WWE logoWWE

Abandoned: The History of the WCW World Tag Team Championship, Pt. 1

Kyle SchadlerChief Writer IJanuary 22, 2012

Abandoned: The History of the WCW World Tag Team Championship, Pt. 1

1 of 77

    Throughout history, professional wrestling has seen many championships.

    In WWE, there are six major titles. Not many know that the company has had a total of at least 19 different titles, 13 of which have been abandoned for one reason or another.

    The other two major companies owned by WWE are WCW and ECW, which have at least 15 abandoned and forgotten titles between them.

    For as long as it takes, I will be concentrating on those forgotten titles.

    Each slide will feature the champion, who they defeated, where and when they won it, the length of their title reign, any special circumstances that happened during their reign and a bit of commentary.

    Belts with a lengthy history will get their own articles and may be broken up into two depending on the length.

    For this edition of Abandoned, I present part one of the WCW World Tag Team Championship.

    The titles were established in 1975 for Jim Crockett Promotions as the NWA Mid-Atlantic Tag Team Championship.

    The titles appeared throughout the Mid-Atlantic territories, including Georgia Championship Wrestling and Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling.

    When MACW became WCW and began to withdraw from the NWA, the titles were renamed as such.

    WCW continued to use the NWA tag belts until the NWA created one prime Tag Team Championship using those titles.

    The titles were abandoned in 2001 after WWF bought and shut down WCW.

    Throughout its 26-year history, the titles have seen 145 champions.

    For Part 1, you’ll see the first 75 champions. So let’s get started!

The Minnesota Wrecking Crew (Gene and Ole Anderson)

2 of 77

    Defeated: Paul Jones and Tiger Conway Jr.

    Where: Raleigh, N.C.

    When: Jan. 29, 1975

    Title Reign: 106 days

    The Minnesota Wrecking Crew defeated Paul Jones & Tiger Conway Jr. to become the first National Wrestling Alliance Tag Team Champions in Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling, which was run by Jim Crockett Promotions.

    The Minnesota Wrecking Crew burst onto the scene in1966 with Gene and Lars Anderson.

    The team is best known when Gene brought in Ole in 1969, though.

    Arn Anderson would also join the team along with Ole in 1985.

    As the Wrecking Crew, they were two of the original Four Horsemen.

Wahoo McDaniel and Paul Jones

3 of 77

    Defeated: The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: May 15, 1975

    Title Reign: 27 days

    Wahoo McDaniel wrestled sparingly at first as he played professional football. He played in the AFL and NFL in the 1960s for the Houston Oilers, Denver Broncos, New York Jets and Miami Dolphins.

    After getting into a fight with police, he ended up with the San Diego Chargers but never played a single game.

    He then started wrestling full-time.

    Paul Jones got his start in the Mid-Atlantic territories of the NWA under the name Al Fredericks.

    It wasn’t long before he changed his name to Paul Jones and became a star in Jim Crockett Promotions.

The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

4 of 77

    Defeated: Wahoo McDaniel and Paul Jones

    Where: Raleigh, N.C.

    When: June 11, 1975

    Title Reign: 145 days

    Gene Anderson began his career in the early 1960s. Along with Lars Anderson, they would capture tag-team gold in the southern territories of the NWA.

    Ole Anderson got his start in the AWA in 1967, where he would capture the Midwest Heavyweight Championship.

Steve Keirn and Tiger Conway Jr.

5 of 77

    Defeated: The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

    Where: Raleigh, N.C.

    When: Nov. 3, 1975

    Title Reign: 14 days

    Steve Keirn debuted in the early 1970s and wrestled throughout the NWA and also appeared in the AWA.

    In 1991, Keirn hit it big when he was signed by the WWF.

    His gimmick was that of Skinner, an alligator hunter from the Everglades. He would also portray Doink the Clown on occasion.

    After appearing briefly for WCW, he retired in 2001.

    During the 1980s, he opened a wrestling school that has trained the likes of Mike Awesome, Goldust and Diamond Dallas Page. His training school is now WWE’s developmental territory Florida Championship Wrestling.

    Tiger Conway Jr. wrestled throughout the NWA, though mostly in the Mid-Atlantic territories.

    He was almost signed to the WWF in the mid-1990s, but the deal fell through.

    Conway retired in 1996.

The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

6 of 77

    Defeated: Steve Keirn and Tiger Conway, Jr.

    Where: Charlotte, N.C.

    When: Nov. 17, 1975

    Title Reign: 81 days

    When Ole joined Gene in the team, the two of them became one of the most successful tag-teams in the business as well as hated heels.

    They dominated the Mid-Atlantic territories until Gene retired from the ring in 1981.

Wahoo McDaniel and Rufus R. Jones

7 of 77

    Defeated: The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

    Where: Columbia, S.C.

    When: Jan. 27, 1976

    Title Reign: seven days

    During the off-season, McDaniel wrestled in the territories of the cities he played football for.

    After his career became full-time, he ended up as a contender for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship. He and champion Dory Funk Jr. sold out many arenas in Texas and their matches commonly ended in a time limit draw.

    He soon left the NWA for the AWA.

    Jones was a mainstay in the Mid-Atlantic territories but he also spent some time in the Central States territories as well.

    He has won many titles in his 18-year career before retiring in 1987.

The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

8 of 77

    Defeated: Wahoo McDaniel and Rufus R. Jones

    Where: Raleigh, N.C.

    When: Feb. 3, 1976

    Title Reign: 92 days

    After retiring from the ring, Gene became a heel manager.

    He managed such wrestlers as Ivan Koloff and Ray Stevens before retiring from managerial duties in 1984.

    After Gene retired, Ole went to GCW, another Mid-Atlantic territory, and wrestled for them as well as becoming one of their bookers.

Mr. Wrestling and Dino Bravo

9 of 77

    Defeated: The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

    Where: Raleigh, N.C.

    When: May 5, 1976

    Title Reign: 54 days

    Mr. Wrestling began his career in 1963 under the name Tim Woods.

    He was soon given the mask of Mr. Wrestling and would split his time between the two ring names.

    He would win many titles throughout the NWA before retiring in 1984. 

    Dino Bravo started out in 1970 in the NWA territories before making the move to the WWF in 1978.

    He would win the Tag Team Championship once with Dominic DeNucci as well as being the one and only WWF Canadian heavyweight champion.

