.2

    15.63

    65

    Paul Pierce

    2007-08

    6

    4.5

    6.3

    21.8

    15.62

    66

    James Worthy

    1986-87

    6

    5.3

    4.0

    20.7

    15.60

    67

    Dwight Howard

    2008-09

    5

    15.2

    2.2

    15.4

    15.56

    68

    Latrell Sprewell

    1998-99

    5

    6.6

    2.6

    26.0

    15.44

    69

    Mario Elie

    1994-95

    4

    4.3

    3.3

    16.3

    15.38

    70

    Terry Porter

    1989-90

    5

    2.6

    8.4

    19.0

    15.34

    71

    Tim Duncan

    2006-07

    4

    11.5

    3.8

    18.3

    15.33

    72

    Scottie Pippen

    1996-97

    6

    8.3

    3.5

    20.0

    15.12

    73

    John Stockton

    1996-97

    6

    4.0

    8.8

    15.0

    14.93

    74

    Derek Harper

    1993-94

    7

    3.0

    6.0

    16.4

    14.77

    75

    Kevin Garnett

    2007-08

    6

    13.0

    3.0

    18.2

    14.62

    76

    Gary Payton

    1995-96

    6

    6.3

    7.0

    18.0

    14.43

    77

    Manu Ginobili

    2004-05

    7

    5.9

    4.0

    18.7

    14.07

    78

    Jalen Rose

    1999-00

    6

    4.5

    3.0

    23.0

    14.00

    79

    Jason Terry

    2005-06

    6

    2.2

    3.5

    22.0

    13.92

    80

    Horace Grant

    1990-91

    5

    7.8

    1.6

    14.6

    13.86

    81

    Bill Laimbeer

    1989-90

    5

    13.4

    2.4

    13.2

    13.84

    82

    Jason Kidd

    2002-03

    6

    6.2

    7.8

    19.7

    13.83

    83

    LeBron James

    2010-11

    6

    7.2

    6.8

    17.8

    13.68

    84

    Jason Terry

    2010-11

    6

    2.0

    3.2

    18.0

    13.43

    85

    Scottie Pippen

    1995-96

    6

    8.2

    5.3

    15.7

    13.40

    86

    Kenyon Martin

    2001-02

    4

    6.5

    2.5

    22.0

    13.18

    87

    Ben Wallace

    2004-05

    7

    10.3

    1.0

    10.7

    13.17

    88

    Joe Dumars

    1989-90

    5

    2.8

    5.6

    20.6

    13.00

    89

    Scottie Pippen

    1997-98

    6

    6.8

    4.8

    15.7

    13.00

    90

    Horace Grant

    1992-93

    6

    10.3

    2.3

    11.2

    12.83

    91

    Vinnie Johnson

    1988-89

    4

    3.3

    2.8

    17.0

    12.83

    92

    Austin Croshere

    1999-00

    6

    6.0

    0.8

    15.2

    12.75

    93

    Richard Dumas

    1992-93

    6

    4.3

    1.0

    15.8

    12.68

    94

    Rashard Lewis

    2008-09

    5

    7.6

    4.0

    17.4

    12.68

    95

    Robert Parish

    1986-87

    6

    6.5

    1.2

    16.7

    12.57

    96

    Terry Porter

    1991-92

    6

    4.3

    4.7

    16.2

    12.53

    97

    Byron Scott

    1987-88

    7

    4.9

    2.0

    18.9

    12.46

    98

    Pau Gasol

    2007-08

    6

    10.2

    3.3

    14.7

    12.37

    99

    Kevin Garnett

    2009-10

    7

    5.6

    3.0

    15.3

    12.33

    100

    Hedo Turkoglu

    2008-09

    5

    4.6

    3.8

    18.0

    12.30

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