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The Best Player to Wear Every Jersey Number

Amber LeeSports Lists Lead WriterJanuary 21, 2017

The Best Player to Wear Every Jersey Number

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    When you consider the role of numbers in professional sports, you most likely think about the statistical trends that determine an MLB club's batting order against a certain pitcher, or the number behind the answer to a particular bit of sports trivia.

    Numbers are everywhere in sports, including in its most basic function: identifying a player on a team's roster. Outside the daily operations within a franchise, the number on a player's jersey carries little value unless that player earns it. 

    Throughout the history of the NFL, NHL, MLB and NBA, the greatest players transformed a simple number into something more symbolic, something almost magical. No. 23 isn't just any number—it's the number that belongs to the greatest basketball player in NBA history, Michael Jordan.

    Here are the greatest players ever to wear each number, from 00 to 99, in any sport.

No. 00: Robert Parish, NBA

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    Hall of Fame center Robert Parish spent most of his 21-year career in the NBA with the Boston Celtics. Parish was a nine-time All-Star and a four-time NBA Champion—his number was retired by the Celtics. 

    Others of Note
    No. 00: Jim Otto, NFL

No. 1: Oscar Robertson, NBA

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    Hall of Fame point guard Oscar Robertson spent most of his 14-year career in the NBA with the Cincinnati Royals.

    Robertson was a 12-time All-Star and won a championship in 1971 with the Milwaukee Bucks—his number is retired by both the Bucks and the Kings (formerly the Royals). 

    Others of Note
    No. 1: Ozzie Smith, MLB
    No. 1: Warren Moon, NFL 

No. 2: Moses Malone, NBA

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    Hall of Fame center Moses Malone's pro career spanned two decades, over which he played for nine different teams.

    Malone was a 12-time All-Star and won a championship with the Philadelphia 76ers in 1983—he spent the most impressive four-year stretch of his career with the 76ers.

    Malone is the seventh leading scorer in NBA history. 

    Others of Note
    No. 2: Derek Jeter, MLB
    No. 2: Brian Leetch, NHL

No. 3: Babe Ruth, MLB

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    In 1999, an ESPN poll ranked New York Yankees legendary slugger Babe Ruth as the third-greatest American athlete of the century.

    Ruth won an epic seven World Series championships with the Yanks and was selected as a member of the MLB's All-Time Team in 1997. 

    He retired in 1935 and was inducted into the Hall of Fame just one year later. 

    Others of Note
    No. 3: Allen Iverson, NBA
    No. 3: Dwyane Wade, NBA

No. 4: Bobby Orr, NHL

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    Hall of Fame defenseman Bobby Orr played the first 10 of his 12 seasons in the NHL with the Boston Bruins.

    Orr won two Stanley Cups with the B's and was awarded the James Norris trophy eight times—which goes to the NHL's top defenseman. 

    In 1999, an ESPN poll ranked Orr among the 50 greatest American athletes of the 20th century. 

    Others of Note
    No. 4: Lou Gehrig, MLB
    No. 4: Brett Favre, NFL
    No. 4: Dolph Schayes, NBA

No. 5: Joe DiMaggio, MLB

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    Hall of Fame slugger Joe DiMaggio played every season of his 13-year career for the New York Yankees and is one of the most beloved players in MLB history.

    Over his career, DiMaggio was a 13-time All-Star, nine-time World Series Champion and a three-time AL MVP.

    DiMaggio's number was retired by the Yankees.

    Others of Note
    No. 5: Nicklas Lidstrom, NHL
    No. 5: Kevin Garnett, NBA

No. 6: Bill Russell, NBA

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    Hall of Fame center Bill Russell played his entire 14-year career with the Boston Celtics.

    With the Celtics, Russell was a 12-time All-Star, won 11 NBA Championships and was a five-time MVP and rebounding champion.

    Russell's number was retired by the Celtics. 

    Others of Note
    No. 6: Julius Erving, NBA

No. 7: Mickey Mantle, MLB

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    Legendary slugger Mickey Mantle played all 18 seasons of his Hall of Fame career with the New York Yankees—he was named an All-Star every season he played.

    Mantle won seven World Series Championships with the Yanks and was named the AL MVP three times.

    Mantle's number was retired by the Yankees. 

    Others of Note
    No. 7: John Elway, NFL
    No. 5: Nate Archibald, NBA

No. 8: Teemu Selanne, NHL

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    Anaheim Ducks forward Teemu Selanne is currently in his 19th season in the NHL—almost two decades in the NHL, and he's still among the top scorers in the league. 

    Selanne's spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame is already reserved—but judging by the success he's having this season, retirement probably isn't in the immediate future of this 41-year-old star. 

    Others of Note
    No. 8: Troy Aikman, NFL
    No. 8: Alexander Ovechkin, NHL
    No. 8: Steve Young, NFL 

No. 9: Gordie Howe, NHL

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    Detroit Red Wings legend Gordie Howe's Hall of Fame career spanned part of five decades. Often referred to as "Mr. Hockey," Howe won four Stanley Cup championships with the Wings and six Hart Trophies, honoring the league's MVP. 

    Howe's other accomplishments include six Art Ross Trophies, honoring the league's leading scorer and being the first recipient of the NHL's Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008. 

    In 1998, Howe, a 12-time All-Star, was ranked third on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey players. Howe's number has been retired by the Red Wings. 

    Others of Note
    No. 9: Bob Petit, NBA
    No. 9: Drew Brees, NFL

No. 10: Walt "Clyde" Frazier, NBA

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    Hall of Fame point guard Walt "Clyde" Frazier played 10 of his 13 seasons in the NBA with the New York Knicks.

    Frazier was a seven-time All-Star who won two NBA Championships with the Knicks. 

    Frazier was named to the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, and his number has been retired by the Knicks.  

    Others of Note
    No. 10: Fran Tarkenton, NFL
    No. 10: Ron Francis, NHL

No. 11: Mark Messier, NHL

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    Mark "The Messiah" Messier played his first 11 NHL seasons with the Edmonton Oilers where he won five Stanley Cup championships.

    Messier also captained the 1994 Stanley Cup wining New York Rangers team—ending their 54-year championship drought.

    Messier is second only to Wayne Gretzky among the NHL's all-time point leaders and was inducted to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2007—his first year of eligibility. 