    He stayed with WWF until his retirement in 1992.

    On March 10, 1993, Dino Bravo passed away after being the victim of what was said to be a drive-by shooting by the mafia.

The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

10 of 77

    Defeated: Mr. Wrestling and Dino Bravo

    Where: Greenville, S.C.

    When: June 28, 1976

    After retiring from professional wrestling for good, Gene became a deputy sheriff in North Carolina.

    After GCW was shut down by Vince McMahon, Ole helped found Championship Wrestling from Georgia.

    In 1985 CWG merged with JCP, and Ole reformed the Wrecking Crew with the newest Anderson on the scene, Arn.

Ric Flair and Greg Valentine

11 of 77

    Defeated: The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: Dec. 26, 1976

    Title Reign: 181 days

    Ric Flair is one of the biggest stars to ever step foot inside of a ring.

    With 16 World Championships, though Flair says its 21, and a plethora of other titles, Flair is probably the most decorated superstar in history.

    Getting his start in the AWA, the Nature Boy didn’t become a star until he made his way to the NWA and became a household name upon winning the World Championship on 1981 and forming the Four Horsemen four years later.

    Greg Valentine got his start in 1970 wrestling for the NWF before making the move to the NWA in 1976.

    He was brought in to replace his real-life father, Johnny Valentine, whose career was ended in the same 1975 plane crash as Ric Flair and Mr. Wrestling.

The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

12 of 77

    Defeated: Ric Flair and Greg Valentine

    Where: Charlotte, N.C.

    When: May 8, 1977

    Title Reign: N/A

    On October 31, 1991, Gene Anderson passed away from a sudden heart attack.

    The new Minnesota Wrecking Crew became founding members of the original Four Horsemen but broke up in favor of Arn teaming with Tully Blanchard.

Mr. Wrestling and Mr. Wrestling II

13 of 77

    Defeated: The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

    Where: Atlanta, Ga.

    When: 1977

    Title Reign: N/A

    Mr. Wrestling was involved in the same plane crash as Ric Flair in 1975.

    Flair would call him the “man who saved wrestling” due to him not breaking kayfabe despite being a face on a plane full of heels.

    Before retiring, he would have one final match in 1983 against Mr. Wrestling II.

    "Mr. Wrestling" Tim Woods would pass away on Nov. 30, 2002.

    Mr. Wrestling II got his start in 1956 as Johnny Walker. He retired in the early 1970s but a promoter brought him out of it in 1972 as Mr. Wrestling II.

    He became a mainstay of various NWA territories and won many titles before retiring in 1989.

    He joined Hawai’i Championship Wrestling in 2007 and came out of retirement to win tag-team gold with Mr. Wrestling 3, which was Steve Corino under a mask.

    When the company closed in 2008, Mr. Wrestling II retired once again.

The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

14 of 77

    Defeated: Mr. Wrestling and Mr. Wrestling II

    Where: Atlanta, Ga.

    When: 1977

    Title Reign: N/A

    Ole retired in 1987 after being kicked out of the Horsemen in favor of Lex Luger.

    He would return to JCP, now WCW, to reform the Four Horsemen. As their manager, the Horsemen now consisted of Ric Flair, Arn Anderson and Sting.

    Sting didn’t last long and was replaced by Barry Windham and Sid Vicious.

Dusty Rhodes and Dick Slater

15 of 77

    Defeated: The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

    Where: Atlanta, GA

    When: Sept. 23, 1977

    Title Reign: 21 days

    Dusty Rhodes became big in the NWA using the gimmick of a common man living the American dream.

    He has won so many titles, it would make your head spin.

    He found himself in WWF in 1989 under the same gimmick but was now wearing polka-dot tights.

    He would leave in 1991 and returned to JCP, which was now WCW.

    Dick Slater got his big break in GCW in 1972 where he wrestled for 11 years

    He stayed mainly in the Mid-Atlantic territories before heading to WWF in 1986.

The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

16 of 77

    Defeated: Dusty Rhodes and Dick Slater

    Where: Atlanta, Ga.

    When: Oct. 14, 1977

    Title Reign: 16 days

    Ole became a producer for WCW in 1990, then a referee in 1991.

    He was released from the company in 1993.

    He is now completely retired from the business.

Ric Flair and Greg Valentine

17 of 77

    Defeated: The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: Oct. 30, 1977

    Title Reign: ~six months

    Ric Flair and Greg Valentine were stripped of the titles in April 1978 due to the two wrestlers constantly ending their matches by disqualification.

    Flair has spent time in WCW and WWF/E, but he stayed with WCW for the majority of his career once the company was formed.

    He was with WCW until their demise in 2001 and returned to WWF the same year.

    Valentine appeared sparingly for WWWF before heading there permanently in 1984.

    Now WWF, Valentine would win Intercontinental and tag-team gold during his eight-year stay there.

Ricky Steamboat and Paul Jones

18 of 77

    Defeated: The Masked Superstar and Ken Patera

    Where: Greensboro, NC

    When: April 23, 1978

    Title Reign: 45 days

    Rick Steamboat and Paul Jones defeated The Masked Superstar and Ken Patera in a 10-team tournament final to win the titles.

    Steamboat popped up in JCP in 1977 and stayed there until 1985.

    During his eight years with the company, he would capture every title except for the World Championship.

    While as a wrestler, Jones would capture this title six times as well as the NWA United States Championship and the Television Championship.

Baron Von Raschke and Greg Valentine

19 of 77

    Defeated: Ricky Steamboat and Paul Jones

    Where: Raleigh, N.C.

    When: June 7, 1978

    Title Reign: 202 days

    Von Raschke became known for his finishing move, the Brainclaw.

    He would latch onto his opponent’s head so hard that it would draw blood. When he wrestled for the WWWF, a big red “X” would be displayed on the screen when he applied the hold due to the blood that was drawn.

    Valentine left WWF in 1992 and made his way to WCW where he won the United States Tag Team Championship.

    He left later that year and returned to WWF but left in 1994.

    He spent the next 10 years on the independent circuit before returning to WWE.

Jimmy Snuka and Paul Orndorff

20 of 77

    Defeated: Baron Von Raschke and Greg Valentine

    Where: N/A

    When: Dec. 26, 1978

    Title Reign: 123 days

    Jimmy Snuka got his start in the NWA appearing mostly in the Mid-Atlantic territories.

