Brock Lesnar and the Forgotten Era of Ruthless Aggression in WWE

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Brock Lesnar and the Forgotten Era of Ruthless Aggression in WWE
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Much in the same way as an earthquake, the arrival of Brock Lesnar created chaos and frenzy on the last episode of Monday Night Raw.

The collective anticipation of the explosive Miami crowd erupted into pandemonium as “the Next Big Thing” appeared before them.

Indeed, Lesnar has lost none of the presence that served him so well eight years ago. As he stalked restlessly around a ring occupied by John Cena, resembling a ravenous lion in the presence of a gazelle, long-time fans were transported to that time when he destroyed every wrestler in his path.

Nothing has changed. Entering the ring, Lesnar made quick work of dominating Cena, delivering the thunderous F-5 that undid legends like Kurt Angle, Edge, and even the Rock.

For those not familiar with the F-5, and Lesnar himself, let it be known that he is the product of a bygone era, a 34-year-old juggernaut who can be defined by two words:

Ruthless Aggression.

There are those that yearn for the glory days of yesteryear; a time of “Attitude,” when controversy ruled the roost and characters like Rock and Stone Cold Steve Austin took the company to unrivalled comercial heights.

Contrastingly, few yearn for “Ruthless Aggression.” But ask fans to recall that period and they will speak of it in positive terms. In a business that focuses predominantly on sports entertainment to the detriment of wrestling, “Ruthless Aggression” was the platform for the best wrestlers in the company to headline the show.

Careers flourished. Kurt Angle became the “Wrestling Machine,” and nomads like Eddie Guerrero and Chris Benoit embraced each other as world champions at the conclusion of WrestleMania XX. The future was ensured when stars such as Randy Orton and Cena were unearthed.

Even the ring yielded to the power of Lesnar.

And Brock Lesnar reigned as the biggest star of them all.

How, then, can a man younger than Cena, now the face of the current era, be the last remaining vigil of a past one?

Quite simply, Lesnar came, conquered, and left. He isn’t popular for it. A lot of bodies were left in his wake, a lot of reputations dented in the process of making him a star. Him walking out at the peak of his career, when his skill and marketability had never been higher, was controversial to say the least.

Certainly, there are those who completely mistrust Lesnar’s dedication to the business. Fairly, in truth.

He’s made no secret in the past of his dislike for the gruelling schedule and intrusiveness that comes with being a wrestler. For three years, he persevered and, frankly, was the best. But when he grew tired of the industry, he didn't hesitate in joining the NFL before embarking upon a fruitful MMA career.

There are two specific patterns involved in his career trajectory; one is disloyalty. View that how you will. The other speaks more highly of his character: competitiveness. Brock Lesnar is a born competitor.

Like him or not, that is a quality he possesses in abundance, and a quality many current WWE superstars are completely bereft of. If watching Lesnar in the ring instills such competitiveness into even wrestler working for the company, then that alone will merit Lesnar’s return.

Through him, WWE have the potential to create new stars and entertain the fans. Even if it doesn’t, the buy rate of any PPV he appears on will certainly justify his comeback in Vince McMahon’s eyes.

 

This was my comeback article! Hope you all enjoy it, and that I'm not too rusty after a three month hiatus. If you did enjoy, comment here or tell me what you think on Twitter by following @PaulMc7.

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