    Others of Note
    No. 11: Isiah Thomas, NBA

No. 12: Tom Brady, NFL

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    New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady's career isn't even over yet, but he's already considered one of the greatest players ever.

    It took Brady just two years to go from no-name sixth-round draft pick to Super Bowl MVP—making him the (then) youngest quarterback to ever win a Super Bowl. 

    Brady went on to win two more Super Bowls for the Pats before dropping two straight to the New York Giants. Whether or not he ever wins another championship, Brady's legacy is already set in stone. 

    Others of Note
    No. 12: John Stockton, NBA
    No. 12: Terry Bradshaw, NFL
    No. 12: Joe Namath, NFL 

No. 13: Wilt Chamberlain

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    After a stint with the famed Harlem Globetrotters, Hall of Fame center Wilt Chamberlain played the most productive seasons of his 13-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers.

    The 13-time All-Star won two NBA Championships with the Lakers and was named the league's MVP four times.

    Chamberlain is the only player in NBA history to score 100 points in a single game, and he is the league's fourth leading scorer of all-time. 

    Others of Note
    No. 13: Dan Marino, NFL
    No. 13: Alex Rodriguez, MLB
    No. 13: Pavel Datsyuk, NHL

No. 14: Pete Rose, MLB

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    Due to accusations that he gambled on baseball while playing for and managing the Cincinnati Reds, Pete Rose will probably never be inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame—but had circumstances been different, there's no denying his career achievements would have qualified him.

    Over a career spanning most of three decades, Rose won three World Series Championships, three NL batting titles, two Gold Glove Awards and was selected as an All-Star 17 times—to name just a few of his countless accomplishments.

    Others of Note
    No. 14: Brendan Shanahan, NHL
    No. 14: Bob Cousy, NBA

No. 15: Bart Starr, NFL

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    Packers legendary quarterback Bart Starr played his entire career in Green Bay—where he won five championships (two Super Bowls, three NFL Championships).

    Starr was selected to the Pro Bowl four times over his career and was named the MVP of Super Bowl's I and II. 

    The Packers retired Starr's number, and he was inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1977. 

No. 16: Joe Montana, NFL

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    Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana is (arguably) the best quarterback of all-time—it's tough to argue against him, considering his four Super Bowl Championships with the San Francisco 49ers.

    Montana was named the Super Bowl MVP in three of the 49ers four victories, was selected to the Pro Bowl eight times and was twice named the AP Press Male Athlete of the Year. 

    Montana may have finished his career with the Kansas City Chiefs, but it's his legendary career with the 49ers that will be remembered—his number has been retired by the franchise. 

    Others of Note
    No. 16: Brett Hull, NHL
    No. 16: Pat LaFontaine, NHL

No. 17: Dizzy Dean, MLB

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    Hall of Fame pitcher Dizzy Dean won the World Series with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1934—the same year he was selected as the NL MVP.

    A four-time All-Star, Dean's number has been retired by the Cardinals.  

    Others of Note
    No. 17: John Havlicek, NBA

No. 18: Peyton Manning, NFL

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    Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning is often referred to as the greatest regular season quarterback in NFL history—and the 11-time Pro Bowler has the stats to back up that assertion.

    Manning has been named the AFC Player of the Year six times, the AP NFL MVP four times and is the fastest player ever to reach 50,000 yards passing. 

    Manning hasn't just delivered in the regular season—he has led the Colts to two Super Bowl appearances, winning and being named the MVP of Super Bowl XLI. 

    Others of Note
    No. 18: Dave Cowens, NBA

No. 19: Steve Yzerman, NHL

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    Hall of Fame center Steve Yzerman played every season of his illustrious 22-year NHL career for the Detroit Red Wings.

    Between 1997 and 2002, Yzerman led the wings to three Stanley Cup Championships and the 10-time All Star is the sixth leading scorer in NHL history. 

    Yzerman's is just one of six numbers to be retired by the Red Wings. 

    Others of Note
    No. 19: Johnny Unitas, NFL
    No. 19: Willis Reed, NBA

No. 20: Barry Sanders, NFL

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    Detroit Lions legendary running back Barry Sanders may have never won a Super Bowl in his 10-year career in the NFL, but the 10-time Pro Bowler was rated the most elusive running back of all time by NFL.com.

    Over his career, Sanders led the NFL in rushing four times, was twice named the AP NFL Offensive Player of the Year and was named the 1997 NFL MVP. 

    Sanders is the third leading rusher in NFL history, and his number has been retired by the Lions—the only team he ever played for.  

    Others of Note
    No. 20: Ed Reed, NFL
    No. 20: Luc Robitaille, NHL

No. 21: Roberto Clemente, MLB

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    Roberto Clemente played all 18 seasons of his career with the Pittsburgh Pirates before a 1972 plane crash tragically ended the career, claiming the life of one of baseball's greatest legends. 

    Clemente was a 15-time All-Star selection, 12-time Gold Glove Award winner, four-time winner of the NL batting title and won two World Series Championships with the Pirates—being named the World Series MVP in 1971. He also captured the Babe Ruth Award in 1971. 

    Clemente was inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973, and his number has been retired by the Pirates. 

    Others of Note
    No. 21: Deion Sanders, NFL
    No. 21: Tim Duncan, NBA

No. 22: Emmit Smith, NFL

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    Hall of Fame running back Emmit Smith played all but two of his 15 seasons in the NFL with the Dallas Cowboys. The eight-time Pro Bowler won three Super Bowl Championships with the Cowboys and led the league in rushing three times. 

    Smith is the NFL's all-time leading rusher and holds the league records for the most  career rushing yards, rushing touchdowns and the most 100+ yards rushing games. 

    Smith is a member of the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor and was named the 28th-greatest player of all time by NFL.com.

    Others of Note
    No. 22: Elgin Baylor, NBA

No. 23: Michael Jordan, NBA

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    Chicago Bulls legend Michael Jordan is almost universally considered the greatest player in the history of the NBA. "His Airness" won six NBA Championships with the Bulls—being named MVP of the NBA finals for each. 

    Over his NBA career, Jordan was named an All-Star 14 times, won the NBA scoring title 10 times, was named the league's MVP five times and was selected to the NBA's All-Defensive First Team nine times. 

    M.J. is the third-leading scorer in NBA history, and his number has been retired by the Bulls. 