    He won tag-team and United States gold before heading to the WWF in 1982.

    While there, he was a heel but his in-ring ability and high flying got him over with the crowd and he quickly turned face.

    He would never win a title while with WWF but he would have many memorable matches with the likes of Bob Backlund and Don Muraco.

    Paul Orndorff got his start in the Southern states before making the move to the Mid-Atlantic territories.

    He won many titles throughout the NWA but made his way to the WWF in 1983.

    He became an immediate contender for the World Championship after Hulk Hogan won it but he himself was never able to capture it.

    He shared billing in the main event of the first WrestleMania in a losing effort with Roddy Piper against Hogan and Mr. T.

    He stayed with WWF until he retired in 1988.

Baron Von Raschke and Paul Jones

21 of 77

    Defeated: Jimmy Snuka and Paul Orndorff

    Where: N/A

    When: April 28, 1979

    Title Reign: 102 days

    Von Raschke has won many titles throughout his career and also managed the Powers of Pain for a short time in WWF in 1988.

    He would retire in 1995.

    Jones became a manager in the 1980s, creating a stable called the Paul Jones Army, which included such superstars as Rick Rude, Abdullah the Butcher, Billy Graham, Ivan Koloff and the Powers of Pain.

Ric Flair and Blackjack Mulligan

22 of 77

    Defeated: Baron Von Raschke and Paul Jones

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: Aug. 8, 1979

    Title Reign: 14 days

    Flair stayed with WWF/E until 2008 when he retired after a match with Shawn Michaels at WrestleMania XXIV.

    He made the occasional appearance for WWE until 2009 and joined TNA Wrestling a year later.

    You can still see Flair there as the manager of Gunner.

    A few weeks ago, WWE announced that the Four Horsemen would be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame. According to Flair, he’ll be there despite his contract with TNA.

    Mulligan got his start as a singles wrestler in the Mid-Atlantic territories and the WWWF as a heel.

    It got to the point where he got to feud with world champions Pedro Morales and Bruno Sammartino.

    After forming the Blackjacks with Blackjack Lanza, they became a feared tag-team that would win many tag titles together.

    After last wrestling in WCCW, Mulligan retired in 1988.

    Eighteen years later, he and Lanza were inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame as members of the class of 2006.

Baron Von Raschke and Paul Jones

23 of 77

    Defeated: Ric Flair and Blackjack Mulligan

    Where: Raleigh, N.C.

    When: Aug. 22, 1979

    Title Reign: 63 days

    Von Raschke was last seen in Minnesota in 2007 in a play based around his life and career.

    Jones left JCP when Ted Turner bought the company and turned it into WCW.

    He continued to wrestle for the other NWA Mid-Atlantic territories until his retirement in 1991.

Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood

24 of 77

    Defeated: Baron Von Raschke and Paul Jones

    Where: Raleigh, N.C.

    When: Oct. 24, 1979

    Title Reign: 157 days

    Steamboat debuted with the WWF in 1985 and was given the nickname “The Dragon.”

    He entered into various feuds until he began a rivalry with Randy Savage. At WrestleMania III, the two of them stole the show and Steamboat won the Intercontinental Championship.

    After losing the title to the Honky Tonk Man, Steamboat left the WWF in 1988.

    Youngblood got his start in 1975 in the Texas territories under the mask of Silver Streak.

    He soon found himself in the Mid-Atlantic territories under the name Jay Youngblood.

Ray Stevens and Greg Valentine

25 of 77

    Defeated: Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood

    Where: Charlotte, N.C.

    When: March 29, 1980

    Title Reign: 42 days

    Valentine was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2004 and appeared on television once in a while until 2008.

    You can still see Greg Valentine at independent shows and at conventions.

    Ray Stevens debuted in 1950 and spent the majority of his career in the various territories of the NWA.

    While in the San Francisco territory, he became the most hated and the most popular wrestler due to his in-ring skill and his ability to get under the skin of fans with his mic work.

    He also spent a short time in the WWF during the early 1980s.

Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood

26 of 77

    Defeated: Ray Stevens and Greg Valentine

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: May 10, 1980

    Title Reign: 43 days

    Steamboat returned to the NWA in 1989 but stayed with affiliate WCW. 

    While there, he was involved in a feud with Ric Flair that resulted in him winning the NWA World Championship.

    He would leave later the same year. He then spent some time in New Japan Pro Wrestling in 1990.

    Once in JCP, Youngblood formed this team with Steamboat and they would have a heated rivalry with Don Kernodle, Private Jim Nelson and their manager Sergeant Slaughter.

    The feud would end in front of 15,000 people when Steamboat and Youngblood gained victory.

Ray Stevens and Jimmy Snuka

27 of 77

    Defeated: Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: June 22, 1980

    Title Reign: 158 days

    Stevens spent the final years of his career in the AWA teaming with Larry Zbyskzo before retiring in 1992.

    Snuka found his way to ECW in 1992, back when it was an NWA territory, and became the very first ECW champion.

    He would hold it one more time, as well as the Television Championship, before leaving in 1994.

    He was inducted into the WWF Hall of Fame in 1996 and can still be seen in the company once in a while.

    He can be seen mostly at independent shows and wrestling conventions.

Paul Jones and the Masked Superstar

28 of 77

    Defeated: Ray Stevens and Jimmy Snuka

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: Nov. 27, 1980

    Title Reign: 87 days

    During his career, Paul Jones has won 33 championships throughout the many territories of the NWA.

    The Masked Superstar is probably best known as Ax, one-half of the Demolition tag team.

    As the Masked Superstar, he wrestled throughout the NWA as well as WWWF/WWF. 

    He and Blackjack Mulligan are known to be the only wrestlers to ever perform in a 90-minute steel cage match.

    While with WWF, he wrestled like the likes of Bob Backlund and Hulk Hogan.

Ray Stevens and Ivan Koloff

29 of 77

    Defeated: Paul Jones and The Masked Superstar

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: Feb. 22, 1981

    Title Reign: 28 days

    Ray Stevens passed away on May 3, 1996.

    He would be inducted into the Professional Wrestling Hall of Fame twice in 2006. He was inducted in the categories “Modern Era” for his singles career and “Tag Team” due to his memorable heel tag-team along with Pat Patterson.