    Others of Note
    No. 23: LeBron James, NBA

No. 24: Willie Mays, MLB

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    Hall of Fame center fielder Willie Mays played all but one season of his legendary MLB career with the Giants—first in New York, then in San Francisco. In just his first four seasons, Mays was named the NL Rookie of the Year and won a World Series Championship—and he was just getting started. 

    Mays is tied for the most All-Star appearances with 24, he's a 12-time recipient of the Gold Glove Award, a two-time NL MVP, and he ended his career with 660 home runs—currently ranked fourth on the all-time leaders list. 

    Mays was selected to MLB's All-Time Team, and his number has been retired by the Giants. 

    Others of Note

    No. 24: Kobe Bryant, NBA
    No. 24: Jeff Gordon, NASCAR

No. 25: Barry Bonds, MLB

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    With Barry Bonds' central role in MLB's decade-long steroid scandal still fresh in our minds, it's almost impossible to predict how history will eventually place him among baseball's all-time greats. 

    Over Bonds' career, he was selected as an All-Star 14 times, was a 12-time winner of the Silver Slugger Award, an eight-time winner of the Gold Glove Award and was named the NL MVP three times. With 762 career home runs, Bonds is the all time leader—with seven more than Hank Aaron. 

    Let's just say most of those stats have a big, bold asterisk beside them. 

    Others of Note
    No. 25: Fred Biletnikoff, NFL
    No. 25: Dave Andreychuk, NHL

No. 26: Wade Boggs, MLB

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    Hall of Fame slugger Wade Boggs played most of his 18 seasons with the Boston Red Sox—although he had a short, but successful, four-season stint with the New York Yankees where he won his only World Series Championship in 1996. 

    Boggs was a 12-time All-Star selection, an eight-time recipient of the Silver Slugger Award, a two-time Gold Glove Award winner, and he won the AL batting title five times. 

    Though he played just one season with the Tampa Bay Rays, the club ultimately retired the number (12) he wore that year. 

    Others of Note
    No. 26: Rod Woodson, NFL

No. 27: Scott Niedermayer, NHL

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    Recently retired defenseman Scott Niedermayer played 18 seasons in the NHL—all but four of which were with the New Jersey Devils. 

    Niedermayer is one of the greatest defensive scorers in NHL history. He won three Stanley Cup Championships with the Devils before going on to with a fourth with the Anaheim Ducks.

    He is the only player to win every major North American and international championship in his career—the Memorial Cup, World Junior Championship, IIHF World Championship, two Olympic gold medals, four Stanley Cups and the World Cup. 

    In December 2011, the Devils retired Niedermayer's number. 

    Others of Note
    No. 27: Eddie George, NFL

No. 28: Marshall Faulk, NFL

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    Hall of Fame running back Marshall Faulk was selected to the Pro Bowl in seven of his 12 seasons in the NFL and was named the NFL Offensive Player of the Year three times.

    One year after winning Super Bowl XXXIV with the St. Louis Rams as part of the famed "Greatest Show on Turf" team, Faulk was named the AP NFL MVP. 

    Faulk was named the Rams MVP three times, and after he called it a career in 2006, his number was retired by the franchise. 

    Others of Note
    No. 28: Bert Blyleven, MLB

No. 29: Satchel Paige, MLB

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    Legendary pitcher Satchel Paige played most of his career in the Negro leagues before—at the age of 42—he became the oldest man to ever debut in the major leagues in 1948.

    Paige was twice selected as an MLB All-Star and won a World Series Championship in 1948 as a member of the Cleveland Indians. 

    Paige's baseball career spanned an epic 40 years and in 1971, he became the first Negro league player inducted into the Hall of Fame. 

    Others of Note
    No. 29: Eric Dickerson, NFL

No. 30: Martin Brodeur, NHL

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    Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur has been the starting net-minder in New Jersey since the 1991 season. In his remarkable playing career already spanning two decades, Brodeur has won three Stanley Cups, two Olympic gold medals and has established himself as one of the greatest goalies of all time. 

    In addition to the countless franchise records he holds with the Devils, Brodeur is the NHL's all-time leader in regular season wins, shutouts and games played. There's no question that, post-retirement, he will be inducted into the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. 

    Others of Note
    No. 30: Terrell Davis, NFL

No. 31: Greg Maddux, MLB

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    Pitcher Greg Maddux's career in MLB spanned 22 years, over which he played for five different teams and was named an All-Star eight times.

    In addition to being an 18-time recipient of the Gold Glove Award, Maddux was four-time winner of both the NL Cy Young Award and NL TSN Pitcher of the Year honors. 

    Maddux won the World Series in 1995 with the Atlanta Braves, and his number has been retired by both the Braves and the Chicago Cubs. He will be eligible for Hall of Fame induction in 2014. 

    Others of Note
    No. 31: Reggie Miller, NBA
    No. 31: Curtis Joseph, NHL

No. 32: Magic Johnson, NBA

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    Legendary point guard Earvin "Magic" Johnson won five championships with the Los Angeles Lakers and was named the NBA's MVP three times.

    Over Johnson's career, he was a 12-time All-Star, nine-time All-NBA First Team selection and he was named to the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team. 

    Johnson is the NBA's all-time assists leader and was inducted to the Hall of Fame in 2002. His number has been retired by the Lakers. 

    Others of Note
    No. 32: Jim Brown, NFL
    No. 32: Kevin McHale, NBA

No. 33: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, NBA

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    Hall of Fame center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar played 20 seasons in the NBA and was the league's all-time scoring leader. Kareem won six championships—one with the Milwaukee Bucks and five with the Los Angeles Lakers. 

    Kareem was a 19-time All-Star, a six-time MVP, a 10-time All-NBA First Team selection and he was named to the NBA'S 50th Anniversary All-Time Team. 

    His number has been retired by both the Bucks and the Lakers. 

    Others of Note
    No. 33: Patrick Roy, NHL
    No. 33: Larry Bird, NBA

No. 34: Shaquille O'Neal, NBA

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    Shaquille O'Neal played 19 seasons in the NBA—most notable was his eight-year stretch with the Los Angeles Lakers. Shaq won four championships with the Lakers and was named the NBA Finals MVP after three of his four wins. 

    Shaq was a 15-time All-Star and currently ranks sixth all time in points—he was recently passed by former teammate Kobe Bryant. 

    Others of Note
    No. 34: Walter Payton, NFL
    No. 34: Nolan Ryan, MLB

No. 35: Kevin Durant, NBA

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    Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant is just 23 years old, but he's already established himself as one of the greatest talents playing in the NBA today.

    In 2008, Durant was named the NBA Rookie of the Year, and the three-time All-Star has led the league in scoring twice in just five seasons. 

    Others of Note
    No. 35: Tony Esposito, NHL
    No. 35: Mike Richter, NHL

No. 36: Jerome Bettis, NFL

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    Retired running back Jerome Bettis played 13 seasons in the NFL—10 with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Bettis was selected as the AP NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year in 1993 and went on to appear in six Pro Bowls. 

    Bettis was named the Steelers team MVP three times, and it was with the Steelers that he won his first Super Bowl in 2006—he retired that offseason. 

    Others of Note
    No. 36: Robin Roberts, MLB

No. 37: Dave Stieb, MLB

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    Retired pitcher Dave Stieb played all but two seasons of his career for the Toronto Blue Jays. He was named an All-Star seven times and pitched a no-hitter on September 2, 1990. 

    Stieb is the second-winningest pitcher of the 1980s, behind only Jack Morris. 

    Others of Note
    No. 37: Doak Walker, NFL

No. 38: Curt Schilling, MLB

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    Future Hall of Fame pitcher Curt Schilling won three World Series Championships—one with the Arizona Diamondbacks, two with the Boston Red Sox—before retiring after the 2007 season. 

    Schilling, a six-time All-Star, might be best remembered for his Game 6 performance against the New York Yankees in the 2004 ALCS—the famed "bloody sock" game. 

    Others of Note
    No. 38: Pavol Demitra, NHL

No. 39: Larry Csonka, NFL

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    Hall of Fame fullback Larry Csonka won two Super Bowls with the Miami Dolphins and was a member of the famed Fins' team that went undefeated (17-0) on its way to winning Super Bow VII. 

    Over his 11-year career, Csonka was a five-time Pro Bowl selection and named the 1979 NFL Comeback Player of the Year—he retired that offseason. 

    Csonka's number has been retired by the Dolphins. 

    Others of Note
    No. 39: Dominik Hasek, NHL

No. 40: Gale Sayers, NFL

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    Running back Gale Sayers played seven seasons with the Chicago Bears—but started just four games in his last two injury-plagued seasons.

    In his short career, Sayers was a four-time Pro Bowl selection, a five-time All-Pro selection and twice led the NFL in rushing. 

    Despite his career being cut short by injuries, Sayers was inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1977—he is still the youngest inductee ever. His number has been retired by the Bears. 

    Others of Note
    No. 40: Shawn Kemp, NBA
    No. 40: Henrik Zetterberg, NHL

No. 41: Dirk Nowitzki, NBA

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    Forward Dirk Nowitzki was drafted by the Milwaukee Bucks in 1998 and then swiftly traded to the Dallas Mavericks, where he remains to this day.

    After a tough start in the NBA, Nowitzki eventually found his footing and has been selected an All-Star every year since 2002. 

    In 2011, Nowitzki solidified his legacy by leading the Mavericks to an NBA Championship—the Mavs upset the Miami Heat in six games and Nowitzki was named the NBA Finals MVP.  

    Others of Note
    No. 41: Wes Unseld, NBA

No. 42: Jackie Robinson, MLB

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    In 1947, Jackie Robinson was named the MLB Rookie of the Year. In 1949, Robinson was named the NL MVP and earned the first of six career All-Star honors. In 1995, Robinson won the World Series as a member of the Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1962, Robinson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. 

    All those achievements aside, Robinson is best known as the first black player to break the color barrier in the MLB, which had relegated black players to the Negro leagues for six decades.

    Robinson was named to Major League Baseball's All-Century Team, and his number has been retired by every team in Major League Baseball. 

    Others of Note
    No. 42: James Worthy, NBA
    No. 42: Ronnie Lott, NFL

No. 43: Richard Petty, NASCAR

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    Legendary driver Richard Petty's began his NASCAR career in 1958 and ended after the 1992 season. In the 35 years in between, he racked up 200 race wins and over 700 top-10 finishes—earning him the well deserved nickname "The King."

    Petty won both the Daytona 500 and the NASCAR Championship a record seven times and in 2010, he was a member of the inaugural class of the NASCAR Hall of Fame. 

    Others of Note
    No. 43: Troy Polamalu, NFL
    No. 43: Dennis Eckersley, MLB

No. 44: Hank Aaron, MLB

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    Hall of Fame slugger Hank Aaron is a 25-time All-Star and is second only to Barry Bonds* in all time home runs, second in all time at-bats, and third in all time games played.

    Aaron was the NL home run champion four times over his career and holds the MLB record with 17 consecutive seasons with 150 or more hits. 

    In 1957, Aaron was a member of the World Series Champion Milwaukee Braves and was named the NL MVP. His number has been retired by the Atlanta Braves and the Milwaukee Brewers. 

    Others of Note
    No. 44: Pete Maravich, NBA
    No. 44: George Gervin, NBA

No. 45: Bob Gibson, MLB

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    Hall of Fame pitcher Bob Gibson played his entire 17-year career in MLB with the St. Louis Cardinals. He was a nine-time All-Star and Gold Glove Award winner and a two-time recipient of the NL Cy Young Award. 

    Gibson won two World Series Championships with the Cardinals and was named the World Series MVP in both. He pitched a no-hitter in 1971 and was named to MLB's All-Century Team. 

    The Cardinals have retired Gibson's number.

    Others of Note
    No. 45: Kenny Easley, NFL

No. 46: Lee Smith, MLB

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    Retired pitcher Lee Smith played for eight different teams over his 18-year career in MLB. Over that time, Smith was a seven-time All-Star selection and was twice named the NL Relief Man of the Year. 

    Smith has been a candidate for induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame inn times since 2003 but each time has fallen far short of the 75 percent of votes required for election. 

    Others of Note
    No. 46: Todd Christensen, NFL

No. 47: Mel Blount, NFL

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    Hall of Fame cornerback Mel Blount won four Super Bowls as a member of the famed Pittsburgh Steelers teams of the 1970's.

    He played 13 years for the Steelers and was named to the Pro Bowl five times over his career. 

    Blount was named to the 1980's All-Decade Team and the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team. 