    Ivan Koloff is an extremely accomplished wrestler who has wrestled and won titles all over the world since debuting in 1961.

    While with the NWA he spent most of his time in the Mid-Atlantic territories.

Paul Jones and the Masked Superstar

30 of 77

    Defeated: Ray Stevens and Ivan Koloff

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: March 22, 1981

    Title Reign: 40 days

    Now retired from the business, Paul Jones now owns a body shop in North Carolina.

    As Ax, Masked Superstar and Smash were a dominant tag team in the WWF mowing down many other teams.

    Together, they are three-time tag-team champions.

    You can still see Ax performing at independent shows as a member of Demolition and as the Masked Superstar.

The Minnesota Wrecking Crew

31 of 77

    Defeated: Paul Jones and The Masked Wrestler

    Where: Richmond, Va.

    When: May 1, 1981

    Title Reign: ~seven months

    The titles were declared vacant in December 1981 when Gene Anderson went down with an injury.

    Ole Anderson unfortunately now suffers from multiple sclerosis and is confined to a wheelchair.

Ole Anderson and Stan Hansen

32 of 77

    Defeated: Forfeit

    Where: Atlanta, Ga.

    When: Feb. 28, 1982

    Title Reign: ~seven months

    Ole Anderson and Stan Hansen won the titles by forfeit when their opponents Wahoo McDaniel and Don Muraco never showed up for the match.

    The titles were then declared vacant in September 1982 for unknown reasons. All that is known is that the NWA forced them to relinquish the titles.

    On Jan. 9, 2012 WWE announced that they would be inducting the Four Horsemen into the WWE Hall of Fame.

    Included into the hall will be Ric Flair, Arn Anderson, Tully Blanchard, J.J. Dillon and Barry Windham. Despite being a founding member, Ole Anderson will be left out.

    Stan Hansen is best known as being the man who broke Bruno Sammartino’s neck in the late 1970s.

    He spent the majority of his career in the NWA but ended his career in Japan when he retired in 2000.

Sergeant Slaughter and Don Kernodle

33 of 77

    Defeated: Antonio Inoki and Giant Baba

    Where: Tokyo, Japan

    When: Sept. 1982

    Title Reign: ~six months

    Sergeant Slaughter and Don Kernodle defeated Antonio Inoki and Giant Baba in a tournament final to become the new champions.

    Some say that the tournament was fictional and JCP made it up to hide the fact that they just awarded the titles to Slaughter and Kernodle.

    Slaughter is best known for his time in WWF as both a heel and a face.

    As a good guy, he was beloved by the audience for his support of everything America.

    As a heel it is said that he had death threats and couldn’t go outside without a bulletproof vest and security.

    He would win the WWF Championship at the 1991 Royal Rumble but lost it a few months later to Hulk Hogan at WrestleMania.

    He was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2004 and will still make the occasional appearance for the company and will even wrestle once in a while.

    Kernodle would spend his entire career wrestling for the Mid-Atlantic territories of the NWA, where he won this title three times as well as the Six-Man Tag Team Championship once.

Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood

34 of 77

    Defeated: Sergeant Slaughter and Don Kernodle

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: March 12, 1983

    Title Reign: 98 days

    In 1991, Steamboat went back to WCW and spent three years there.

    He managed to capture the Tag Team, Television and United States Championship before retiring in 1994.

    Youngblood would also spend some time up in Canada, where he would win the NWA Canadian Television Championship.

Jack and Jerry Brisco

35 of 77

    Defeated: Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood

    Where: Greenville, S.C.

    When: June 18, 1983

    Title Reign: 107 days

    The Brisco Brothers were a dominant team wrestling for the NWA territories in Florida and in the Mid-Atlantic.

    They have held many tag-team titles together but would also have successful singles careers.

Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood

36 of 77

    Defeated: Jack and Jerry Brisco

    Where: Greenville, S.C.

    When: Oct. 3, 1983

    Title Reign: 18 days

    During his retirement, Steamboat would appear for various independent promotions, including TNA Wrestling and ROH Wrestling.

    After making appearances at wrestling events and conventions, Steamboat returned to WWE in 2005.

    After his brother Mark started to wrestle, the Youngbloods won the United States Tag Team Championship on two occasions.

Jack and Jerry Brisco

37 of 77

    Defeated: Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood

    Where: Richmond, Va.

    When: Oct. 21, 1983

    Title Reign: 34 days

    Jack Brisco would go on to become a multi-time NWA world champion while winning many other singles titles throughout the country in the NWA territories.

    Jerry Brisco would also hold many singles titles throughout the NWA but was never able to win the big one.

    He is, however, a former two-time WWF hardcore champion.

Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood

38 of 77

    Defeated: Jack and Jerry Brisco

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: Nov. 24, 1983

    Title Reign: 31 days

    The titles were declared vacant on Dec. 25, 1983 when Ricky Steamboat announced his first retirement.

    Steamboat returned to WWE in 2005 as a road agent and also made appearances on television during various special episodes.

    While wrestling in the South Pacific in 1985, Jay Youngblood would pass away on Sept. 2.

Bob Orton and Don Kernodle

39 of 77

    Defeated: Dory Funk Jr. and Jimmy Valiant

    Where: Charlotte, N.C.

    When: Jan. 8, 1984

    Title Reign: 56 days.

    Bob Orton and Don Kernodle defeated Dory Funk Jr. and Jimmy Valiant in a tournament final to become champions.

    Bob Orton is best known for his run in WWF as Roddy Piper’s lackey. He would also wear a cast on his forearm for a number of years.

    After making some appearances for WWE in 2005 alongside his son Randy Orton, Bob Orton can now be seen on the independent circuit.

    Kernodle would leave the NWA in 1986 and wrestled for independent promotions in the North and South Carolina.

    He also became a sergeant for Immigration Customs Enforcement.

Wahoo McDaniel and Mark Youngblood

40 of 77

    Defeated: Bob Orton and Don Kernodle

    Where: Charlotte, N.C.

    When: March 4, 1984

    Title Reign: 31 days

    After leaving AWA, McDaniel went back to the NWA in the Mid-Atlantic territories. While there had a feud with Johnny Valentine that is still remembered by older fans due to the stiff punch/chop exchanges the two had.

    McDaniel would capture the Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship during this feud.

    As champion, McDaniel would have what some consider a legendary feud with Ric Flair over the title.

    Youngblood spent his career in JCP but would also gain some success in Puerto Rico’s WWC promotion.

    He would retire in 1999 after winning many titles.

Jack and Jerry Brisco

41 of 77

    Defeated: Wahoo McDaniel and Mark Youngblood

    Where: Spartanburg, S.C.

    When: April 4, 1984

    Title Reign: 31 days

    Jack would retire in 1985 while Jerry would call it quits in 2000.

    The Brisco Brothers were inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2008.

    Jack Brisco would pass away on Feb. 1, 2010, while Jerry recently had a stroke which has forced him to retire from his backstage duties at WWE.

Wahoo McDaniel and Mark Youngblood

42 of 77

    Defeated: Jack and Jerry Brisco

    Where: Richmond, Va.

    When: May 5, 1984

    Title Reign: three days

    After winning many titles and wrestling throughout the country in the 1980s and early 1990s, Wahoo McDaniel would be inducted into the WCW Hall of Fame in 1995 and retire the following year.

    McDaniel would pass away on April 18, 2002.

    Despite hanging it up 13 years ago, Youngblood has come out of retirement on occasion to wrestle matches in Texas.

Ivan Koloff and Don Kernodle

43 of 77

    Defeated: Wahoo McDaniel and Mark Youngblood

    Where: Raleigh, N.C.

    When: May 8, 1984

    Title Reign: 165 days

    Koloff would reach the top of the wrestling world when he defeated Bruno Sammartino for the WWWF World Heavyweight Championship, ending Bruno's almost eight-year reign as champion.

    He was only a transitional champion, though, as he lost the title in less than a month to Pedro Morales.

    Kernodle is considered semi-retired now as he will pop up once in a while to wrestle for an independent promotion in North Carolina.

Dusty Rhodes and Manny Fernandez

44 of 77

    Defeated: Ivan Koloff and Don Kernodle

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: Oct. 20, 1984

    Title Reign: 149 days

    Back with WCW, Rhodes was mostly used as a manager and color commentator but would wrestle on occasion.

    He also appeared briefly for ECW feuding with then-champion Steve Corino.

    He debuted with TNA Wrestling in 2003 and wrestled on occasion while also being an on-screen Director of Authority as well as a booker backstage.

    He left in 2005 and returned to WWE in a backstage role.

    Dusty Rhodes was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2009 and can still be seen in FCW as head booker as well as on WWE television for the occasional comedy skit.

    Manny Fernandez got his start in the 1970s and hit it big when he beat Terry Funk for the Florida Heavyweight Championship.

    Fernandez stayed with the NWA before leaving for the AWA in 1987.

Ivan and Nikita Koloff

45 of 77

    Defeated: Dusty Rhodes and Manny Fernandez

    Where: Fayetteville, N.C.

    When: March 18, 1985

    Title Reign: 113 days

    When Krusher Khrushchev joined up with the Koloffs, the three of them defended the title under the Freebird Rule, which states that any member of the stable could defend the titles.

    After Ivan Koloff lost the world title, he remained a contender but would never recapture the belt.

    He soon returned to the Mid-Atlantic territories.

    Nikita spent the majority of his career in the Mid-Atlantic territories, where he won a number of titles.

    He also spent some time in the AWA and WCW before retiring in 1992.

The Rock N Roll Express (Ricky Morton and Robert Gibson)

46 of 77

    Defeated: Ivan Koloff and Krusher Khrushchev

    Where: Shelby, N.C.

    When: July 9, 1985

    Title Reign: 96 days

    The Rock N Roll Express formed in 1983 in Memphis but didn’t hit it big until they moved to Mid-South Wrestling and began a feud with the Midnight Express. 

Ivan and Nikita Koloff

47 of 77

    Defeated: The Rock N Roll Express

    Where: Charlotte, N.C.

    When: Oct. 13, 1985

    Title Reign: 46 days

    Ivan Koloff would retire from the ring in 1994. He is now a born-again Christian and an ordained minister.

    Nikita became a born-again Christian a year after retiring and will still appear at the occasional independent show and convention.

The Rock N Roll Express

48 of 77

    Defeated: Ivan and Nikita Koloff

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: Nov. 28, 1985

    Title Reign: 66 days

    With JCP, the Rock N Roll Express became stars. Their look and high-flying style were a hit among fans and it resulted in the team winning this title four times. 

    They spent three years with the company before leaving in 1988.

    Their last feud would be with the Four Horsemen.

The Midnight Express (Dennis Condrey and Bobby Eaton)

49 of 77

    Defeated: The Rock N Roll Express

    Where: Atlanta, Ga.

    When: Feb. 2, 1986

    Title Reign: 195 days

    The Midnight Express has seen many incarnations, but the most well-known is Condrey and Eaton.

    Together, they would win 40 Tag Team Championships.

The Rock N Roll Express

50 of 77

    Defeated: The Midnight Express

    Where: Philadelphia

    When: Aug. 16, 1986

    Title Reign: 112 days

    Since leaving the NWA, they bounced around many promotions including the AWA, WCW, WWF, Japan and even TNA in 2003.

    Gibson and Morton still team together on the independent circuit.

Rick Rude and Manny Fernandez

51 of 77

    Defeated: The Rock N Roll Express

    Where: Atlanta, Ga.

    When: Dec. 6, 1986

    Title Reign: 171 days

    After getting his big break in the WWF winning the Intercontinental Championship, Rude moved on to WCW and would win this title along with the United States Championship.

    Rick Rude would retire from professional wrestling later that year but would return two years later in ECW.

    A year later he made his way back to WWF as a member of D-Generation X. He left later that year, though, after the Montreal Screwjob.

    Rick Rude left WWF for WCW once again and he became a member of the nWo but would be taken off of television a year later.

    While training for a return to the ring, Rick Rude would pass away on April 20, 1999.

    Fernandez only spent a year in the AWA and went to Puerto Rico’s WWC in 1988.

    He stayed there until 1991 where he started wrestling on the independent circuit.

    Fernandez can still be seen on occasion in the independents.

The Rock N Roll Express

52 of 77

    Defeated: Rick Rude and Manny Fernandez

    Where: Spokane, WA

    When: May 26, 1987

    Title Reign: 126 days

    Despite the NWA announcing that the Rock N Roll Express won the title in a match, the team was actually awarded the titles when Rick Rude left for the WWF.