    Others of Note
    No. 47: Jack Morris, MLB

No. 48: Jimmie Johnson, NASCAR

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    Jimmie Johnson began his NASCAR career in 2000, and in just over a decade he's become one of the most successful race car drivers of all time.

    To date, he has 55 wins, 224 top-10 finishes and in 2009 he was named the Male Athlete of the Year by the Associated Press—the first racing driver in history to take the honor. 

    Others of Note
    No. 48: Daryl Johnston, NFL

No. 49: Ron Guidry, MLB

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    Retired pitcher Ron Guidry played his entire 14-year career for the New York Yankees. Guidry was a four-time All-Star, a five-time Gold Glove Award winner and won two World Series Championships with the Yanks. 

    Guidry's number has been retired by the Yankees. 

    Others of Note
    No. 49: Dennis Smith, NFL

No. 50: David Robinson, NBA

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    Retired center David Robinson played all 14 seasons of his NBA career for the San Antonio Spurs. The 10-time All-Star won two championships with the Spurs and was named the NBA's MVP in 1995.

    Robinson was named to the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team and is considered one of the greatest centers in league history—he was inducted into the Hall of Fame alongside the legendary Michael Jordan and John Stockton. 

    Others of Note
    No. 50: Mike Singletary, NFL

No. 51: Dick Butkus, NFL

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    Bone-crushing linebacker Dick Butkus is one of the greatest players to never with a Super Bowl.

    He played his entire nine-season career for the Chicago Bears and was selected to the Pro Bowl in all but one of those seasons. 

    Butkus was twice named the NFL Defensive Player of the Year and was inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1979. The Bears have retired his number. 

    Others of Note
    No. 51: Ichiro Suzuki, MLB

No. 52: Ray Lewis, NFL

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    Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis has already played 16 seasons in the NFL and has no immediate plans to retire.

    Lewis is a 13-time Pro Bowl selection, a three-time AFC Defensive Player of the Year selection and a two-time AP Defensive Player of the Year selection. 

    Lewis led the Ravens to victory in Super Bowl XXXV and was named the game's MVP. Even if Lewis fails to make it back to the Super Bowl, he has earned a place among the greatest linebackers of all time. 

    Others of Note
    No. 52: C.C. Sabathia, MLB

No. 53: Don Drysdale, MLB

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    Hall of Fame pitcher Don Drysdale played all 12 seasons of his career with the Dodgers—first in Brooklyn, then in Los Angeles.

    Drysdale won three World Series Championships with the Dodgers and was a nine-time All-Star. 

    In 1963, Drysdale won the Cy Young Award and was the NL TSN Pitcher of the Year. His number has been retired by the Dodgers. 

    Others of Note
    No. 53: Harry Carson, NFL

No. 54: Rich Gossage, MLB

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    Nine-time MLB All-Star pitcher Rich Gossage played 22 seasons in the league on eight different teams.

    He won a World Series as a member of the 1978 New York Yankees—the same year he was named the AL Relief Man of the Year. 

    Gossage was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2008. 

    Others of Note
    No. 54: Brian Urlacher, NFL
    No. 54: Randy White, NFL

No. 55: Larry Murphy, NHL

57 of 101

    Hall of Fame defenseman Larry Murphy played 23 seasons in the NHL before retiring as the fifth highest scoring defenseman of all time in 2001.

    Murphy was a member of four Stanley Cup winning teams during the 1990s—the only NHL player to accomplish that feat. 

    Others of Note
    No. 55: Derrick Brooks, NFL
    No. 55: Orel Hershiser, MLB

No. 56: Lawrence Taylor, NFL

58 of 101

    Legendary linebacker Lawrence Taylor played all 13 seasons of his Hall of Fame career with the New York Giants.

    A 10-time Pro Bowl selection, Taylor won two Super Bowls with the Giants and was named the AP NFL Defensive Player of the Year three times. 

    Taylor was named to the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team. He is a member of the New York Giants Ring of Honor, and the team has retired his number. 

    Others of Note
    No. 56: Sergei Zubov, NHL

No. 57: Francisco Rodriguez, MLB

59 of 101

    Relief Pitcher Francisco Rodriguez began his career with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in 2002, winning a World Series in his first season in MLB.

    Since then. the four-time All-Star has been the AL saves champion three times, the Relief Man of the Year two times, and he holds the MLB record for most saves in a season (2008). 

    Others of Note
    No. 57: Clay Matthews, NFL

No. 58: Jack Lambert, NFL

60 of 101

    Hall of Fame linebacker Jack Lambert played all 11 seasons of his career with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Lambert won four Super Bowls with the Steelers and was named to the Pro Bowl nine times. 

    He was named the 1974 NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year and the 1976 NFL Defensive Player of the Year. Lambert was named to the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team. 

    Others of Note
    No. 58: Johnathan Papelbon, MLB
    No. 58: Kris Letang, NHL

No. 59: Jack Ham, NFL

61 of 101

    Hall of fame linebacker Jack Ham played all 12 seasons of his career with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Ham won four Super Bowls with the Steelers and was named to the Pro Bowl eight times. 

    Ham was named  to the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team. 

No. 60: Otto Graham, NFL

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    Hall of Fame quarterback Otto Graham was drafted No. 4 overall by the Cleveland Browns in the 1944 NFL Draft and played his entire 10-year career there.

    Otto, a five-time Pro Bowler, led the Browns to three NFL Championships and four AAFC Championships. 

    Graham was named to the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team and the Browns have retired his No. 14, one of the two number's he wore with the franchise—the other, obviously, being No. 60. 

    Others of Note
    No. 60: Jose Theodore, NHL

No. 61: Josh Beckett, MLB

63 of 101

    Josh Beckett started his MLB career in 2001 with the Florida Marlins, spending four seasons with the club, highlighted with his performance in the 2003 World Series when he was named MVP.

    After being traded to the Boston Red Sox in 2006, Beckett has gone 84-47 as a starter, winning a World Series Championship in 2007 and voted onto the All-Star team three times.

    Others of Note
    No. 61: Bill George, NFL

No. 62: Jim Langer, NFL

64 of 101

    One of the greatest centers in NFL history, Hall of Famer Jim Langer was the cornerstone of the 1970's Miami Dolphins teams that won Super Bowls VII and VIII, including the record-setting 17-0 team.

    Over 12 seasons, Langer was a six-time Pro Bowl selection and four-time first-team All-Pro. He was named to the NFL's 1970's All Decade Team.

    Others of Note
    No. 62: Guy McIntyre, NFL

No. 63: Gene Upshaw, NFL

65 of 101

    As executive director of the NFLPA from 1983 until his death in 2009, the late Gene Upshaw helped define the modern, successful NFL era.

    Before taking on this role with the NFLPA, Upshaw has a 15-season, Hall of Fame career as a guard with the Oakland Raiders.

    The the six-time Pro Bowler and three-time first-team All-Pro player won an AFL championship and two Super Bowls over the course of the his career.

    Others of Note
    No. 63: Lee Roy Selmon, NFL
    No. 63: Willie Lanier, NFL

No. 64: Jerry Kramer, NFL

66 of 101

    Right guard Jerry Kramer spent his entire career as a Green Bay Packer, throwing one of the defining blocks in NFL history, opening a hole for Bart Starr's game-winning quarterback sneak in the 1967 NFL Championship known as the "Ice Bowl."

    In 11 seasons, the two-time Super Bowl champion was a three-time Pro Bowl selection and five-time first-team All-Pro.

    He was ranked No. 1 in the NFL Network's list of top 10 players who haven't been inducted in the Hall of Fame.

    Others of Note
    No. 64: Randall McDaniel, NFL

No. 65: Gary Zimmerman, NFL

67 of 101

    Offensive tackle Gary Zimmerman is part of an exclusive club of former USFL players—which includes Reggie White and Steve Young—who went on to be inducted into the Hall of Fame.

    The former Minnesota Viking and Denver Bronco is a seven-time Pro Bowler and five-time first team All-Pro. Zimmerman was named to the 1980's and 1990's NFL All-Decade Teams.

    Others of Note
    No. 65: Elvin Bethea, NFL

No. 66: Mario Lemieux, NHL

68 of 101

    Bobby Orr, the legendary defenseman of the Boston Bruins, once called Pittsburgh Penguins' great Mario Lemieux the most talented player he had ever seen—noting that because of the countless injuries that plagued his career, we'd never see the true potential of "Le Magnifique" realized. 

    Injuries aside, Lemieux is still considered one of the greatest players of all time and is the only person to ever win a Stanley Cup as both a player and an owner.

    Over the course of his career, Lemieux won three Hart Trophies (honoring the NHL's regular season MVP), six Art Ross Trophies (honoring the NHL's leading scorer) and two Conn Smythe Trophies (honoring the NHL's playoff MVP). He also led his native Canada to an Olympic gold medal in 2002. 

    Lemieux was inducted to the Hall of Fame immediately after his retirement in 1997, waiving the standard three-year waiting period. 

    Others of Note
    No. 66: Ray Nitschke, NFL

No. 67: Bob Kuechenberg, NFL

69 of 101

    A pillar of the Miami Dolphins offensive line that powered the team to wins in Super Bowls VII (the famous 17-0 Dolphins) and VII, Bob Kuechenberg played guard alongside Hall of Famers Jim Langer, Larry Little, and Dwight Stephenson.

    Kuechenberg was a six-time Pro Bowler and two-time first team All-Pro.

    Others of Note
    No. 67: Reggie McKenzie, NFL

No. 68: Jaromir Jagr, NHL

70 of 101

    When Jaromir Jagr was signed by the Philadelphia Flyers before the start of the 2011-12 NHL season, it marked his return to the NHL after three seasons in the KHL and the 21st year of his career.

    Jagr began his career with the Pittsburgh Penguins in 1990, winning two Stanley Cups with all-time great Mario Lemieux in 1991 and 1992. Though not always the most popular player in the locker room, the right winger is one of the best to ever play the game.

    Jagr has won five scoring titles, the Hart Trophy as MVP in 1998-99, and is a seven-time First Team All-Star. He is currently the highest-scoring European-born player in NHL history.

    Others of Note
    No. 68: Albert Pujols, MLB
    No. 68: L.C. Greenwood, NFL

No. 69: Mark Schlereth, NFL

71 of 101

    In his 12 seasons in the NFL, retired offensive guard Mark Schlereth was named to the Pro Bowl twice and won three Super Bowl championships as a starter—one with the the Washington Redskins and two with the Denver Broncos.

    The tenacious guard out of the University of Idaho played at a high level throughout his career, despite battling chronic knee problems and undergoing 29 surgeries.

    Others of Note
    No. 69: Jared Allen, NFL

No. 70: Rayfield Wright, NFL

72 of 101

    Hall of Fame offensive tackle and Cowboys Ring of Honor member, Rayfield Wright, played his entire 13-season career with the Dallas Cowboys.

    Wright played in five Super Bowls, winning two (VI and XII), as a seven-year co-captain of the team. He was considered one of the most uniquely athletic tackles of his era and his dominating style resulted in six Pro Bowl and four first-team All-Pro selections.

    The 1972 NFLPA NFC Offensive Lineman of the Year, Wright was also named to the NFL's 1970 All-Decade Team.

    Others of Note
    No. 70: Sam Huff, NFL
    No. 70: Ernie Stautner, NFL

No. 71: Evgeni Malkin, NHL

73 of 101

    Drafted second overall by the Pittsburgh Penguins in the 2004 NHL Entry Draft (after Alex Ovechkin), center Evgeni "Geno" Malkin's career was delayed by the 2005 lockout and then an international transfer dispute.

    However, it didn't take long for "Geno" to make an impact; he awarded the Calder Memorial Trophy after the 2006-2007 season as the leagues best rookie.

    Since his debut, the four-time NHL All-Star has won a Stanley Cup, an Art Ross Trophy for most regular season points, and a Conn Smythe Trophy as the MVP of the Penguins' 2009 Cup run.

    Others of Note
    No. 71: Walter Jones, NFL
    No. 71: George Connor, NFL

No. 72: Carlton Fisk, MLB

74 of 101

    When he retired in 1993, Carlton Fisk closed his 24-year career as the record-holder for most home runs by a catcher; a record that held until 2009.

    The Hall of Fame player was named the consensus American League Rookie of the Year in 1972 and over the span of his career was voted onto the All-Star team 11 times.

    A Golden Glove winner and three-time Silver Slugger Award recipient, "Pudge" famously hit the game-winning home run in the 12th inning of Game 6 in the 1975 World Series.