    There have been times where the team would split and bring in new partners.

    Calling themselves the New Rock N Roll Express, Morton has teamed with Brad Armstrong among other wrestlers.

    Gibson would sometimes partner up with Marty Jannetty and call themselves the Rock N Rockers.

Arn Anderson and Tully Blanchard

53 of 77

    Defeated: The Rock N Roll Express

    Where: Misenheimer, N.C.

    When: Sept. 29, 1987

    Title Reign: 180 days

    Arn Anderson got his start in the early 1980s as Super Olympia. It wasn’t until the Junkyard Dog suggested that he looked like an Anderson that JCP took a look at him.

    Tully Blanchard got his big break when he went to JCP where he would win the Television Championship.

    While as champion he would have a legendary feud with Dusty Rhodes over the title.

    The Four Horsemen was soon formed, and Blanchard became a part of pro wrestling history.

Lex Luger and Barry Windham

54 of 77

    Defeated: Arn Anderson and Tully Blanchard

    Where: Greensboro, N.C.

    When: March 27, 1988

    Title Reign: 24 days

    Lex Luger got his start in the Florida territories of the NWA before hitting it big in JCP in 1987.

    He became a member of the Four Horsemen for a year but would leave the faction a year later. He would then feud with the Horsemen.

    Before leaving JCP/WCW, Luger would win multiple titles including the United States and World Heavyweight Championships.

    He left WCW in 1992 and starting working for Vince McMahon.

    Barry Windham got his start in the Florida territories as well but first hit it big in the WWF in 1984 as a member of the US Express tag-team with Mike Rotunda.

    He would leave a year later and made his way back to the NWA, this time for JCP.

Arn Anderson and Tully Blanchard

55 of 77

    Defeated: Lex Luger and Barry Windham

    Where: Jacksonville, Fla.

    When: April 20, 1988

    Title Reign: 143 days

    Arn made his way to the Mid-Atlantic territories and would become an Anderson and one-half of the legendary Minnesota Wrecking Crew along with Ole.

    They became a force to be reckoned with in 1984.

    Along with Ric Flair, Tully Blanchard and James J. Dillon, the Andersons became founding members of the Four Horsemen.

    Arn soon left Ole and joined forces with Blanchard to become the Horsemen’s dominate tag-team.

    After leaving JCP for WWF, Tully and Anderson won the tag titles once before Tully was fired for drug use.

    Upon learning of his usage of drugs, WCW didn’t want him back.

    He became a born-again Christian in 1989 and wrestled on the independents and briefly worked as a road agent for WWE until he retired in 2005.

    Tully Blanchard will be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame this year as a member of the Horsemen.

The Midnight Express (Bobby Eaton and Stan Lane)

56 of 77

    Defeated: Arn Anderson and Tully Blanchard

    Where: Philadelphia

    When: Sept. 10, 1988

    Title Reign: 49 days

    Another well-known version of the Midnight Express would be Eaton and Lane.

    With only four tag-team titles, this version certainly wasn’t as successful as Eaton and Condrey.

    Condrey and Eaton can still be seen on occasion as the team on the independent circuit.

The Road Warriors (Hawk and Animal)

57 of 77

    Defeated: The Midnight Express

    Where: New Orleans, La.

    When: Oct. 29, 1988

    Title Reign: 155 days

    The Road Warriors, or sometimes Legion of Doom, began teaming in 1982 in the Mid-Atlantic territory GCW.

    Along with their manager Paul Ellering, their style and look quickly got them noticed by fans and some reports say that wrestlers would leave the arena if they saw they were scheduled to face the team.

    The Road Warriors dominated the NWA, Japan, the AWA, WCW and WWF throughout their career as a team.

    They have won tag-team gold everywhere they wrestled and are sometimes considered the best tag-team ever to grace a wrestling ring.

    Road Warrior Hawk would pass away on Oct. 19, 2003 while Animal would return to WWE in 2005 and reform the Legion of Doom with Heidenreich.

    The Road Warriors and Ellering would get their rightful place into the WWE Hall of Fame when they were inducted in 2011.

    Animal can still be seen on the independent circuit and in Japan teaming with Kensuke Sasaki as the Hell Warriors.

The Varsity Club (Steve Williams and Mike Rotunda)

58 of 77

    Defeated: The Road Warriors

    Where: New Orleans, La.

    When: April 2, 1989

    Title Reign: 35 days

    The Varsity Club were stripped of the titles on May 7, 1989 due to misconduct during a title defense. The misconduct was said to be attacking a referee.

    The Varsity Club formed in 1987 with Kevin Sullivan, Rick Steiner and Mike Rotunda. Steve Williams didn’t join until a year later.

    The group broke up in 1989 but saw brief reunions in 1999 and 2000.

    Despite only being together for a few years, the stable was a force to be reckoned with, especially during the Varsity Club/Garvins feud, which included a violent clash at the 1988 Great American Bash.

The Fabulous Freebirds (Michael Hayes and Jimmy Garvin)

59 of 77

    Defeated: The Midnight Express

    Where: Fayetteville, N.C.

    When: June 14, 1989

    Title Reign: 140 days

    The Fabulous Freebirds defeated the Midnight Express in a tournament final to become the new champions.

    The belts were then defended under the Freebird Rule. In this case, the other man eligible to defend the belts with either Hayes or Garvin was Terry Gordy.

    The Fabulous Freebirds formed in 1979 with members Michael Hayes, Terry Gordy and Buddy Roberts in the Texas promotion WCCW.

    They have wrestled all over the United States and even appeared during the Rock ‘n’ Wrestling Connection boom in WWF, but they left the company quickly upon learning that the WWF wanted to split up the stable.

The Steiner Brothers (Rick and Scott Steiner)

60 of 77

    Defeated: The Fabulous Freebirds

    Where: Atlanta, Ga.

    When: Nov. 1, 1990

    Title Reign: 199 days

    The Steiner Brothers started teaming together in 1989 in JCP/WCW.

    With their amateur wrestling background, the Steiners became a dominant tag team and won these titles on multiple occasions.

Doom (Ron Simmons and Butch Reed)

61 of 77

    Defeated: The Steiner Brothers

    Where: Washington, D.C.