    Others of Note
    No. 72: Ed "Too Tall" Jones, NFL
    No. 72: Dan Dierdorf, NFL

No. 73: Larry Allen, NFL

75 of 101

    In 2008, the Dallas Cowboys signed Larry Allen to a one-day contract, allowing him to retire as a Cowboy after a tremendous 15-season pro career.

    Drafted from Sonoma State College, the offensive guard was an 11-time Pro Bowl selection and a seven-time first-team All-Pro.

    A member of the Super Bowl XXX champion Cowboys team, Allen was named to the 1990's and 2000's NFL All-Decade Teams.

    Others of Note: 
    No. 73: John Hannah, NFL

No. 74: Merlin Olsen, NFL

76 of 101

    Defensive tackle Merlin Olsen played his entire 15-year, Hall of Fame career on the Los Angeles Rams, retiring in 1976 and tied with Bruce Smith for the most number of Pro Bowl selections (14).

    A member of one of the greatest defensive lines in NFL history, the "Fearsome Foursome," Olsen was the 1962 NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year and six-time first team All-Pro. 

    Olsen was named to the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team and NFL All-Decade teams of the 1960s and 1970s. 

    Others of Note
    No. 74: Bob Lilly, NFL

No. 75: "Mean" Joe Green, NFL

77 of 101

    Hall of Fame defensive tackle "Mean Joe" Green is perhaps the most iconic member of the vaunted Pittsburgh "Steel Curtain" defense that helped lead the historic team to four Super Bowl championships in the 1970s.

    Over 13 seasons, Greene was a 10-time Pro Bowl selection, a five-time first team All-Pro and was named AP NFL Defensive Player of the Year  and NFL Defensive MVP twice.

    NFL.com rated "Mean Joe" the 13th best player in NFL history and named to the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team.

    Others of Note
    No. 75: Lomas Brown, NFL
    No. 75: Deacon Jones, NFL

No. 76: Steve Hutchinson, NFL

78 of 101

    Since being drafted 17th overall by the Seattle Seahawks, seven-time Pro Bowl offensive guard Steve Hutchinson has started in all 157 games of his 11-year career, including 48 consecutive games after being signed by the Minnesota Vikings in 2006.

    Hutchinson has been named an All-Pro seven times and is a member of the 2000's NFL All-Decade Team.

    Others of Note
    No. 76: Marion Motley, NFL

No. 77: Ray Bourque, NHL

79 of 101

    Boston Bruins and Colorado Avalanche defenseman Ray Bourque was exceptional from the moment he was drafted eighth overall in 1979. Over a career spanning two decades, he set records for most career goals, points and assists by a defenseman; milestones that remain standing in 2012.

    Bourque's other achievements include five Norris Trophies, honoring the league's best defenseman, and being named a first team NHL All-Star 13 times. 

    In 2001, his final season in the NHL, the Hall of Famer won his one and only Stanley Cup with the Colorado Avalanche. Bourque's number has been retired by both the Bruins and the Avalanche—one of only six players in history whose jersey has been retired by more than one club. 

    Others of Note
    No. 77: Paul Coffey, NHL
    No. 77: Pierre Turgeon, NHL

No. 78: Anthony Muñoz, NFL

80 of 101

    Considered one of the most dominant offensive tackle of his era, Anthony Munoz spent 13 seasons with the Cincinnati Bengals and was selected for the Pro Bowl eight consecutive seasons.

    The Hall of Fame player finished his 14-year career as an 11-time Pro Bowler and was named Bart Starr Man of the Year in 1988 and Walter Payton Man of the Year in 1991. 

    Munoz was named to the 1980's All-Decade Team and the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team. 

    Others of Note
    No. 78: Art Shell, NFL

No. 79: Rosey Brown, NFL

81 of 101

    Hall of Fame offensive lineman Rosey Brown was drafted in 1953 by the New York Giants after being named to the Pittsburgh-Courier's 1952 Black All-American Team.

    Over his career, Brown received All-NFL team honors for eight consecutive years, was a nine-time Pro Bowl selection and helped the Giants win a championship in 1956. 

    Brown was named to the 1950's All-Decade Team and the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team.

    Others of Note
    No. 79: Erik Williams, NFL

No. 80: Jerry Rice, NFL

82 of 101

    Hall of Fame wide receiver Jerry Rice is the NFL's all-time leader in career receptions, receiving yards and touchdowns.

    An integral part of the 49ers dynasty in the 1980s, the three-time Super Bowl champion was a 13-time Pro Bowler and 12-time All-Pro during his 20 season career.

    Rice was chosen as the best NFL Player of all-time by NFL.com, was named to the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, and his number has been retired by the 49ers. 

    Others of Note
    No. 80: Cris Carter, NFL
    No. 80: Kellen Winslow, NFL

No. 81: Terrell Owens, NFL

83 of 101

    Though wide receiver Terrell Owens is not going to win any popularity contests, he has been one of the most productive players in NFL history. 

    The six-time Pro Bowler and five-time All-Pro is second on the list of all-time leaders in reception yards (15,934) and touchdowns (153) behind the great Jerry Rice, and he ranks sixth in catches (1,078).

    Others of Note
    No. 81: Tim Brown, NFL

No. 82: Raymond Berry, NFL

84 of 101

    Hall of Fame wide receiver Raymond Berry was eight-time Pro Bowler and first-team All-Pro before retiring in 1967.

    His 13-season career was underscored by one of the greatest individual performances ever in an NFL title game, when he caught 12 passes for 178 yards and a touchdown in 1958.

    Others of Note
    No. 82: John Stallworth, NFL
    No. 82: Martin Straka, NHL 

No. 83: Ted Hendricks, NFL

85 of 101

    Hall of Famer and four-time Super Bowl champion linebacker Ted Hendricks blocked a mind boggling 25 field goals over his 15-season pro career.

    The eight-time Pro Bowl selection was named to the 1970's All-Decade and NFL's 75th Anniversary teams.

    Others of Note
    No. 83: Andre Reed, NFL

No. 84: Shannon Sharpe, NFL

86 of 101

    Eight-time Pro Bowl tight end Shannon Sharpe played 14 seasons in the NFL, earning All-Decade Team honors for the 1990's. Sharpe was the first tight end ever to amass over 10,000 receiving yards. 