    When: May 19, 1990

    Title Reign: 281 days

    When World Championship Wrestling began to withdraw from the NWA in January 1991, the NWA Mid-Atlantic Tag Team Championship were renamed the WCW Tag Team Championship.

    Doom remained as champions and are recognized as the first tag-team champions of WCW.

    Doom formed in 1989 under masks and managed by the late Nancy "Woman" Benoit.

    After losing a match to the Steiners in 1990 they were forced to unmask and soon recruited Teddy Long as their manager.

    After losing the titles, Reed turned on Simmons and the team broke up.

    Butch Reed didn’t find much success after the breakup and can still be seen on the independent circuit.

    Ron Simmons went on to become the first African American to ever win a world title when he captured the WCW World Championship in 1992 by defeating Vader.

    He went onto WWF with a ridiculous gimmick (Faarooq) before becoming a member of the Acolytes/APA.

    Simmons retired in 2010 but will still make the occasional appearance for WWE.

The Fabulous Freebirds

62 of 77

    Defeated: Doom

    Where: Phoenix, Ariz.

    When: Feb. 24, 1991

    Title Reign: negative six days

    The Fabulous Freebirds had won the titles at the WrestleWar pay-per-view on Feb. 24.

    Since the Freebirds were scheduled to win the titles, they defended them six days earlier at a television taping that would air on March 9.

    The Freebirds held onto the belts until March 9 to create the illusion that they were still champions when in reality they weren’t.

    During this confusing title reign, Terry Gordy still appeared with the group and the Freebird Rule still applied.

    Upon joining WCW in 1989, Jimmy Garvin replaced Roberts. Another member, Badstreet, soon joined the group as well.

    The Fabulous Freebirds were last seen together in 1994 when the group disbanded after 15 years.

    Michael Hayes now works backstage for WWE, Jimmy Garvin sometimes appears for WWE during their Legends Roundtable discussions on WWE Classics on Demand and Terry Gordy passed away on July 16, 2001.

The Steiner Brothers

63 of 77

    Defeated: The Fabulous Freebirds

    Where: Montgomery, Ala.

    When: Feb. 18, 1991

    Title Reign: 150 days

    The titles were declared vacant on July 18, 1991, when Scott Steiner went down with an injury.

    They left WCW in 1992 and went to WWF for two years. During their time there, they would win the WWF Tag Team Championship on two occasions.

    They also appeared briefly for ECW in 1995 before going back to WCW.


The Enforcers (Arn Anderson and Larry Zbyszko)

64 of 77

    Defeated: Rick Steiner and Bill Kazmaier

    Where: Augustus, Ga.

    When: Sept. 5, 1991

    Title Reign: 75 days

    When Vince McMahon and the WWF took notice to the Horsemen, they swooped in and took Anderson and Blanchard.

    Called the Brain Busters, they would spend a year in WWF in 1988-1989 winning tag-team gold once.

    Blanchard would be fired due to drug use and Anderson made his way back to JCP, which was now WCW.

    Larry Zbyszko got his start in 1973 in the WWWF where he became a monster heel.

    He was so hated that his car would be damaged and he would be attacked, including once getting stabbed after a match with Pedro Morales.

    After leaving, he jumped around the NWA and AWA before settling in WCW in 1990 and stayed with them until it was shut down in 2001.

    After appearing in TNA for three years from 2003-2006, Zbyszko can now be seen on the independent circuit.

Ricky Steamboat and Dustin Rhodes

65 of 77

    Defeated: The Enforcers

    Where: Savannah, Ga.

    When: Nov. 19, 1991

    Title Reign: 58 days

    Ricky Steamboat was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2009 and returned to the ring alongside Roddy Piper and Jimmy Snuka to battle Chris Jericho at WrestleMania XXV.

    His last match occurred on Aug. 15, 2009 when he teamed up with his son in Puerto Rico’s WWC promotion.

    Rhodes got his big start in WCW, winning this title along with the United States Championship.

    He would head to the WWF in 1995 as Goldust and would become Intercontinental champion on three occasions.

Arn Anderson and Bobby Eaton

66 of 77

    Defeated: Ricky Steamboat and Dustin Rhodes

    Where: Jacksonville, Fla.

    When: Jan. 16, 1992

    Title Reign: 108 days

    Within a few years, the Four Horsemen were reformed with the Andersons, Ric Flair and Paul Roma.

    The group only lasted a year and was disbanded after being seen as a failure.

    The Horsemen would return, though, a year after Anderson retired.

    In 1998, with Anderson acting as manager, the Horsemen consisted of Flair, Steve McMichael, Dean Malenko and Chris Benoit.

    Bobby Eaton spent his entire career in the NWA, mostly wrestling for JCP and the Mid-Atlantic territories.

    He has won many titles throughout his career and was a member of the Midnight Express.

    You can still see Eaton on the independent circuit, sometimes teaming with his Midnight Express partner Dennis Condrey.

The Steiner Brothers

67 of 77

    Defeated: Arn Anderson and Bobby Eaton

    Where: Chicago

    When: May 3, 1992

    Title Reign: 63 days

    While back with WCW, they would capture the tag team titles on a few more occasions.

    After two more years as a team, the Steiners broke up in 1998 and began singles careers with WCW.

The Miracle Violence Connection (Steve Williams and Terry Gordy)

68 of 77

    Defeated: The Steiner Brothers

    Where: Atlanta, Ga.

    When: July 5, 1992

    Title Reign: 59 days

    Steve Williams had a very successful career, gaining most of his success in All Japan Pro Wrestling.

    While in Japan, he became one of the biggest foreign draws and went undefeated for a decade.

    That undefeated streak was broken when he was defeated by Raven at an ECW show in 1997.

    He also made some appearances for WWF/E and even became a trainer for OVW.

    He would retire from professional wrestling in October 2009 and pass away on Dec. 29 that the same year after he lost his five-year battle with cancer.

    Terry Gordy spent the majority of his career in NWA and is best known as a member of the legendary Fabulous Freebirds.

    He would win many titles throughout the United States and Japan before passing away in 2001.

Dustin Rhodes and Barry Windham

69 of 77

    Defeated: Steve Williams and Terry Gordy

    Where: Atlanta, Ga.

    When: Sept. 21, 1992

    Title Reign: 58 days

    Rhodes would jump around between WCW, WWF/E, TNA and Japan between 1999 and 2008 before returning to WWE once again.