    The three-time Super Bowl champion was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

    Others of Note
    No. 84: Chris Webber, NBA
    No. 84: Randy Moss, NFL

No. 85: Jack Youngblood, NFL

87 of 101

    Hall of Fame defensive end Jack Youngblood only missed one game during 14-year NFL career and played in 201 consecutive games for the Los Angeles Rams—a team record.

    Youngblood was named to the Pro Bowl seven times and was a five-time first-team All-Pro.

    Others of Note
    No. 85: Antonio Gates, NFL
    No. 85: Chad Ochocinco, NFL

No. 86: Hines Ward, NFL

88 of 101

    Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward reached two career milestones in the 2011-2012 NFL season when he topped 1,000 receptions and 12,000 receiving yards for his career.

    The 14-year veteran, four-time Pro Bowler and Super Bowl XL MVP is currently 18th on the list of NFL career reception yards leaders.

    Others of Note: 
    No. 86: Buck Buchanan, NFL

No. 87: Sidney Crosby, NHL

89 of 101

    By the age of 23, Pittsburgh Penguins center and team captain Sidney Crosby had already won a Stanley Cup, a scoring title, Maurice "Rocket" Richard Trophy for most goals in a season and the Hart Memorial Trophy as the NHL MVP.

    While concussions ended his 2010-11 season and threaten to do the same in 2012, the four-time All-Star has lived up to his reputation as one of the most promising hockey talents in a generation.

    Others of Note
    No. 87: Dwight Clark, NFL

No. 88: Tony Gonzalez, NFL

90 of 101

    Future Hall of Fame tight end Tony Gonzalez currently holds the NFL record  for single season and career receptions as well as career touchdowns and receiving yards for the position.

    In 2012, the 12-time Pro Bowler will be entering his 16th season in the NFL.

    Others of Note
    No. 88: Eric Lindros, NHL
    No. 88: Michael Irving, NFL 

No. 89: Alexander Mogilny, NHL

91 of 101

    Six-time NHL All-Star right winger Alexander Mogilny was a prolific scorer who had one of the best seasons in league history. Mogilny won a Stanley Cup with the New Jersey Devils in 2001 and tallying over 100 points in a season twice over his 17-year career.

    Others of Note
    No. 89: Mike Ditka 

No. 90: Julius Peppers, NFL

92 of 101

    Since being selected as the second overall pick in the 2002 NFL Draft, defensive end Julius Peppers has become one of the premier pass rushers in the NFL, reaching 100 career sacks in 2011.

    The 2002 consensus NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year and two-time All-Pro selection is a seven-time Pro Bowler.

    Others of Note
    No. 90: Neil Smith, NFL
    No. 90: Jevon Kearse, NFL

No. 91: Sergei Federov, NHL

93 of 101

    A member of the dominant, three-time Stanley Cup winning Detroit Red Wings of the 1990s, center Sergei Fedorov was named Hart Memorial Trophy winner as the most valuable player in the NHL and was also a two-time Frank J. Selke Trophy winner as the best defensive forward.

    Federov played 22 years in the NHL, retiring after the 2008-2009 season.

    Others of Note
    No. 91: Kevin Green, NFL

No. 92: Reggie White, NFL

94 of 101

    When Reggie White retired in 2000, the defensive end and 13-time Pro Bowler was the all-time NFL sacks leader with 198. 

    The two-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year was a key part of Green Bay's Super Bowl XXXI winning team and was inducted posthumously into the Hall of Fame in 2006.

    His number has been retired by the Tennessee Volunteers, Green Bay Packers and Philadelphia Eagles

    Others of Note
    No. 92: Michael Strahan, NFL

No. 93: Doug Gilmour, NHL

95 of 101

    After the aggressive forward was traded to Toronto by the Calgary Flames in 1992, Doug Gilmour switched his jersey number from 39 to 93 and posted 127 and 111 in his first two full seasons with the Maple Leafs.

    The 1992-93 Frank J. Selke Trophy winner was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

    Others of Note
    No. 93: Dwight Freeney, NFL
    No. 93: John Randle, NFL

No. 94: Charles Haley, NFL

96 of 101

    Charles Haley was on five Super Bowl championship teams, winning two with the San Francisco 49ers and three with the Dallas Cowboys.

    Over his 13-year career the defensive end was named to the Pro Bowl five times, tallying 100.5 sacks and twice garnering All-Pro honors. 

    Haley was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor in 2011.

    Others of Note
    No. 94: Dana Stubblefield, NFL
    No. 94: DeMarcus Ware, NFL 

No. 95: Richard Dent, NFL

97 of 101

    Richard Dent was a key part of Buddy Ryan's dominant Chicago Bears defense and in the 1985 season he led the NFL with 17 sacks and was named MVP of the Super Bowl XX.

    The four-time Pro Bowl defensive end recorded 137.5 sacks over 15 seasons and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

    Others of Note
    No. 95: Greg Lloyd, NFL

No. 96: Cortez Kennedy, NFL

98 of 101

    Cortez Kennedy played his entire 11-year career with the Seattle Seahawks and was the 1992 NFL Defensive Player of the Year. The seven-time Pro Bowl defensive tackle was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

    Others of Note
    No. 96: Thomas Holmstrom, NHL

No. 97: Jeremy Roenick, NHL

99 of 101

    Drafted by the Chicago Blackhawks in the first round of 1988 NHL entry draft, Jeremy Roenick had an impressive 18-season NHL career—scoring 1,216 points—and is one of only three American-born players to score 500 goals.

    The center was a nine-time NHL All-Star and was inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame after retiring in 2009.

    Others of Note
    No. 97: Simeon Rice, NFL

No. 98: Julian Peterson, NFL

100 of 101

    No. 98 isn't that popular in professional sports, but recently retired outside linebacker Julian Peterson had a very impressive 10-year career in the NFL. 

    Peterson was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in 2000. He was voted to the Pro Bowl five times and was selected as an All-Pro three times.

    Peterson recorded 756 tackles, 51.5 sacks, 21 forced fumbles and eight interceptions as a pro.

    Others of Note
    No. 98: Tony Siragusa, NFL

No. 99: Wayne Gretzky, NHL

101 of 101

    They don't call Wayne Gretzky "The Great One" for nothing. No. 99 is widely regarded as the greatest player to ever lace up skates—the records he set and the awards he captured in his 20-year NHL career speak for themselves.

     His number has been retired by all NHL clubs.

    Others of Note
    No. 99: Warren Sapp, NFL
    No. 99: George Mikan, NBA

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