    Rhodes is still with WWE working backstage but may be entering into a feud with his younger brother Cody soon.

    Windham spent a year in the mid-card for becoming a main event star as a member of the Four Horsemen.

    While a member of the Horsemen, he would become NWA United States champion.

    After returning to WWF for a short time in 1989, he returned to WCW to rejoin the Horsemen.

    After pursuing the title on multiple occasions, Barry Windham would finally become NWA world champion after defeating the Great Muta in 1993.

Ricky Steamboat and Shane Douglas

70 of 77

    Defeated: Dustin Rhodes and Barry Windham

    Where: Macon, Ga.

    When: Nov. 18, 1992

    Title Reign: 104 days

    Ricky Steamboat was last seen on WWE television in June 2010 when he was attacked, and legitimately injured, by the Nexus.

    Steamboat still works for WWE in a backstage role.

    Shane Douglas got his big start in JCP/WCW but he only stuck around for a year.

    He bounced back and forth between WWF and WCW until he joined ECW in 1993 where he became a star.

    During his two years with ECW, and another three years later on, Douglas would capture the NWA World Championship once, the ECW Tag Championship twice and the ECW World Championship four times.

The Hollywood Blondes (Steve Austin and Brian Pillman)

71 of 77

    Defeated: Ricky Steamboat and Shane Douglas

    Where: Macon, Ga.

    When: March 2, 1993

    Title Reign: 169 days                

    Austin and Pillman would actually be the third version of the Hollywood Blonds.

    Together they would only win this title as they only stayed as a team from January 1993 to October 1993.

    As singles stars, both would gain much success, though Austin would become a major star.

    Austin would go onto 13 titles while with WWF/E as well as winning the 1996 King of the Ring and the 1997, 1998 and 2001 Royal Rumble matches.

    In 2009, he would be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame and will still make appearance for WWE.

    Pillman would find his most success in JCP/WCW winning this title, the United States Tag Team Championship as well as the Light Heavyweight Championship.

    While working for WWF in 1997, Brian Pillman would pass away on Oct. 5.

Arn Anderson and Paul Roma

72 of 77

    Defeated: Steve Austin and Steven Regal

    Where: Daytona Beach, Fla.

    When: Aug. 18, 1993

    Steven Regal substituted for an injured Brian Pillman.

    When WCW was shut down in 2001, WWE hired Anderson as a road agent and he’s been working there ever since.

    He will also make the occasional appearance on television and will be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame this year as a member of the Four Horsemen.

    Paul Roma got his start in WWF in 1985 as a member of the team the Young Stallions with Jim Powers.

    They would never win the tag titles, and Roma soon became a jobber for the company.

    Despite forming Power and Glory with Hercules, Roma didn’t find much success in WWF.

    After leaving WWF, he made his way to WCW and became a member of the Four Horsemen.

    He didn’t last long in the group and formed Pretty Wonderful with Paul Orndorff. Together, they won the tag-team titles twice.

    You can still see Paul Roma on the independent circuit.

The Nasty Boys (Brian Knobs and Jerry Sags)

73 of 77

    Defeated: Arn Anderson and Paul Roma

    Where: Houston

    When: Sept. 19, 1993

    Title Reign: 15 days

    The Nasty Boys began teaming in 1986 in the AWA but soon joined WCW and would win the tag-team titles three times.

    They would also spend some time in WWF, where they won the tag titles once.

2 Cold Scorpio and Marcus Bagwell

74 of 77

    Defeated: The Nasty Boys

    Where: Columbus, Ohio

    When: Oct. 4, 1993

    Title Reign: 20 days

    Scorpio began his career in the independents before heading to Japan.

    He came to WCW in 1992 where he won this title but would leave in 1994.

    He showed up in ECW where he became a star, winning tag-team gold with Sandman and the Television Championship four times.

    He went to WWF in 1996 as Flash Funk but was just used as a comedy character and found no success in the company.

    After wrestling for various independent promotions since 2000, Scorpio was last seen in TNA in 2010 during their ECW reunion phase.

    Bagwell got his big start in WCW forming various tag-teams with Tom Zenk, Scorpio, the Patriot and Scotty Riggs.

    He became Buff Bagwell after joining the nWo and remained in WCW until its demise in 2001.

    He was seen briefly in WWE after the buyout but was released within a few months.

    After making some appearances for TNA, Bagwell can now be seen on the independent circuit.

The Nasty Boys

75 of 77

    Defeated: 2 Cold Scorpio and Marcus Bagwell

    Where: New Orleans, La.

    When: Oct. 24, 1993

    Title Reign: 210 days

    After Sags was released from WCW in 1996, Knobs became a singles wrestler. He would win the WCW Hardcore Championship three times.

    After WCW went under, the Nasty Boys reformed and have stayed together ever since.

Cactus Jack and Kevin Sullivan

76 of 77

    Defeated: The Nasty Boys

    Where: Philadelphia

    When: May 22, 1994

    Title Reign: 56 days

    Cactus Jack went on to have a huge career as Mankind while also appearing as Cactus, Dude Love and under his real name in WWF/E.

    He won the WWF Championship three times and was a part of some of the most memorable moments of the Attitude Era, including when Undertaker threw him off the cage during a Hell in a Cell match.

    Foley left WWE for a few years in 2008 and showed up in TNA, where he won the Legends and World Heavyweight Championships.

    Foley has recently returned to WWE and seems to be getting involved in the CM Punk/John Laurinaitis feud.

    Kevin Sullivan is best known for his time in WCW as a member of the Varsity Club and later the Dungeon of Doom.

    Towards the end of his WCW run, he spent his time trying to get rid of Hulk Hogan, then later Chris Benoit.

    Sullivan is now considered retired but will make the occasional appearance.

Where can I comment?

Stay on your game

Latest news, insights, and forecasts on your teams across leagues.

Choose Teams
Get it on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Real-time news for your teams right on your mobile device.

Download
Copyright © 2017 Bleacher Report, Inc. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved. BleacherReport.com is part of Bleacher Report – Turner Sports Network, part of the Turner Sports and Entertainment Network. Certain photos copyright © 2017 Getty Images. Any commercial use or distribution without the express written consent of Getty Images is strictly prohibited. AdChoices